1 Systemic inflammatory impact of periodontitis on acute coronary syndrome



Yüklə 151,76 Kb.

tarix18.04.2018
ölçüsü151,76 Kb.


 



Systemic inflammatory impact of periodontitis on acute coronary syndrome 

 

Cecilia Widén 



a*

, Helene Holmer 

b

, Michael Coleman 



 c

, Marian Tudor 

b

, Ola Ohlsson 



a,b

Stefan Renvert 



a,d,e

, G. Rutger Persson 

a,f 

 

a



 School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden  

b

 Kristianstad Central Hospital, Kristianstad, Sweden 



Aston University, Birmingham, UK 

d

 Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden 



e

 Dublin Dental University Hospital, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland 

f

 University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 



 

*

Corresponding author: 



Cecilia Widén 

School of Health and Society 

Kristianstad University, SE 29188, Sweden 

Email: cecilia.widen@hkr.se 

Phone number: + 46 44 208588 

Fax number: + 46 44 209589 

 

Short title: Periodontitis and ACS 

Keywords: cardiovascular disease; serum; hs-CRP; cytokines; VEGF; oral disease; human 

 

Number of words in abstract: 



200198

 

Number of words in manuscript: 2826 



Tables: 3 

Figures: 2 

Number of references: 37 



 

 

Conflict of Interest and Sources of Funding  

None of the authors has a conflict of interest. The funding for the present study was obtained 

from Kristianstad University, Sweden, from Blekinge Technical University, Sweden, and 

from a research grant from the Research Council at the Central Hospital in Kristianstad, 

Sweden. 



 



Abstract 

Aim: A causative relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and periodontitis has 

yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to assess 

if there are 

differences in levels of 

serum cytokines between individuals with or without ACS or periodontal comorbidity.  

Material and Methods: In a case-control study, individuals with ACS (78 individuals, 10.3% 

females) and matching healthy controls (78 individuals, 28.2% females) were included. 

Medical and dental examinations were performed to diagnose ACS and periodontitis. Serum 

levels of cytokines were assessed using Luminex technology.  



Results: A diagnosis of periodontitis in the ACS and control group was diagnosed in 52.6% 

and 12.8% of the individuals, respectively. The unadjusted odds-ratio that individuals with 

ACS also had periodontitis was 7.5 (95% CI: 3.4, 16.8, p0.001). Independent of periodontal 

conditions, individuals with ACS had significantly higher serum levels of IL8 (mean: 44.3 

and 40.0 pg/ml) and 

vascular endothelial growth factor (

VEGF

)

 (mean: 82.3 and 55.3 pg/ml) 



than control individuals. A diagnosis of periodontitis made no difference in serum cytokine 

expressions.  



Conclusion: The major contributor to serum cytokine expression was associated with 

diagnosis of 



ACS. Elevated serum levels of VEGF were associated with ACS. Serum 

cytokine expression in individuals with ACS is unrelated to periodontal conditions.  




 



Clinical Relevance 

Scientific rationale: ACS impacts coronary blood flow, causing conditions ranging from 

unstable angina, through to life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Limited information is 

available regarding the relationships between cytokine expression in individuals with acute 

coronary syndrome and periodontitis. 



Principal findings:  Independent of periodontal conditions, individuals with ACS had 

significantly higher serum levels of IL8 and VEGF than control individuals. 



Practical implications: 

Although Practical prediction strategies for those at greatest risk of 

ACS must be founded in a greater understanding of the link between circulatory and the more 

easily accessible inflammatory processes, such as that which sustained periodontitisa 

diagnosis of periodontitis has been associated with ACS, the inflammatory burden of 

periodontitis as expressed by a panel of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum is not possible 

to identify at the time of the acute phase of coronary heart disease

.

 This suggests that 



periodontitis is not an immediate initiating factor of ACS 

  

 



 

 

 




 



Introduction 

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), has an enormous impact on mortality and morbidity 

worldwide (Timmis 2015). This term includes a range of conditions which precipitate the 

occlusion of coronary arterial blood flow, such as unstable angina through to fatal myocardial 

infarctions (Kaul et al. 2013). Periodontitis is a 

relatively 

common condition in adults 

and 


children which can lead to significant oral pathology

 

(Eke et al. 2015). (Keyes and Rams 



2015).  

Whilst many observational studies support a relationship between ACS and 

periodontitis, causation has yet to be defined (Lockhart et al. 2012). However, individuals 

with advanced periodontitis exhibit endothelial dysfunction along with evidence of systemic 

inflammation, which promotes their risk of developing cardiovascular disease (Amar et al. 

2003, Holtfreter et al. 2013). Whilst studies have demonstrated that periodontal treatment 

improves brachial artery endothelial function (Elter et al. 2006, Seinost et al. 2005, Tonetti et 

al. 2007), treatment of periodontitis did not impact the incidence of cardiovascular 

complications (Offenbacher et al. 2009, Beck et al. 2008). In addition, survival statistics from 

a six-year longitudinal study also failed to show that a diagnosis of periodontitis predicted 

mortality in older individuals (Renvert et al. 2015). Furthermore,  a systematic review of 

clinical trials  concluded that there was insufficient evidence to support the notion that  

periodontal therapy can prevent the recurrence of cardiovascular disease in patients with 

periodontitis (Li et al. 2014). There is a need to explore the systemic impact of periodontitis in 

terms of inflammatory markers, which may cast light on whether periodontal inflammation 

actively contributes to cardiovascular complications. 

 

Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been identified as an important 



marker of systemic inflammation and those with elevated levels of serum CRP are at 

increased risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases (Ridker 2007). 




 

Periodontitis is also associated with increased levels of CRP, and interleukin (IL)-18 (Buhlin 

et al. 2009). Some pro-inflammatory cytokines have been studied to explore the systemic 

inflammatory impact of periodontitis, leading to conflicting results. Elevated serum levels of 

IL6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-) have been demonstrated in individuals with 

periodontitis in comparison with healthy individuals (Tang et al. 2011). In contrast, a report 

determined TNF- levels to be significantly lower in individuals with periodontitis than 

control individuals (Nakajima et al. 2010). Yet another study assessed  serum TNF- levels in 

individuals with or without periodontitis and failed to demonstrate a relationship between 

serum TNF- levels and periodontal status (Gokul et al. 2012). Thus, the relationship between 

periodontitis and system expression of TNF-α is unclear.  

 

With regard to other potential markers which may link periodontitis with systemic conditions,  



patients with diffuse coronary artery ectasiae have been shown to have elevated blood levels 

of VEGF (Savino et al. 2006). In ACS, elevated VEGF concentrations may serve as a 

surrogate marker of myocardial injury (Konopka et al. 2013) and indeed, serum VEGF levels  

increase with periodontitis severity (Pradeep et al. 2011). Hence, in patients at risk for ACS, 

there appears to be an important interplay between various growth factors and cytokines, 

which are associated with inflammatory status and platelet hyper-reactivity (Gori et al. 2009).

 

 

 



Although many epidemiological studies have reported on potential casual associations 

between oral infections and cardio-metabolic diseases it remains unclear how oral infection 

may have an impact on cardiovascular diseases (Janket et al. 2015).  Thus, there appears to be 

no studies that have performed comprehensive analysis of serum cytokine levels in 

individuals with heart disease and periodontitis in comparison to cytokine levels in 

individuals without heart disease or other systemic diseases. The objectives of the present 




 

study were to assess if there are differences in the levels of serum cytokine biomarkers 

between individuals who have ACS with or without periodontal comorbidity. The null-

hypothesis is that there are no differences in serum cytokine expressions between individuals 

with or without periodontitis and/or ACS pathology. 

 

Material and Methods 

In compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki, the Regional Ethics Committee in Lund, 

Sweden, approved the study (Institutional Review Board approval no. LU556-00). After the 

details of the original study protocol had been presented (Persson et al. 2003, Renvert et al. 

2010, Renvert et al. 2006) informed consent was obtained from the individuals. Briefly, 

consecutively surviving individuals admitted to the Kristianstad Central Hospital were 

enrolled if they had a diagnosis of ACS defined by chest pain associated with typical 

electrocardiogram (ECG) changes. The initial ECG was considered diagnostic for myocardial 

infarction if there was ST segment elevation of 2 mm or more in a chest lead, or ST segment 

elevation of 1 mm or more in a limb lead. ST depression and/or T-wave inversion changes 

combined with typical serial pattern of cardiac markers [i.e. creatinine kinase isoenzyme 

(CKMB) and troponin T (TnT)] according to local laboratory standards, were also considered 

diagnostic for myocardial infarction. Left bundle block (LBB) was considered diagnostic for 

myocardial infarction if chest pain combined with typical serial pattern of cardiac markers 

were present. At the time of admission, a blood sample was taken for further analysis of 

biomarkers of inflammation.  

 

Approximately one month after treatment and release from hospital



, all surviving  these 

individuals with a diagnosis of ACS received a comprehensive periodontal examination. The 

periodontal examination included routine measurements of probing pocket depths, extent of 



 

gingival inflammation and radiographic analysis of alveolar bone loss. The methods used to 

diagnose gingivitis and bone loss have been described in detail (Persson et al. 2003). In the 

present study, individuals with loss of alveolar bone, verified by a distance between cement 

enamel junction and the highest coronal bone level exceeding 4 mm, at ≥30 % of teeth, 

combined with bleeding on probing (BOP) ≥20 % and a probing pocket depth ≥5 mm at four 

teeth or more were considered as having periodontitis.  

All study individuals were examined 

by one and the same examiner (Susanna Persson-Sättlin, dental hygienist)

 

(Renvert et al. 



2004) . This examiner was kept unaware of the medical diagnosis by not having access to 

medical data. Study individuals were instructed not to provide any pertinent information in 

regards to cardiovascular events

 

 



Individuals matched by age, socio-economic status, and smoking habits without a preceding 

diagnosis of ACS, or a diagnosis of ACS within 3 years after the enrolment in the present 

study, were included (Persson et al. 2003, Renvert et al. 2010). The control individuals were 

identified among friends to those with a current ACS or from registry available to the 

investigators. 

Data based on analysis of 80 patients with ACS and 80 control individuals from 

a group consisting of friends of the patients (39 individuals) with ACS, and from a research 

registry of subjects (41 individuals) who had participated in a timely health survey (Back et 

al. 1999). The 41 individuals identified from the health survey were selected based on a best 

fit principle (age, gender, smoking status, socio-economics) in comparison to the individuals 

in the test group.  

 

The control individuals also received a comprehensive cardiological medical examination at 



Kristianstad Central Hospital including an ECG and were cleared from evidence of ACS. 


 

Following the medical examination, the control individuals also received a comprehensive 

dental examination consistent with the examinations that the individuals with ACS received. 

 

The present study design complies with the STROBE initiative



 

 



 

Analysis of selected cytokines 

A broad panel including 23 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines was assessed using 

Luminex MagPix multi analyte technology (Luminex, Austin TX. USA). 

 This panel included 

the following cytokines; Basic FGF , Eotaxin, GCSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), 

IFN interferon gamma), Interleukin (IL): IL1β (interleukin 1 beta), IL1ra (receptor 

antagonist), IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7, IL8, 

IL9, 


IL10, IL12p70(active heterodimer),  IL13, IL17A, 

IP10 (interferon-inducible protein-10), MCP1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1), MIP1a 

(macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha ), MIP1b (macrophage inflammatory protein 

1beta), PDGFBB (platelet-derived growth factor subunit B), TNFα (tumor necrosis factor 

alpha), and VEGF (Vascular endothelial growth factor).

The cytokine kit was purchased from 

Bio-Rad (Sundbyberg, Sweden) and the cytokines were detected following the manufacturer’s 

instructions. The researcher who performed the cytokine analysis was unaware of where the 

samples represented individuals with periodontitis or not, or any other clinical data. Briefly, 

samples were defrosted, incubated with antibodies, immobilized on color-coded magnetic 

beads, washed to remove unbound material, and then incubated with biotinylated antibodies. 

After further washing, a streptavidin-phycoerythrin conjugate, which binds to the biotinylated 

antibodies, was added before a final washing step. The Luminex analyser determined the 

magnitude of the phycoerythrin-derived signal. Duplicate readings were performed in a subset 

of samples demonstrating a high level of agreement between measurements with intra-class 

Formatted: Font: Italic



 

10 

correlation (ICC) varied between 0.95 and 1.0 (p<0.001).

 Serum for the analysis of cytokines 

were not available for all individuals, Therefore, 76 individuals in the test and control groups 

were included, respectively.  

 

 



Statistical analysis 

The statistical package SPSS 22 for Windows was used for all analyses. Multivariate analysis 

with Bonferroni correction adjusted for gender was used to determine whether significant 

differences in cytokine levels existed between study groups. Chi-square analysis was used for 

dichotomized data. Independent t-tests (equal variance not assumed) were used for numerical 

data.


  Unadjusted Mantel-

H

aenszel common odds ratio was calculated. Due to the absence of 



data on serum cytokine levels from study individuals with or without heart disease and 

periodontitis were not available at the time of study design a sample size calculation was not 

possible to perform prior to the study.   In previous reports on this study materiel in regards to 

gender, smoking status, and age we have failed to identify that these factors were confounders 

(Persson et al. 2003, Renvert et al. 2004).

 

 



 

 

Results 

Data from 156 adult individuals including 76 individuals with a diagnosis of ACS (10.3 % 

females), and from 76 control individuals without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease 

were included (28.2 % females). The mean age of individuals in the ACS and control groups 

was 59.7 years (S.D. 9.2) and 59.7 years (S.D. 9.1), respectively. Serum lipid values, white 

blood cell counts, HbA1c levels were within the reference range for normal conditions. 

Characteristic medical values are presented in Table 1. 



Formatted: Font color: Black


 

11 

 

In the ACS group as well as in the control group statistical analysis failed to demonstrate that 



the prevalence of periodontitis differed by gender. Statistical analysis failed to demonstrate a 

difference in the frequency of ACS by age (p=0.96), smoking (p=0.60) or number of 

remaining teeth (p=0.29). In the ACS and control groups 22.7 % and 19.2 % were smokers, 

respectively. A diagnosis of periodontitis in the ACS and control group was diagnosed in 52.6 

% and 12.8 % of the individuals, respectively. The unadjusted 

Mantel-


H

aenszel common 

odds-ratio that individuals with ACS also had periodontitis was 7.5 (95 CI: 3.4, 16.8, 

p0.001). The prevalence of gingivitis (

bleeding on probing 

≥20 %


 of sites

4 per tooth



) did 

not differ by cardiovascular status. In fact, 100 % of the individuals with ACS and 97.3 % of 

the control individuals presented with gingivitis. Evidence of alveolar bone loss (≥4 mm at 

≥30 % of teeth) was 73.1 % in the ACS group and 23.1 % in the control group (p<0.001). 

 

In the control group (individuals without a diagnosis of ACS) statistical analysis failed to 



demonstrate differences in hs-CRP levels (p=0.95) (Figure 1) between those with or without a 

diagnosis of periodontitis. In individuals with a diagnosis of ACS statistical analysis also did 

not demonstrate differences in hs-CRP levels (p=0.41) between those with or without a 

diagnosis of periodontitis. Serum hs-CRP values were significantly higher in individuals with 

a diagnosis of ACS in comparison to those individuals without a diagnosis of ACS (p<0.001). 

Multivariate analysis adjusting for gender failed to demonstrate differences in serum cytokine 

levels in both ACS and control groups. 

 



 

12 

Independent t-test (equal variance not assumed) of cytokines in serum between individuals 

with or without a diagnosis of ACS and periodontitis (Tables 2 and 3) 

Mean values and standard deviations for 23 cytokines studied in individuals with or without 

ACS are presented. Independent of periodontal conditions, individuals with ACS had 

significantly higher serum levels of IL8 (mean value: 44.3 and 40.0, respectively, mean diff: 

4.3, SE.

 

diff: 1.6, 95 % CI: 1.2, 7.5, p<0.01)



,

 and VEGF (mean value: 82.3 and 55.3, 

respectively, mean diff: 27.0, SE.

 

diff: 9.4, 95 % CI: 8.4, 45.4, p<0.01) than control 



individuals. Statistical analysis identified that in individuals with ACS, a diagnosis of 

periodontitis or not made no difference in serum cytokine expression. Individuals with ACS 

without periodontitis had higher serum levels of VEGF than control individuals without 

periodontitis (mean value: 90.0 and 55.1, respectively, mean diff: 34.9, SE.

 

diff: 12.8, 95 % 



CI: 9.3, 60.4, p<0.01). With increase in severity of disease from periodontal and 

cardiovascular health to 

having 

both periodontitis and ACS serum VEGF levels increased 



(Figure 2). 

 

 



 

 

Discussion 

The present study identified a high odds ratio that individuals with ACS also had 

periodontitis. This finding is consistent with several other studies.  The present study also 

demonstrated that a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines were found at high levels in 

individuals without a diagnosis of periodontitis but with ACS. This suggests that periodontitis 

may not to any greater extent contribute to the inflammatory burden of a person at risk for or 

having ACS. The impact of the current ACS status may overshadow the inflammatory impact 

of periodontitis. A recent meta-analysis has demonstrated scientific evidence that periodontal 



 

13 

therapies may improve improve endothelial function and reduce biomarkers (i.e. hs-CRP, 

TNF-  and IL6) of atherosclerotic disease, especially in those already suffering from heart 

disease and/or diabetes (Teeuw et al. 2014). 

The present study failed to demonstrate that a diagnosis of periodontitis enhanced the 

expression of serum cytokine levels in individuals with ACS. We did show that elevated 

levels of IL8 and VEGF were associated with a diagnosis of ACS. Consistent with other 

studies, however, serum hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in individuals with ACS and 

periodontitis than in healthy control individuals (no clinical evidence of ACS or 

periodontitis). Gingival bleeding and probing pocket depth did not impact serum hs-CRP or 

serum cytokine levels. Consistently, the present study also failed to demonstrate a difference 

in serum hs-CRP levels in individuals with or without periodontitis and in the absence of a 

diagnosis of ACS. This is in broad agreement with the current literature in this area (Baser et 

al. 2014, Renvert et al. 2013). The identified lack of impact on serum cytokine levels when 

gingival bleeding was included may be explained by the high prevalence of gingival 

inflammation in all study individuals. The decision to use serum samples to assess the 

presence of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines was based on the concept that systemic 

hyper-inflammation may, in part be related to the pathology of periodontitis. To the best of 

our knowledge there are limited data on the impact of periodontitis on the levels of a broader 

panel of cytokines in serum from individuals with or without ACS.  

 

VEGF is a cytokine that is known to be involved in angiogenesis. It has been shown that 



VEGF levels in myocardial infarction may reflect the progressive stages of angiogenesis 

activity in the ischemic-necrotic myocardium (Lee et al. 2004). Levels of VEGF in serum 

correlate with clinical parameters of periodontal disease and serum VEGF levels increase 

progressively with the severity of periodontitis (Pradeep et al. 2011), contributing to its   




 

14 

pathogenesis (Artese et al. 2010, Prapulla et al. 2007). Our findings are consistent with these 

observations. Studies of gingival biopsies at different stages of inflammation have shown that 

levels of VEGF are related to endothelial proliferation in gingival tissues collected from 

individuals with chronic periodontitis (Kasprzak et al. 2012). Elevated VEGF levels in 

individuals with chronic periodontitis are linked with VEGF and β-defensin-1 gene 

polymorphisms (Tian et al. 2013). The present study identified that serum concentrations of 

VEGF were associated with ACS but not to periodontitis. Data have shown that in ACS 

serum VEGF concentrations are elevated and can serve as a surrogate marker of myocardial 

injury (Konopka et al. 2013). Data have also suggested that VEGF induces IP10 expression, 

which is a pro-inflammatory marker which is associated with the developing and chronic 

pathology of ACS process (Boulday et al. 2006, Frangogiannis 2004, Wilsgaard et al. 2015). 

 

Chronic periodontitis presents with phases of disease activity and quiescence. Although the 



routine criteria (extent of bone loss, pocket depth  5 mm, gingival bleeding  30 %) are well 

established, such criteria cannot identify active periodontitis. Most likely, analysis of serum or 

gingival crevicular fluid levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may distinguish 

between chronic and acute periodontitis. There is a need to further explore serum cytokine 

threshold levels that indicate periodontal inflammation. It is possible that additional studies of 

the infectious bacterial aetiology in periodontitis in relation to clinical and cytokine data can 

cast light on periodontal disease activity and its impact on cardiovascular disease. Whilst the 

present report revealed that elevated cytokine levels were associated with periodontitis and 

coronary disease, it is recognised that there are practical limitations on the interpretation of 

the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, in terms of time- and event 

dependency, which make their clinical predictivities potentially problematic.   

 



 

15 

One limitation of the present study is that the subgroup analyses included relatively few cases.  

The present study is based on a cohort of individuals who either were admitted to emergency 

care with a diagnosis of ACS, or who belonged to a sample of the community without a 

confirmed diagnosis of heart disease. Nevertheless, the study design represents case selection 

based on consecutive cases with ACS and is therefore not likely to be influenced by 

periodontal status. In addition, the individuals that had received treatment for ACS had most 

likely been prescribed medications which could have impacted periodontal status during the 

time of dental examination. Logistically, it was not possible to perform the dental 

examination at the time of admittance to the hospital for ACS. The investigators have no 

information about past diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis, on the progression of 

periodontitis, or if these study individuals with or without periodontitis were in a current or 

recent phase of active periodontitis or not and that could have had an impact on pro-

inflammatory cytokine levels.

 Information on Body Mass Index (BMI) was not collected. 

Therefore, no adjustment for this factor could be made. Data analysis on the impact of age, 

gender, and smoking status in previous reports (Persson et al. 2003, Renvert et al. 2004) have 

failed to identify that these factors were confounders to the outcome. The explanations to this 

can be explained by the study design to match individuals in test and control groups, and to 

the fact that few individuals were smokers, and that the the age range was narrow. 

 

 

In spite of the fact that few individuals were smokers, all individuals had poor oral hygiene 



reflected by the presence of gingival inflammation approaching 100 %. Thus, the periodontal 

diagnosis, including data on gingival inflammation, pocket depths, and bone loss was 

predominantly defined by data based on alveolar bone loss evaluations. The analysis of serum 

from the individuals with ACS was performed on blood samples collected at the time of 

admission and before any medical intervention or medication. Thus, the cytokine levels in 



 

16 

serum represent a ‘snapshot’ of cytokine expression at that particular time point of admission. 

Likewise, the blood samples from the control individuals were collected from individuals who 

were not taking medication or had had their medication changed within the preceding three 

months. 

 

In conclusion, a diagnosis of ACS had a major impact on serum cytokine expression and 



elevated serum levels of VEGF were also associated with ACS. However, we found serum 

cytokine expression in individuals with ACS to be unrelated to periodontal conditions.

  

 

 

Acknowledgement 

We  appreciate  the  work  by  Ms.  Susanna  Sättlin,  dental  hygienist  at  Dental  Public  Health 

Services Specialty Clinic of Periodontology, Kristianstad, Sweden for the clinical periodontal 

examinations of all study individuals



 

References  

Amar, S., Gokce, N., Morgan, S., Loukideli, M., Van Dyke, T.E.  Vita, J.A. (2003) 

Periodontal disease is associated with brachial artery endothelial dysfunction and 

systemic inflammation. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology 23, 1245-

1249. 

Artese, L., Piattelli, A., de Gouveia Cardoso, L.A., Ferrari, D.S., Onuma, T., Piccirilli, M., 



Faveri, M., Perrotti, V., Simion, M.  Shibli, J.A (2010) Immunoexpression of 

angiogenesis, nitric oxide synthase, and proliferation markers in gingival samples of 

patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis. Journal of Periodontology 81, 718-

726.


 

Formatted: Normal, Tab stops: Not at  4.78 cm

Formatted: Font: Italic

Formatted: Font: Not Bold

Formatted: Font: Not Bold

Formatted: EndNote Bibliography, Indent: Left:  0.49

cm, Hanging:  0.49 cm, Space After:  24 pt


 

17 

Back, S.E., Nilsson, J.E., Fex, G., Jeppson, J.O., Rosén, U., Tryding, N., von Schenck, H., 

Norlund, L (1999) Towards common reference intervals in clinical chemistry. An 

attempt at harmonization between three hospital laboratories in Skane, Sweden. Clinical 



Chemistry and  Laboratory  Medicine 37:573–592 

 

Baser, U., Oztekin, G., Ademoglu, E., Isik, G.  Yalcin, F (2014) Is the severity of 



periodontitis related to gingival crevicular fluid and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive 

protein concentrations? Clinical Laboratory 60, 1653-1658. 

Beck, J.D., Couper, D.J., Falkner, K.L., Graham, S.P., Grossi, S.G., Gunsolley, J.C., 

Madden, T., Maupome, G., Offenbacher, S., Stewart, D.D., Trevisan, M., Van Dyke, 

T.E.  Genco, R.J (2008) The Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study: 

adverse events. Journal of Periodontology 79, 90-96. 

Boulday, G., Haskova, Z., Reinders, M.E., Pal, S.  Briscoe, D.M (2006) Vascular 

endothelial growth factor-induced signaling pathways in endothelial cells that mediate 

overexpression of the chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein of 10 kDa in vitro and 

in vivo. Journal of Immunology 176, 3098-3107. 

Buhlin, K., Hultin, M., Norderyd, O., Persson, L., Pockley, A.G., Rabe, P., Klinge, B.  

Gustafsson, A (2009) Risk factors for atherosclerosis in cases with severe periodontitis. 



Journal of Clinical Periodontology 36, 541-549.

 

Formatted: Font: Times New Roman, 12 pt, English



(United States)

Formatted: (Asian) Japanese, (Other) English (United

States)


 

18 

Eke, P.I., Dye, B.A., Wei, L., Slade, G.D., Thornton-Evans, G.O., Borgnakke, W.S., 

Taylor, G.W., Page, R.C., Beck, J.D., Genco, R.J (2015)Update on Prevalence of 

Periodontitis in Adults in the United States: NHANES 2009 to 2012. Journal of 



Periodontology 86, 611-622.

 

Elter, J.R., Hinderliter, A.L., Offenbacher, S., Beck, J.D., Caughey, M., Brodala, N.  



Madianos, P.N (2006) The effects of periodontal therapy on vascular endothelial 

function: a pilot trial. American Heart Journal 151, 47. 

Frangogiannis, N.G (2004) Chemokines in the ischemic myocardium: from inflammation 

to fibrosis. Inflammation Research 53, 585-595. 

Gokul, K., Faizuddin, M.  Pradeep, A.R (2012) Estimation of the level of tumor necrosis 

factor- alpha in gingival crevicular fluid and serum in periodontal health & disease: A 

biochemical study. Indian Journal of Dental Research 23, 348-352. 

Gori, A.M., Cesari, F., Marcucci, R., Giusti, B., Paniccia, R., Antonucci, E., Gensini, G.F.  

Abbate, R (2009) The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines is 

associated with platelet aggregability in acute coronary syndrome patients. 



Atherosclerosis 202, 255-262. 

Holtfreter, B., Empen, K., Glaser, S., Lorbeer, R., Volzke, H., Ewert, R., Kocher, T.  Dorr, 

M (2013) Periodontitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in a general 

population: a cross-sectional study. PLoS One 8, e84603. 



Formatted: Font: Italic

Formatted: Font: Bold


 

19 

Janket, S.J., Javaheri, H., Ackerson, L.K., Ayilavarapu, S.  Meurman, J.H. (2015) Oral 

Infections, Metabolic Inflammation, Genetics, and Cardiometabolic Diseases. Journal 

of Dental Research 94, 119S-127S. 

Kasprzak, A., Surdacka, A., Tomczak, M., Przybyszewska, W., Seraszek-Jaros, A., 

Malkowska-Lanzafame, A., Siodla, E.  Kaczmarek, E (2012) Expression of 

angiogenesis-stimulating factors (VEGF, CD31, CD105) and angiogenetic index in 

gingivae of patients with chronic periodontitis. Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 50

554-564. 

Kaul, P., Ezekowitz, J.A., Armstrong, P.W., Leung, B.K., Savu, A., Welsh, R.C., Quan, H., 

Knudtson, M.L.  McAlister, F.A (2013) Incidence of heart failure and mortality after 

acute coronary syndromes. American Heart Journal 165, 379-385 e372. 

Keyes, P.H.  Rams, T.E (2015) Subgingival Microbial and Inflammatory Cell 

Morphotypes Associated with Chronic Periodontitis Progression in Treated Adults. 

Journal of International Academy of Periodontology 17, 49-57. 

Konopka, A., Janas, J., Piotrowski, W.  Stepinska, J (2013) Concentration of vascular 

endothelial growth factor in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Cytokine 61, 664-

669. 


Lee, K.W., Lip, G.Y.  Blann, A.D (2004) Plasma angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, 

angiopoietin receptor tie-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in acute 

coronary syndromes. Circulation 110, 2355-2360. 

Formatted: Swedish (Sweden)



 

20 

Li, C., Lv, Z., Shi, Z., Zhu, Y., Wu, Y., Li, L.  Iheozor-Ejiofor, Z (2014) Periodontal 

therapy for the management of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic 

periodontitis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 8, CD009197. 

Lockhart, P.B., Bolger, A.F., Papapanou, P.N., Osinbowale, O., Trevisan, M., Levison, 

M.E., Taubert, K.A., Newburger, J.W., Gornik, H.L., Gewitz, M.H., Wilson, W.R., 

Smith, S.C., Jr., Baddour, L.M., American Heart Association Rheumatic Fever, E., 

Kawasaki Disease Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, 

Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease, and 

Council on Clinical Cardiology (2012) Periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular 

disease: does the evidence support an independent association?: a scientific statement 

from the American Heart Association. Circulation 125, 2520-2544. 

Nakajima, T., Honda, T., Domon, H., Okui, T., Kajita, K., Ito, H., Takahashi, N., 

Maekawa, T., Tabeta, K.  Yamazaki, K (2010) Periodontitis-associated up-regulation of 

systemic inflammatory mediator level may increase the risk of coronary heart disease. 

Journal of Periodontal Reserach 45, 116-122. 

Offenbacher, S., Beck, J.D., Moss, K., Mendoza, L., Paquette, D.W., Barrow, D.A., 

Couper, D.J., Stewart, D.D., Falkner, K.L., Graham, S.P., Grossi, S., Gunsolley, J.C., 

Madden, T., Maupome, G., Trevisan, M., Van Dyke, T.E.  Genco, R.J (2009) Results 

from the Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) Study: a pilot multicentered, 

randomized, controlled trial to study effects of periodontal therapy in a secondary 

prevention model of cardiovascular disease. Journal of Periodontology 80, 190-201. 



 

21 

Persson, R.G., Ohlsson, O., Pettersson, T.  Renvert, S. (2003) Chronic periodontitis, a 

significant relationship with acute myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal  24

2108-2115. 

Pradeep, A.R., Prapulla, D.V., Sharma, A.  Sujatha, P.B (2011) Gingival crevicular fluid 

and serum vascular endothelial growth factor: their relationship in periodontal health, 

disease and after treatment. Cytokine 54, 200-204. 

Prapulla, D.V., Sujatha, P.B.  Pradeep, A.R. (2007) Gingival crevicular fluid VEGF levels 

in periodontal health and disease. Journal of  Periodontology 78, 1783-1787.

 

Renvert, S., Ohlsson, O., Persson, S., Lang, N.P., Persson, G.R (2004) Analysis of 



periodontal risk profiles in adults with or without a history of myocardial infarction. 

Journal of  Clinical Periodontolog31, 19-24

 

Renvert, S., Ohlsson, O., Pettersson, T.  Persson, G.R. (2010) Periodontitis: a future risk of 



acute coronary syndrome? A follow-up study over 3 years. Journal of  Periodontology  

81, 992-1000. 

Renvert, S., Persson, R.E.  Persson, G.R. (2013) Tooth loss and periodontitis in older 

individuals: results from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. Journal of  

Periodontology 84, 1134-1144. 

Renvert, S., Pettersson, T., Ohlsson, O.  Persson, G.R (2006) Bacterial profile and burden 

of periodontal infection in subjects with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. 

Journal of  Periodontology  77, 1110-1119. 

Formatted: Font: Italic

Formatted: Font: Italic

Formatted: Font: Bold



 

22 

Renvert, S., Wallin-Bengtsson, V., Berglund, J.  Persson, G.R (2015) Periodontitis in older 

Swedish individuals fails to predict mortality. Clinical Oral Investigations 19, 193-200. 

Ridker, P.M (2007) Inflammatory biomarkers and risks of myocardial infarction, stroke, 

diabetes, and total mortality: implications for longevity. Nutrition Reviews 65, S253-

259. 


Savino, M., Parisi, Q., Biondi-Zoccai, G.G., Pristipino, C., Cianflone, D.  Crea, F (2006) 

New insights into molecular mechanisms of diffuse coronary ectasiae: a possible role 

for VEGF. Internatio

nalanl

 Journal of Cardiology 106, 307-312. 

Seinost, G., Wimmer, G., Skerget, M., Thaller, E., Brodmann, M., Gasser, R., Bratschko, 

R.O.  Pilger, E. (2005) Periodontal treatment improves endothelial dysfunction in 

patients with severe periodontitis. American Heart Journal 149, 1050-1054. 

Tang, K., Lin, M., Wu, Y.  Yan, F (2011) Alterations of serum lipid and inflammatory 

cytokine profiles in patients with coronary heart disease and chronic periodontitis: a 

pilot study. Journal of International Medical Research 39, 238-248. 

Teeuw, W.J., Slot, D.E., Susanto, H., Gerdes, V.E., Abbas, F., D'Aiuto, F., Kastelein, J.J., 

Loos, B.G (2014) Treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile: a 

systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Periodontology 41,70-79. 

Tian, Y., Li, J.L., Hao, L., Yue, Y., Wang, M., Loo, W.T., Cheung, M.N., Chow, L.W., 

Liu, Q., Yip, A.Y., Ng, E.L., Chow, C.Y.  Chow, C.Y (2013) Association of cytokines, 

high sensitive C-reactive protein, VEGF and beta-defensin-1 gene polymorphisms and 



 

23 

their protein expressions with chronic periodontitis in the Chinese population. 



International Journal of Biological Markers 28, 100-107. 

Timmis, A (2015) Acute coronary syndromes. Biomed Central Journals 351, h5153. 

Tonetti, M.S., D'Aiuto, F., Nibali, L., Donald, A., Storry, C., Parkar, M., Suvan, J., 

Hingorani, A.D., Vallance, P.  Deanfield, J. (2007) Treatment of periodontitis and 

endothelial function. New England Journal of Medicine  356, 911-920. 

Wilsgaard, T., Mathiesen, E.B., Patwardhan, A., Rowe, M.W., Schirmer, H., Lochen, 

M.L., Sudduth-Klinger, J., Hamren, S., Bonaa, K.H.  Njolstad, I (2015) Clinically 

significant novel biomarkers for prediction of first ever myocardial infarction: the 



tromso study. Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics 8, 363-371. 


 

24 

Figure Legends 

Figure 1. Box-plot diagram illustrating differences in hs-CRP levels by cardiovascular and 

periodontal status ( = outlier). 

Figure 2. Box-plot diagram illustrating differences in VEGF levels by cardiovascular and 

periodontal status ( = outlier). 



 

25 

Tables 

Table 1. Mean levels and standard deviations of medical values in control and ACS 

individuals.  

Variables 

Control (n=78) 

ACS (n=78) 

Sign 

Mean 

S.D. 

Mean 

S.D. 

Cholesterol (mmol/l) 

5.6 

0.9 


5.0 

1.2 


p=0.001 

Triglycerides (mmol/l) 

1.8 

1.7 


1.6 

0.8 


NS 

High density lipids (mmol/l) 

1.4 

0.4 


1.2 

0.3 


p=0.000 

Low density lipids (mmol/l) 

3.4 

0.9 


3.0 

1.2 


p<0.05 

HbA1c (mmol/mol) 

28.3 

13.7 


31.7 

12.8 


NS 

WBC (×10


9

/l) 


6.4 

1.8 


8.6 

2.9 


p=0.000 

 


 

26 

Table 2. Mean levels and standard deviations of serum cytokines in control individuals and 

individuals with a diagnosis of ACS. (* = significant differences between groups, p<0.01) 

Cytokine 

Control (n=78) 

ACS (n=78) 

Mean 

S.D. 

Mean 

S.D. 

BasicFGF 

75.6 

54.1 


87.1 

68.6 


Eotaxin 

127.2 


167.3 

110.1 


65.5 

GCSF 


124.6 

65.5 


137.0 

55.0 


IFN 

95.8 


138.7 

104.9 


114.0 

IL1β 


5.8 

8.2 


5.3 

3.3 


IL1ra 

592.4 


2088.8 

308.4 


537.9 

IL4 


4.5 

2.1 


4.9 

1.9 


IL5 

10.9 


4.8 

11.8 


3.6 

IL6 


20.4 

54.6 


16.1 

11.4 


IL7 

17.5 


13.5 

16.1 


4.8 

IL8* 


40.0 

9.3 


44.3 

10.3 


IL9 

28.7 


72.1 

23.3 


17.1 

IL10 


36.2 

121.3 


29.3 

60.8 


IL12p70 

71.7 


118.5 

74.2 


63.4 

IL13 


9.5 

11.5 


8.6 

3.5 


IL17A 

132.9 


93.8 

163.8 


133.7 

IP10 


707.9 

495.4 


824.7 

749.0 


MCP1 

60.8 


41.0 

65.9 


35.1 

MIP1a 


11.6 

6.1 


12.2 

8.8 


MIP1b 

156.6 


57.9 

171.7 


56.1 


 

27 

PDGFBB 


3919.0 

1344.7 


4026.7 

1358.8 


TNFα 

85.3 


185.5 

72.1 


66.1 

VEGF* 


55.3 

53.1 


82.3 

63.6 



 

28 

Table 3. Levels of cytokines in serum from control individuals without periodontitis (n=68) or 

with periodontitis (n=10) and individuals with a diagnosis of ACS without periodontitis 

(n=37) or with periodontitis (n=41). Data are presented for mean values, mean differences, 

S.E. mean diff, 95 % CI and significance when adjusted for smoking history.  

Cytokine 

Control 

ACS 

Mean diff 

S.E. diff 

95 % CI 

Sign 

IL8 


40.0 

44.3 


4.3 

1.6 


1.2, 7.5 

p<0.01 


VEGF 

55.3 


82.3 

27.0 


9.4 

8.4, 45.4 

p<0.01 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Control 



ACS 

 

 

 

 

Cytokine 

Periodontitis 

negative 

Periodontitis 

negative 

Mean diff 

 

S.E. diff 

95 % CI 

Sign 

VEGF 


55.1 

90.0 


34.9 

12.8 


9.3, 60.4 

p<0.01 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

ACS 



ACS 

 

 

 

 

Cytokine 

Periodontitis 

negative 

Periodontitis 

positive 

Mean diff 

 

S.E. diff 

95 % CI 

Sign 

 

Data analysis failed to show differences by periodontal status in individuals with 

ACS. 

NS 


 

 

 





Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə