Acs ja ja-2011-01786y



Yüklə 4,89 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/7
tarix29.07.2018
ölçüsü4,89 Mb.
#59535
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Published:

April 27, 2011

r 2011 American Chemical Society

9023


dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja201786y

|

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 9023–9035



ARTICLE

pubs.acs.org/JACS

Benzene under High Pressure: a Story of Molecular Crystals

Transforming to Saturated Networks, with a Possible

Intermediate Metallic Phase

Xiao-Dong Wen,

Roald Ho


ffmann,* and N. W. Ashcroft

Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics

and Cornell Center for Materials Research, Clark Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, United States

b

S



Supporting Information

T

he stable phase of carbon under high pressure (up to 500



GPa) is diamond, a wide band gap insulator.

1

Hydrogen,



which has been metalized,

2

does not become metallic under static



conditions until P > 350 GPa.

3

Could an



“alloy” of C and H be

di

fferent and metalize at a lower pressure? This is the impetus



behind the work reported in what follows.

’ THE BENZENE PHASE DIAGRAM, AND PREVIOUS

STUDIES

Consider an equal carbon



Àhydrogen ratio, a 1:1 assembly.

Among CH systems, benzene (C

6

H

6



), the emblem of organic

chemistry, comes

first to mind as a realization. In fact, solid

benzene under pressure has been extensively investigated, from

P. W. Bridgman

’s classic pioneering study

4

to the present.



There are two main views of the phase diagram of solid

benzene. The

first phase diagram of benzene, shown in Figure 1a,

was constructed by Thi

ery and Leger from Raman and X-ray

studies


5

under high pressure. Liquid benzene crystallizes, at room

temperature and about 700 bar, in an orthorhombic phase I (Pbca).

An intermediate phase I

0

was suggested from discontinuities in



the cell constants of phase I. Phase II (P4

3

2



1

2) was said to exist

between 1.4 and 4 GPa, and phase III is stable between 4 and 11

GPa. The structure of phase III is monoclinic P2

1

/c, with two



molecules per unit cell. Both the I

ÀII and IIÀIII phase transi-

tions are extremely sluggish. Upon increase of pressure, two

more phases were suggested by Thi

ery and Leger: benzene III

0

,



stable between 11 and 24 GPa, and benzene IV, stable at even

higher pressure.

When benzene is compressed above 24 GPa at 25

°C, a solid

compound is recovered after the pressure is released. The structure

of that solid is not known. Benzene III

0

is supposed to be only a



modi

fication of benzene III, and benzene IV is thought to be

polymer-like. Phases I

0

, III



0

, and IV are not well-characterized,

and there is still some debate on whether they are established

phases or not.

Another phase diagram was developed by Ciabini et al.

6,7


in

2005 from infrared spectroscopy and X-ray analysis under high

pressure, shown in Figure 1b. Phase I is orthorhombic Pbca.

Phase II, crystallizing in space group P2

1

/c, is the same as phase



III assigned by Thi

ery and Leger. The P2

1

/c phase is stable up to



Received:

March 8, 2011

ABSTRACT:

In a theoretical study, benzene is compressed up

to 300 GPa. The transformations found between molecular

phases generally match the experimental

findings in the mod-

erate pressure regime (<20 GPa): phase I (Pbca) is found to be

stable up to 4 GPa, while phase II (P4

3

2



1

2) is preferred in a

narrow pressure range of 4

À7 GPa. Phase III (P2

1

/c) is at



lowest enthalpy at higher pressures. Above 50 GPa, phase V

(P2


1

at 0 GPa; P2

1

/c at high pressure) comes into play, slightly



more stable than phase III in the range of 50

À80 GP, but unstable

to rearrangement to a saturated, four-coordinate (at C), one-dimensional polymer. Actually, throughout the entire pressure range,

crystals of graphane possess lower enthalpy than molecular benzene structures; a simple thermochemical argument is given for why this

is so. In several of the benzene phases there nevertheless are substantial barriers to rearranging the molecules to a saturated polymer,

especially at low temperatures. Even at room temperature these barriers should allow one to study the e

ffect of pressure on the

metastable molecular phases. Molecular phase III (P2

1

/c) is one such; it remains metastable to higher pressures up to



∼200 GPa, at

which point it too rearranges spontaneously to a saturated, tetracoordinate CH polymer. At 300 K the isomerization transition occurs at

a lower pressure. Nevertheless, there may be a narrow region of pressure, between P = 180 and 200 GPa, where one could

find a


metallic, molecular benzene state. We explore several lower dimensional models for such a metallic benzene. We also probe the possible

first steps in a localized, nucleated benzene polymerization by studying the dimerization of benzene molecules. Several new (C

6

H

6



)

2

dimers are predicted.





Yüklə 4,89 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə