Aksum: No Questions Authors



Yüklə 99,94 Kb.

tarix08.03.2018
ölçüsü99,94 Kb.


 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


Aksum: No Questions 

 

 



Authors: Kimberly Adams, Christopher Adams, 

Cindy Bloom, Michigan Geographic Alliance 

 

Overview: Students will map the rise and fall of an 

ancient African empire and explain contributing 

factors. 

 

 Essential Questions:  



 

What is the difference between a kingdom, 



civilization, and empire?  

 



What factors can cause the rise and fall of a 

civilization?  

 

 Objectives: Students will:  



 

Describe the components of a kingdom, 



civilization, and empire 

 



Describe the factors that can contribute to 

the fall of a kingdom/civilization/empire 

 

Create a timeline of Aksum events 



 

Map the rise and fall of Aksum 



 

Use World GeoHistoGram/creation of Aksum Civilization on a handout for inquiry 



 

Subject/Grade Level: World History/Geography, 6-12  

 

Duration: 1-3 class periods depending on activities and extensions 

 

Student Materials: Colored pencils, Student worksheets (timeline activity, mapping activity), student 

atlases, World GeoHistoGram (MGA), Map of NE Africa/SW Asia 

 

Teacher Materials: Teacher Background Notes; Aksum PowerPoint; C3 Strand References 

 

References:  CIA Factbook, 

www.historyteacher.net

archeology.about.com/od/ethiopia/Ethiopian_Culture_History_and_Archeology.htm 



 

 

 



 

 



 

National Geography Standards:  

Standard 11: The patterns and networks of 

economic interdependence on Earth’s surface  



 

National World History Standards:  

Explain the connections between maritime trade 

and the power of the Kingdom of Aksum in 

Northeast Africa.  



 

Modes of Spatial Thinking:  

Region: Identify groups of places that are close to 

each other and have similar conditions and 

connections.  

 

Modes of Spatial/Temporal Thinking:  

Diffusion: Compare maps from different times, 

describe changes in the extent of something, and 

predict possible future spread or shrinkage. 

 

 



 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


C3 Strands 

 

D2.eco.1.6-8. explain how economic decisions affect the well-being of individuals, businesses, and society. 



D2.eco.14.6-8. explain barriers to trade and how those barriers influence trade among nations. 

D2.Geo.2.6-8. Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships between 

the locations of places and regions, and changes in their environmental characteristics. 

D2.Geo.2.9-12. Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships 

between the locations of places and regions and their political, cultural, and economic dynamics. 

D2.Geo.3.6-8. Use paper based and electronic map- ping and graphing techniques to represent and analyze spatial 

patterns of different environmental and cultural characteristics 

D2.Geo.5.6-8. Analyze the combinations of cultural and environmental characteristics that make places both 

similar to and different from other places. 

D2.Geo.5.9-12. evaluate how political and economic decisions throughout time have influenced cultural and 

environmental characteristics of various places and regions 

D2.Geo.7.6-8. explain how changes in transportation and communication technology influence the spatial 

connections among human settlements and affect the diffusion of ideas and cultural practices. 

D2.Geo.7.9-12. Analyze the reciprocal nature of how historical events and the spatial diffusion of ideas, 

technologies, and cultural practices have influenced migration patterns and the distribution of human population 

D2.His.1.6-8. Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts. 

D2.His.1.9-12. evaluate how historical events and developments were shaped by unique circumstances of time 

and place as well as broader historical contexts 

D2.His.12.6-8. Use questions generated about multiple historical sources to identify further areas of inquiry and 

additional sources. 

D2.His.12.9-12. Use questions generated about multiple historical sources to pursue further inquiry and 

investigate additional sources 

D2.His.14.6-8. explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past. 

D2.His.14.9-12. Analyze multiple and complex causes and effects of events in the past. 



 

Lesson Procedure 

1.

 



Warm-up – What do you know about Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Djibouti? Use Teacher Background to 

discuss this area in Africa) 

 

2.

 



Vocabulary Review-What is the definition of kingdom, civilization, empire? 



 



Kingdom: Area ruled by an inherited ruler, often a king or queen 



 



Civilization: A society that has the following characteristics – produces a surplus of food; 

establishes towns or cities with some form of government; division of labor. 



 

Empire: Form of government in which an individual or a single people rules over many other 

peoples and their territory 

 

3.

 



Guided Practice Part I- Hand out the timeline activity. Have students: 



 

Read the events silently and number them in chronological order. 



 

Reread events and circle key verbs in each. What do the context clues tell us about this 

civilization?   



 

Place the events in chronological order.  How did you accomplish this? 



 

Hold a class discussion of the events, noting how they relate to the definition of a civilization  



 

Create the timeline. Complete first date with students as example. 



 

Have students complete the activity and check together. 




 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


4.

 

 Guided Practice Part II-Hand out student atlases or use google earth/web maps, etc. Have 

students: 

 



Find the location of historical Aksum.  

 



Describe current geographical features of the area (landforms, bodies of water, climate, 

vegetation, natural resources) 

 

What might Aksum have been able to trade? Using teacher notes, provide students with actual 



Aksum trade materials. 

 



Hand out the Mapping Activity. Model the labeling activity (one label, one arrow) 

 



Complete the mapping activity. 

 



Discuss/correct the map and questions 

 



Discuss some of the factors that allowed Aksum to grow. (see teacher notes) 

 



Discuss some of the factors that led to the decline of Aksum. 

 

5.



 

Guided Practice Part III- 

 



Using the timeline, map, and previous knowledge, create a student version for Aksum on the 

GeoHistoGram blank sheet. (group work)  

 

Students will place time periods and location of the Aksum civilization over time on the blank 



sheet. 

 



Look at the Overview of the GeoHistoGram and have students analyze their blank copy in 

comparison to the overview.  Lead them into the inquiry process with questions and discussion. 

 

Look at your diagrams of empires and possibly intercontinental bridges and decide whether 



Aksum spread and declined along with a particular empire, bridge or even a religion. 

 

6.

 



Concluding Discussion: View and compare the student sheet of Aksum with the GeoHistoGram 

and discuss the aspects of culture, ie. religion and the push/pull factors that affected Aksum.(View the 

GeoHistoGram Clickable PDFs on line or hard copy to demonstrate the aspect of religious perspective 

and compare to the larger GeoHistoGram.  Guide students to further knowledge:  Why Aksum is placed 

in the “Roman Civilization”?) 

 



Discuss some of the factors that allowed Aksum to grow and decline. (see teacher background) 

 



Have students hypothesize and write a paragraph or two comparing other civilizations they have 

studied to see show similarities or differences of civilizations both current or those in the past. 

 

Assessment of Activity: 

 

 



Completion of timeline 

 



Completion of mapping activity 

 



GeoHistoGram Inquiry 

 



Paragraph – compare rise and fall of Aksum to other civilizations/empires 

 



Paragraph – what aspects of the decline of Aksum might be influencing this region of 

the world today? 

 

Students will read newspaper articles or research off the web that describe Ethiopia, 



Egypt and Africa in general today. The information will elucidate how various people 

view Africa and Ethiopia. Attention should be given to whether Ethiopia is seen as a 

unique African country in a full continent as opposed to just part of a single African 

“country”. Students must determine whether Ethiopia is portrayed in a positive light 




 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


or not in general today. Students should also focus on whether there is a difference 

between how Egypt and Ethiopia are seen in the world. For example, is Egypt part of 

Africa? Is Ethiopia part of Africa? Students will then determine whether the modern 

day accounts present a fair picture of this region of Africa or not. Students will record 

their findings and bring them into class the next day and use their GeoHistoGram info 

to support their opinions.. 

 

Adaptations:   

 



Work in pairs 

 



Fill dates in on timeline for students – students fill in events (vice-versa) 

 



Placing Numbers chronologically on timeline 

 



Direct instruction for timeline and map activity 

 



Label locations on map for students 

 



GeoHistoGram (Dates filled in, Religion aspects filled in) 

 

Extensions: 

 

Research the ivory trade of 100 C.E. and compare it to the ivory trade of today. Why has 



the ivory trade changed? 

 



Follow the history of Christian Ethiopia from the fall of Aksum to present. What has 

happened to this group? 

 

Research the coinage of Aksum. How does a coinage system change a trading system? 



 

Compare the Aksum civilization to other civilizations of the time, for example, the Maya. 



Why did the Aksum civilization fade away relatively quickly while the Mayans continued 

to influence Central America until C.E. 1500’s? 

 

Research the Aksum using the primary document, Inscription of Ezana, King of Aksum, 



circa 325 C.E. Compare Aksum’s relationship with its trading partners to that of the 

Mayan. 


 

 

 


 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


Teacher Notes 

Definitions: 

 

Kingdom


:

 

Area ruled by an inherited ruler, often a king or queen 



 

Civilization

A society that has the following characteristics – produces a surplus of food; establishes 



towns or cities with some form of government; division  of labor.  

 

Empire



Form of government in which an individual or a single people rules over many other 

peoples and their territory  

 

 



 

 

 



Some factors in the rise of Aksum: 

 

 



 

Location – Blue Nile, Red Sea for trade 

 

 

 



Forests – for charcoal used in metal work 

 

 



 

Fertile soil – agriculture 

 

 

 



Trade Goods – ivory, skins, metal work, emeralds, grains, slaves 

 

 



 

Currency – first African currency outside of Roman sphere 

 

Some factors in the decline of Aksum: 



 

 

 



Movement of Persian Empire into the Arabian Peninsula 

 

 



 

The expansion of Islam 

 

 

 



Deforestation 

 

 



 

Soil degradation 

Movement of trade routes from Red Sea to Persian Gulf and east 

 

Timeline Notes for Ancient Aksum Civilization 



c. 4th cnt. BCE-1st c. BCE possible beginnings of Aksum and the Region 

c. 1st cnt. BCE- the City of Aksum is established 

c. mid 1st cnt. BCE- the Ruler Zos(c)kales is established as King 

c. 3rd cnt. CE. -Aksum begins interfering in South Arabian affairs 

c. late 3rd cnt.(270-610) CE-Aksum begins minting their own currency 

c. 325-328 CE-By order of King Ezana, Aksum coverts to Christianity 

c. 320-330 CE-Aksum begins using the symbol of the “Cross” on their coinage 

c. 350 CE- Aksum conquers the Kingdom of Kush. 

c. late 4th cnt. CE- Aksum controlled land in what is present day Northern Ethiopia, Eritrea, Northern Sudan, 

Southern Egypt, Djibouti,Western Somaliland, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia totaling around 1.25 million km2 



c. 5th-6th cnt. CE- Aksum is believed to be a quasi-ally of Byzantium against the Persian Empire  —also 

beginning of their 2nd Golden Age 



c. 6th cnt. CE- Due to economic isolation and the increase and spread of Islam, the Kingdom of   Aksum begins 

to decline 



c. early 7th cnt. CE- Aksum ceases production of coins 

c. 950 CE- Aksum dissolves with an invasion from the south of pagan or Jewish peoples, possibly the Jewish 

Queen Gudit 



c. 10th cnt. CE- Dark Ages begin 

c. 11th-12th cnt. CE- Aksum civilization is replaced by the Zagwe Dynasty 

 


 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


 

Interest ing Fact s A bout Ethiopia’s History and C urrent Af f airs  

 

Unique among African countries, the ancient Ethiopian monarchy maintained its freedom from 

colonial rule with the exception of the 1936-41 Italian occupation during World War II. In 1974, a 

military junta, the Derg, deposed Emperor Haile SELASSIE (who had ruled since 1930) and 

established a socialist state. Torn by bloody coups, uprisings, wide-scale drought, and massive 

refugee problems, the regime was finally toppled in 1991 by a coalition of rebel forces, the 

Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF). A constitution was adopted in 1994, 

and Ethiopia's first multiparty elections were held in 1995. A border war with Eritrea late in the 

1990's ended with a peace treaty in December 2000. Final demarcation of the boundary is currently 

on hold due to Ethiopian objections to an international commission's finding requiring it to surrender 

territory considered sensitive to Ethiopia. 

 

Ethiopia is a landlocked - entire coastline along the Red Sea was lost with the de jure 



independence of Eritrea on 24 May 1993; the Blue Nile, the chief headstream of the Nile by 

water volume, rises in T'ana Hayk (Lake Tana) in northwest Ethiopia; three major crops are 

believed to have originated in Ethiopia: coffee, grain sorghum, and castor bean 

 

Ethiopia is the oldest independent country in Africa and one of the oldest in the world - at least 



2,000 years 

 

Ethiopia's poverty-stricken economy is based on agriculture, accounting for almost half of GDP, 



60% of exports, and 80% of total employment. The agricultural sector suffers from frequent drought 

and poor cultivation practices. Coffee is critical to the Ethiopian economy with exports of some $350 

million in 2006, but historically low prices have seen many farmers switching to qat (kahat) to 

supplement income. The war with Eritrea in 1998-2000 and recurrent drought have buffeted the 

economy, in particular coffee production. In November 2001, Ethiopia qualified for debt relief from 

the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative, and in December 2005 the IMF voted to 

forgive Ethiopia's debt to the body. Under Ethiopia's land tenure system, the government owns all 

land and provides long-term leases to the tenants; the system continues to hamper growth in the 

industrial sector as entrepreneurs are unable to use land as collateral for loans. Drought struck again 

late in 2002, leading to a 3.3% decline in GDP in 2003. Normal weather patterns helped agricultural 

and GDP growth recover in 2004-06. 

Ethiopia is the transit hub for heroin originating in Southwest and Southeast Asia and destined for 

Europe, as well as cocaine destined for markets in southern Africa; cultivates qat (khat) for local use 

and regional export, principally to Djibouti and Somalia (legal in all three countries); the lack of a 

well-developed financial system limits the country's utility as a money laundering center. 

 

Religions:  Christian 60.8% (Orthodox 50.6%, Protestant 10.2%), Muslim 32.8%, traditional 6%, 



other 1.8% (1994 census) 

 

Exports:  $17.65 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 



Partners: Germany 15.5%, China 10.5%, Japan 8.5%, Saudi Arabia 6.9%, Djibouti 6.8%, 

Switzerland 6.4%, Italy 5.9%, US 5.5%, Netherlands 4.2% (2005) 

 



 

Michigan Geographic Alliance 

            Aksum: No Questions 

2015 


Commodities: coffee, qat, gold, leather products, live animals, oilseed

 

 



    

Imports: $4.105 billion f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

 

Partners: Saudi Arabia 14.7%, China 12.6%, US 12.4%, India 6.7%, Italy 4.6% (2005) 



 

Commodities: food and live animals, petroleum and petroleum products, chemicals, 

machinery, motor vehicles, cereals, textiles 

 

Interesting Facts About Eritrea’s Histo ry and C urrent A ff airs  

 

Background Information: Eritrea was awarded to Ethiopia in 1952 as part of a federation. 

Ethiopia's annexation of Eritrea as a province 10 years later sparked a 30-year struggle for 

independence that ended in 1991 with Eritrean rebels defeating governmental forces; 

independence was overwhelmingly approved in a 1993 referendum. A two-and-a-half-year 

border war with Ethiopia that erupted in 1998 ended under UN auspices in December 2000. 

Eritrea currently hosts a UN peacekeeping operation that is monitoring a 25 km-wide 

Temporary Security Zone on the border with Ethiopia. An international commission, 

organized to resolve the border dispute, posted its findings in 2002. However, both parties 

have been unable to reach agreement on implementing the decision. In November 2006, the 

international commission informed Eritrea and Ethiopia they had one year to demarcate the 

border or the border demarcation would be based on coordinates. 

 

Geographic Note: strategic geopolitical position along world's busiest shipping lanes; 



Eritrea retained the entire coastline of Ethiopia along the Red Sea upon de jure 

independence from Ethiopia on 24 May 1993 

Religions: Muslim, Coptic Christian, Roman Catholic,  Protestant  

Exports:  $17.65 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

Partners: Italy 31.4%, US 11.9%, Belarus 5.9%, France 5.1%, Germany 4.6%, 

Turkey 


4.4%, UK 4% (2005) 

Commodities: livestock, sorghum, textiles, food, small manufactures (2000) Imports:  

Imports:  $701.8 million f.o.b. (2006 est.) 

Partners: Italy 15.1%, France 11.8%, US 9.5%, Germany 8.6%, Taiwan 7.3%, 

India 7%, Ireland 6.1%, Turkey 4.4%, Jordan 4.2% (2005) 

Commodities: machinery, petroleum products, food, manufactured     

      goods 

 

Source: CIA World Fact Book (July 17, 2007) 



https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/et.html

 

 



 


 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

The Rise of Axum 

Ethiopia is one of the oldest inhabited areas on Earth so naturally, Axum arose from a series of 

influential ethnic and cultural groups. Major influences include the Sabaean people from 

Southern Arabia, the local Da'amot people, and the declining Kingdom of Kush in modern-day 

Sudan. As Kush lost power, it presented the people of Axum an opportunity to grow and they 

took it. Various Axum kings slowly expanded their influence in the first several centuries AD, 

formally conquering Kush by 350. With this, they became the political and economic power of 

the region. In fact, the Iranian prophet of the 3rd century, Mani, named Axum one of the four 

great powers of the time, along with Persia, Rome, and China. Axum interfered in the Arabian 

Peninsula and northern Africa, expanding its control to an area of almost a million square miles 

that included parts of modern Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. Axum adopted 

Christianity around 325 AD under the powerful King Ezana as well, connecting it culturally to a 

growing number of Christian kingdoms.  

The majority of their wealth came from the rise of a new sailing technique that used seasonal 

winds to cross the Red and Arabian Seas, increasing the amount of trade that could pass through 

that region. Axum was right at the intersection of trade routes between the Mediterranean and 

these seas and was able to dominate the market on international trade. 

 

The Decline of Axum 

In the 7th century, the new religion Islam began spreading extremely quickly across the Middle 

East and Africa. The new Islamic powers grew in power and size and constantly clashed against 

rival Christian kingdoms. Axum, however, maintained good relations with their Islamic 

neighbors, since the city had safely harbored the early followers of the religion back in the year 

615. Nevertheless, as the Islamic kingdoms grew in prominence they came to economically 

dominate the region, undermining the power of Axum. As Islamic powers gained control of the 

most important ports, Axum began a gradual decline near the end of the 7th century.  

As the kingdom lost wealth, the cities became more vulnerable to raiders and eventually the 

capital city was abandoned as people moved into stronger kingdoms. The southern region of the 

kingdom was still connected to overland trade routes with the Arabic kingdoms, but they never 

had quite the same power.  

According to local legends, a Jewish queen finally defeated the last Axum cities in the late 10th 

century, bringing an end to the kingdom. Scientists have also identified signs of climate shift 

around this time, leading to the decline of once-abundant resources, soil erosion, and drought. 

 

Natural resources 

Despite its recent tragic reputation, parts of Ethiopia are rich in natural resources, and Aksum 

was well placed to exploit them. Timber was needed to make charcoal for the production of iron 

tools and weapons, and this was abundant. Cereal crops grew easily in the well-watered, fertile 

soil – the growing season could be as long as nine months, and two crops a year could be grown 

on the terraces cut into the hillsides. There was good pasture for cattle. The population was 

therefore well fed. While one of the greatest worries of the rulers of Rome was how to feed their 

population, the kings of Aksum had no such problem. And if the rains failed, they had a secret 

weapon – teff.  

 

Teff is a grain that grows nowhere else except Ethiopia. Not only is it a crop that is far more 



nutritious than other cereals, it needs very little water. 


 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

 

Mapping Activity 

 

You will be mapping the rise and decline of the Aksum Kingdom. You should have the 

following materials to complete the activity: 

1.

 



Your timeline worksheet 

2.

 



Map of northeast Africa/southwest Asia (Aksum and Kush already labeled) 

3.

 



Colored pencils 

4.

 



Student atlas, book, technology 

 

Locate and label the following on your map with a brown pencil: Ethiopia, Eritrea, 



Djibouti, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Egypt, Sudan, Red Sea, Blue Nile, Nile, Gulf of Aden, 

Ethiopian Highlands 

 

Use the information on your timeline to complete the rest of the map activity. 



 

Rise and Expansion of Aksum 

Using a red pencil, draw arrows from Aksum to areas/countries conquered by Aksum. 

Label the appropriate date. Mark the location of the areas/countries, that traded with 

Aksum. Label the appropriate date. 

 

Decline of Aksum 

Using a purple pencil, draw arrows back to Aksum showing the effect of Persia on 

Aksum trade. Label the arrow with the appropriate date. 

 

Using a black pencil, draw an “X” over Aksum and Kush, and label the date each moved 



or fell. 

 

Map Thinking Questions: When you are finished with your map, complete the 

following questions in complete sentences. 

 

What did Aksum gain by conquering Kush? 



 

 

List ways the Aksum civilization’s location helped in their development of trade. 



 

 

 



Looking at the map, list some possible means of transportation/trade. 

 

 



How did trade affect the development of the Aksum civilization? 

 

 




 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

 



 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

Using a green pencil, draw arrows from Aksum to the areas/countries, or in the direction  




 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

 



 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance

 

 



 

Draft, September, 2015, Adams Michigan Geographic Alliance



 

 



Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə