Aval: Audio-Visual Active Locator



Yüklə 113,78 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix14.02.2018
ölçüsü113,78 Kb.
#26937


1

 

 



 

AVAL: Audio-Visual Active Locator 

ECE-492/3 Senior Design Project 

Spring 2014 

 

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 



Volgenau School of Engineering 

George Mason University 

Fairfax, VA 

 

 



Team members:  

 

Rony Alaghbar, Kelly Byrnes and Jacob Cohen 



Faculty Supervisor:    

Dr. Kathleen E. Wage 

 

Abstract: 



Videoconferencing is a growing trend among businesses, as 

the  systems  reduce  need  for  travel,  in  turn  reducing  cost 

and  carbon  footprints,  and  increasing  productivity.  There 

has  been  steadily  increasing  growth  in  the  industry. 

However, the main drawbacks appear to be the large start-

up  cost  for  equipment  and  installation,  the  need  for 

professional  IT  maintenance  and  setup,  and  overall  lack  in 

system  mobility.  The  proposed  design  alleviates  the  cost 

while  enhancing  functionality  of  existing  systems.  This 

project  aims  to  design  a  compact,  platform  independent, 

and  affordable  tabletop  device  for  a  terminal  of  a 

videoconferencing  system.  The  Audio-Visual  Active  Locator 

(AVAL)  takes  input  audio,  and  uses  a  microphone  phased 

array  to  locate  the  speaker’s  position.  This  information  is 

used  to  position  a  camera  toward  the  calculated  location. 

This  functionality  aims  to  enhance  current  conferencing 

techniques,  while  embracing  seamless  integration  into 

existing systems.  

 

 

 



 

1. Introduction 

Videoconferencing  is  a  widely  used  business  practice  for  meetings  and  education.  The  General  Services 

Administration cited increased videoconferencing would reduce both travel expenses and pollutant emissions [2]. 

A  single  terminal  of  a room-based videoconferencing  system  requires  audio  and  video  input/output,  processing, 

and  synchronization.  Current  systems  typically  utilize  monitors  as  the  hub  for  the  videoconferencing  terminal. 

These monitors are either bulky portable systems or mounted within the room. The coupling of the terminal with 

the large monitor increases the overall cost, and significantly hinders the mobility of the device. Not only do group 

video  systems  require  mounting  or  cumbersome  relocation,  but  they  also  require  personnel  training  and  IT 

support. Smaller, more transportable terminals are typically desktop-based and geared towards individual users. In 

order  to  produce  a  product  capable  of  mitigating  these  concerns,  AVAL  utilizes  two,  four-element  microphone 

arrays  centered on the  table  to  steer  a  servo-controlled  camera  towards  the  current  speaker.  Source  localization 

signal processing algorithms are used to find the person speaking.  

 

2. Approach 



A  microphone  array  was  designed  specifically  for  speech  signals  between  400  and  1000  Hz.  The  array  design 

assumes  point-to-point  propagation.  Equation  1  displays  the  necessary  length  of  the  array  to  assume  point-to-

point propagation. R represents the distance from the sensor, while D represents the array length and λ represents 

the wavelength. This equation shows the minimum wavelength as the limiting factor, being about 34 cm for 1KHz. 




 

Assuming the distance to the array is near 120 cm, the maximum array length to assume planar propagation is 45 

cm long. Experimentation resulted in an array length of 51 cm

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

The aperture of the array, 51 cm, can be viewed as a rectangular spatial filter (Figure 1). Fourier transform of the 



spatial filter, also seen in Figure 1, is given with radians along the x

array  is represented  by L  in  the  figures  above, while 

lower  limit  frequency  of  400Hz,  corresponding  to  a  wavelength  of  85cm,  and  an  array  length  of  51  cm,  the 

resulting beam-width is a maximum of π/2 radians. 

of the aperture. This discretization effectively turns

 

Figure 1: Spatial Rectang



There are many types of beamforming algorithms used today, but they all mimic filtering the signal in space and 

time.  Beamforming  a  microphone  array  towards  a  given  angle  of  incidence  is  analogous  to 

signal  coming  from  alternate  angles.  Delay  and  Sum  Beamforming, 

sampling.  To  synchronize  accurately  between  the  microphones

high  resolution  to  the  applied  delays 

associated with each sensor, which will make the signals coming from the furthest sensor just as powerful as the 

closest. This will mitigate the added noi

Sum  beamforming  adds  the  delays  to  each  sensor  using  phase  shifts  associated  with  each  filter.  Since  all  the 

computations are done within the time domain

 

Figure 2: Steering a Phased Array (www.labbookpages.co.uk)



AVAL implements source localization using frequency domain analysis and beamforming. Working in the frequency 

domain allows for analysis of broadband

(filtering in space and time) creates a Fourie

is determined by weighting the individual transforms 

or  phase  shift,  and  finally summing  these 

implemented  a  “fixed  angle”  approach.  This  has  mitigated  the  need  for  dynamic  filtering,  which  would  require 

Assuming the distance to the array is near 120 cm, the maximum array length to assume planar propagation is 45 



cm long. Experimentation resulted in an array length of 51 cm as the best fit for finding the angle of

 

 



 

 

 



 

The aperture of the array, 51 cm, can be viewed as a rectangular spatial filter (Figure 1). Fourier transform of the 

spatial filter, also seen in Figure 1, is given with radians along the x-axis and gain along the y

in  the  figures  above, while λ/L  dictates  the  beam-width  of the  array  in  radians. With  a 

lower  limit  frequency  of  400Hz,  corresponding  to  a  wavelength  of  85cm,  and  an  array  length  of  51  cm,  the 

a maximum of π/2 radians. Discrete microphone points are placed along the entire length 

of the aperture. This discretization effectively turns the array in to a spatial and temporal sampling problem. 

: Spatial Rectangular Filter and Corresponding Fourier Transform 

There are many types of beamforming algorithms used today, but they all mimic filtering the signal in space and 

time.  Beamforming  a  microphone  array  towards  a  given  angle  of  incidence  is  analogous  to 

.  Delay  and  Sum  Beamforming,  Figure  2,  is  susceptible  to  errors  in  time 

between  the  microphones,  a  high  sampling  frequency  is  needed  along  with 

esolution  to  the  applied  delays  to  avoid  destructive  interference.  This  method  also  has  no  weightings 

associated with each sensor, which will make the signals coming from the furthest sensor just as powerful as the 

This will mitigate the added noise in the signal from propagating longer to the furthest sensor. Filter and 

Sum  beamforming  adds  the  delays  to  each  sensor  using  phase  shifts  associated  with  each  filter.  Since  all  the 

computations are done within the time domain, it is still susceptible to inaccuracies in phase delays. 

: Steering a Phased Array (www.labbookpages.co.uk) and Filter and Sum Beamforming (Eneman, Koen)

source localization using frequency domain analysis and beamforming. Working in the frequency 

s for analysis of broadband signals and improved accuracy of the calculation. Spatiotemporal Filtering 

(filtering in space and time) creates a Fourier Transform of the beamformed output. The output Fourier Transform 

is determined by weighting the individual transforms and conducting a matrix multiplied with a complex exponent, 

nd  finally summing  these manipulated  transforms.  In  order  to localize on  the  speaker,  AVAL  has 

implemented  a  “fixed  angle”  approach.  This  has  mitigated  the  need  for  dynamic  filtering,  which  would  require 



R

>

2D



2

λ

Assuming the distance to the array is near 120 cm, the maximum array length to assume planar propagation is 45 



as the best fit for finding the angle of incidence.  

(1) 


The aperture of the array, 51 cm, can be viewed as a rectangular spatial filter (Figure 1). Fourier transform of the 

axis and gain along the y-axis. The length of the 

width  of the  array  in  radians. With  a 

lower  limit  frequency  of  400Hz,  corresponding  to  a  wavelength  of  85cm,  and  an  array  length  of  51  cm,  the 

Discrete microphone points are placed along the entire length 

the array in to a spatial and temporal sampling problem.  

 

 

There are many types of beamforming algorithms used today, but they all mimic filtering the signal in space and 



time.  Beamforming  a  microphone  array  towards  a  given  angle  of  incidence  is  analogous  to  filtering  out  every 

Figure  2,  is  susceptible  to  errors  in  time 

,  a  high  sampling  frequency  is  needed  along  with 

.  This  method  also  has  no  weightings 

associated with each sensor, which will make the signals coming from the furthest sensor just as powerful as the 

se in the signal from propagating longer to the furthest sensor. Filter and 

Sum  beamforming  adds  the  delays  to  each  sensor  using  phase  shifts  associated  with  each  filter.  Since  all  the 

o inaccuracies in phase delays.  

 

and Filter and Sum Beamforming (Eneman, Koen) 



source localization using frequency domain analysis and beamforming. Working in the frequency 

signals and improved accuracy of the calculation. Spatiotemporal Filtering 

r Transform of the beamformed output. The output Fourier Transform 

with a complex exponent, 

o localize on  the  speaker,  AVAL  has 

implemented  a  “fixed  angle”  approach.  This  has  mitigated  the  need  for  dynamic  filtering,  which  would  require 




 

changing the filters based on an input. AVAL’s fixed angle method utilizes multiple pre

 

2. System Design 



AVAL  operates  in  a  standard  office  environment,  is  easy  to  implement,  and 

autonomously tracks who is speaking with a camera using microphone arrays and interfaces with teleconferencing 

software.  To  ensure  ease  of  use,  including  installation  and  operation,  AVAL  implements  a  table

takes video and speech audio signals and outputs a cohesive audio

 

AVAL  consists of three main  components  and  a  power  system,  as  seen  in 



the PC and Data Acquisition System (DAQ)

the microphone array consisting of eight electret condenser microphones.

audio input, and the camera position system takes the video, the processing unit acts as a mediator between the 

two.  It  determines  the  location  of  the  speaker  from  the  microphone  input  and  forwards  the  information  to  the 

camera positioning system. The processing unit also consolidates and outputs the singular audio

The processing unit introduces the main functionality of AVAL. It requires data acquisition from the micro

which is sent through an algorithm to produce a location for the speaker source. Then the location is sent to the 

camera  positioning  system.  These  processes  are  implemented  on  a  standard  PC.  A  PC  was  chosen  over  a 

microcontroller, as common microcontrollers are not powerful enough

latency  required  to  operate  in  real  time. 

location  data  from  the PC.  The  microphones 

from the eight channels of pre-amplification circuit 

connected via USB to the PC. 

 

In  order  to  properly  mount  various  subcomponents,  3D  printing  was  employed  to  create  hardware  specif



designed  to  work  with  AVAL’s  various  subcomponents.  The  AVAL  camera  and  servo  mounts  were  designed  in 

OpenSCAD and 3D printed on a Makerbot Replicator 2X. The CAD r

 

Figure 4


 

changing the filters based on an input. AVAL’s fixed angle method utilizes multiple pre-determined filters.  



AVAL  operates  in  a  standard  office  environment,  is  easy  to  implement,  and  is  affordable.  The  system 

autonomously tracks who is speaking with a camera using microphone arrays and interfaces with teleconferencing 

use,  including  installation  and  operation,  AVAL  implements  a  table

takes video and speech audio signals and outputs a cohesive audio-video stream of the current speaker.

AVAL  consists of three main  components  and  a  power  system,  as  seen  in Figure  3: the  processing  unit  including 

Data Acquisition System (DAQ), the camera positioning unit with a Servo Controller and webcam, and 

the microphone array consisting of eight electret condenser microphones. While the microphone array takes 

audio input, and the camera position system takes the video, the processing unit acts as a mediator between the 

two.  It  determines  the  location  of  the  speaker  from  the  microphone  input  and  forwards  the  information  to  the 

processing unit also consolidates and outputs the singular audio

 

Figure 3: System Design 



The processing unit introduces the main functionality of AVAL. It requires data acquisition from the micro

algorithm to produce a location for the speaker source. Then the location is sent to the 

camera  positioning  system.  These  processes  are  implemented  on  a  standard  PC.  A  PC  was  chosen  over  a 

microcontroller, as common microcontrollers are not powerful enough to handle the required processing with the 

latency  required  to  operate  in  real  time.  One  camera  is  utilized  to  track  the  conversation  in  the  room  using  the 

location  data  from  the PC.  The  microphones  are  connected  directly  to  the  pre-amplification  circuit.

amplification circuit are connected directly to the DAQ. All other components 

In  order  to  properly  mount  various  subcomponents,  3D  printing  was  employed  to  create  hardware  specif

designed  to  work  with  AVAL’s  various  subcomponents.  The  AVAL  camera  and  servo  mounts  were  designed  in 

OpenSCAD and 3D printed on a Makerbot Replicator 2X. The CAD renders can be seen in Figure 4

4: 3D prints of camera mount and servo mount 

determined filters.   

affordable.  The  system 

autonomously tracks who is speaking with a camera using microphone arrays and interfaces with teleconferencing 

use,  including  installation  and  operation,  AVAL  implements  a  table-top  design  and 

video stream of the current speaker. 

the  processing  unit  including 

, the camera positioning unit with a Servo Controller and webcam, and 

While the microphone array takes the 

audio input, and the camera position system takes the video, the processing unit acts as a mediator between the 

two.  It  determines  the  location  of  the  speaker  from  the  microphone  input  and  forwards  the  information  to  the 

processing unit also consolidates and outputs the singular audio-video feed. 

The processing unit introduces the main functionality of AVAL. It requires data acquisition from the microphones, 

algorithm to produce a location for the speaker source. Then the location is sent to the 

camera  positioning  system.  These  processes  are  implemented  on  a  standard  PC.  A  PC  was  chosen  over  a 

to handle the required processing with the 

utilized  to  track  the  conversation  in  the  room  using  the 

amplification  circuit.  The outputs 

connected directly to the DAQ. All other components are 

In  order  to  properly  mount  various  subcomponents,  3D  printing  was  employed  to  create  hardware  specifically 

designed  to  work  with  AVAL’s  various  subcomponents.  The  AVAL  camera  and  servo  mounts  were  designed  in 

enders can be seen in Figure 4. 

 



 

3. Microphone Array 

The most important module of the AVAL is the microphone a

as  linear,  annular,  and  planar  have  limits on  the  range of  localization.  In  addition  to  designing  the  geometries of 

the microphone array, the spacing between each microphone was considered to limit aliasing of the audio signals.

 

The array spacing and dimensions were designed by considering spatial sampling, angular resolution of the array, 



and  sound  propagation  to  the  array.  Since  sound  signals  are  broadband  signals,  the  array  was  designed  for 

frequencies from 400Hz to 1KHz. According to 

spacing  between  the  two sensors  needs to  be  less than  half  the minimum 

that  the microphones  can be  spaced  a maximum of 17cm  apart, 

with a 1 KHz source. The angular resolution of the array is 

length of the aperture increases, the beam

Figure 

The  last  parameter  considered  was  the  limitation  of  Far  Field  Assumption.  Since  sound  waves  are  originally 



spherical, our array must be far enough to assume

for the assumption of point-to-point propagation, simplifying calculations and modeling in array signal processing.

After experimenting  with different spaci

preliminary algorithm. Figure 6 shows the results of the spacing testing and its ability to output the correct angle. 

Data  was  taken  for  three  different  angles  over  four  different  trials

calculated.  The  graph  shows  that  the  least  amount  of  error  occurred  at  17cm,  which  determined  the  final 

dimensions of the microphone arrays. 

The audio signals obtained through the microphone array must now be converted into data the device can use. It 

is  imperative  that  these  audio  signals  are  sampled  synchronously.  If  not,  all  calculations  will  be  incorrect  and 

output  audio  may  be  distorted  or  mistimed  with  the  video.  Before  amplification,  all  extraneous  signals  beyond 

2KHz  (high  frequency  noise)  and  below  60Hz  (DC  components)  are  eliminated  using  a  high  pass  and  low  pass 

passive  filter.  These  anti-alias  filters  condition  the  signal  before  ampl

-L/2

-L/4


L/4

L/2


1

Array of Aperture L

-L

-L/2


L/2

L

1



Array of Aperture 2L-1

-3L/2


-3L/4

3L/4


1

Array of Aperture 3L-1

0

5

10



15

20

25



R

M

S



 E

rr

o



(D

e



g

re

e



s)

AVAL is the microphone array. Different geometries of microphone arrays such 



as  linear,  annular,  and  planar  have  limits on  the  range of  localization.  In  addition  to  designing  the  geometries of 

microphone array, the spacing between each microphone was considered to limit aliasing of the audio signals.

The array spacing and dimensions were designed by considering spatial sampling, angular resolution of the array, 

ay.  Since  sound  signals  are  broadband  signals,  the  array  was  designed  for 

According to the Nyquist Sampling Theorem, in order to sample effectively, the 

spacing  between  the  two sensors  needs to  be  less than  half  the minimum  wavelength of  the  signal.  This  means 

that  the microphones  can be  spaced  a maximum of 17cm  apart, half  of our wavelength of  34 cm

. The angular resolution of the array is also determined by the length of the aperture. 

length of the aperture increases, the beam-width decreases, as shown in Figure 5 below. 

Figure 5: Length of Aperture vs Directivity 

The  last  parameter  considered  was  the  limitation  of  Far  Field  Assumption.  Since  sound  waves  are  originally 

r array must be far enough to assume that the waves are planar. Utilizing planar propagation allows 

point propagation, simplifying calculations and modeling in array signal processing.

After experimenting  with different spacing  arrays  of four microphones,  data was  taken  and  processed  through  a

shows the results of the spacing testing and its ability to output the correct angle. 

Data  was  taken  for  three  different  angles  over  four  different  trials.  The  RMS  error  of  the  outputted  angle  was 

calculated.  The  graph  shows  that  the  least  amount  of  error  occurred  at  17cm,  which  determined  the  final 

 

Figure 6: RMS Error of Spacing Testing 



The audio signals obtained through the microphone array must now be converted into data the device can use. It 

is  imperative  that  these  audio  signals  are  sampled  synchronously.  If  not,  all  calculations  will  be  incorrect  and 

mistimed  with  the  video.  Before  amplification,  all  extraneous  signals  beyond 

2KHz  (high  frequency  noise)  and  below  60Hz  (DC  components)  are  eliminated  using  a  high  pass  and  low  pass 

alias  filters  condition  the  signal  before  amplification.  Before  the  audio  signals  are 

3L/2


-0.25

-0.2


-0.15

-0.1


-0.05

0

0.05



0.1

0.15


L

Angle of Directivity / 

π

 

Directivity Pattern of Each Array



 

Length L Array

Length 2L-1 Array

Length 3L-1 Array

10.5

17

20



25

Sensor Spacing (cm)

RMS Error 

50 Degrees

90 Degrees

130 Degrees

rray. Different geometries of microphone arrays such 

as  linear,  annular,  and  planar  have  limits on  the  range of  localization.  In  addition  to  designing  the  geometries of 

microphone array, the spacing between each microphone was considered to limit aliasing of the audio signals.

 

The array spacing and dimensions were designed by considering spatial sampling, angular resolution of the array, 



ay.  Since  sound  signals  are  broadband  signals,  the  array  was  designed  for 

Nyquist Sampling Theorem, in order to sample effectively, the 

wavelength of  the  signal.  This  means 

half  of our wavelength of  34 cm, when  dealing 

determined by the length of the aperture. As the 

 

The  last  parameter  considered  was  the  limitation  of  Far  Field  Assumption.  Since  sound  waves  are  originally 



planar. Utilizing planar propagation allows 

point propagation, simplifying calculations and modeling in array signal processing. 

ng  arrays  of four microphones,  data was  taken  and  processed  through  a 

shows the results of the spacing testing and its ability to output the correct angle. 

.  The  RMS  error  of  the  outputted  angle  was 

calculated.  The  graph  shows  that  the  least  amount  of  error  occurred  at  17cm,  which  determined  the  final 

The audio signals obtained through the microphone array must now be converted into data the device can use. It 

is  imperative  that  these  audio  signals  are  sampled  synchronously.  If  not,  all  calculations  will  be  incorrect  and 

mistimed  with  the  video.  Before  amplification,  all  extraneous  signals  beyond 

2KHz  (high  frequency  noise)  and  below  60Hz  (DC  components)  are  eliminated  using  a  high  pass  and  low  pass 

ification.  Before  the  audio  signals  are 

0.2


0.25

 

Length L Array



Length 2L-1 Array

Length 3L-1 Array




 

processed,  they  must  be  amplified.  Since  the  audio  signals  from  the  microphones  are  weak  (micro-volts),  a 



preamp amplifier connected to the microphones strengthens the signal (up to 10 Volts peak-to-peak) for further 

processing  [3].  Once  the  analog  signal  is  ready  for  processing,  it  is  converted  to  a  set  of  digital  data.  For  this 

process  a  Data  Acquisition  System  (DAQ)  is  used.  Many  DAQs  use  a  “round  robin”  approach  when  sampling 

multiple channels. However, “round robin” does not guarantee synchronous data acquisition, which is key to the 

required beamforming processing. An 8-channel ADC samples the signal and quantifies the values to send to the 

location  calculator.  The  DAQ  used  to  prepare  the  signal  must  support  the  number  of  channels  required.  Since 

maximum frequency of speech signals are around 3400Hz, a minimum sampling rate of 6800Hz is needed across 

each channel of input. However, as conversational frequencies lie under 2KHz, a smaller sampling frequency may 

suffice. We are using analog, omnidirectional electret condenser microphones as inputs to our system.  

 

Once the sampled audio signals are stored, the signals are sent to the Location Calculator module of the device. 



The  location  calculation  is  processed  within  the  PC,  as  speed  and  signal  processing  power  are  vital  for  signal 

tracking.  The  processor  implements  spatiotemporal  filters  for  source  localization.  This  decreases  the  need  for 

extremely high sampling rates required for time-domain processing. The spatiotemporal method is utilized for the 

location calculation and also for our optional audio enhancement.  

 

One  camera  mounted  on  the  device  is  able  to  rotate  360°  in  the  azimuth  direction.  Motors  with  precision  in 



position, such as servos, are used to actuate the mounts of the webcams. The camera control device was designed 

to  be  quiet,  as  to  not  distort  the  microphone  input.  During  operation,  the  camera  always  points  to  the  speaker 

while they are talking if nobody else has spoken yet. 

 

4. Audio Processing Algorithms 



The scan function or source localization function acts to find a persistent sound source at a new location (Figure 7). 

First, the processing unit takes a short time Fourier transform of the data coming in from the DAQ, about 150ms. 

Then, a spatial transform is applied to the frequencies under 2KHz. The resulting two-dimensional array consists of 

a wavelength vs. frequency plot. Peaks within the plot above 95% of the maximum value are chosen and the plot 

is summed across at the discretized angles that the system is sampling (50, 70, 90, 110, 130 degrees). The largest 

sum across the oblique lines corresponding to each angle determines the position of the speaker.  



 

Figure 7: Scan Algorithm 

Figure 8 shows a spectrogram of a speech signal recorded. Most of the spectral content within a voice falls under 

2KHz.  The  spectral  content  does  not  change  drastically  as  words  change  with  time.  Additionally, there  are  three 

major noise bands that are consistent with time; this is due to the room acoustics and equipment running in the 



 

room.  Therefore,  in  our  algorithm,  only  frequencies  under  2KHz  were  processed  in  further  stages.  Figure  8  also 



shows a 2048 point temporal FFT of a 150ms speech signal with the frequencies over 2KHz cutoff. The FFT consists 

of three dominant peaks where most of the spectral content is contained. Every other frequency that arises in the 

FFT is at least 10dB less than the three dominant peaks. 

 

 



Figure 8: Spectrogram of speech signal (left), and FFT of speech signal (right) 

Figure  9  shows  the  result  of  a  spatial  FFT  taken  across  the  temporal  FFT  data.  This  process  results  in  a  wave 

number vs. frequency plot that has characteristics which relate to the source angle. Below is the result of applying 

a  peak  algorithm  to  the  previous  dataset.  The  final  dataset  consists of 1’s  at each  peak  and 0’s otherwise.  If  the 

data is taken while a person is speaking from an angle, a series of peaks results along the linear relationship. The 

output  angle  is  determined  by  summing  across  the  five  discretized  angles  and  selecting  the  largest  sum  as  the 

speaker’s angle. 

 

 



Figure9: Spatial FFT of Temporal FFT (left) and peak algorithm (right) 

 

5. Experimental Evaluation and Validation 



Individually, each component, including the arrays, DAQ, and the servo, were found to fall well within operational 

requirements. The first experiment focused on location accuracy. Three speakers spoke at angles varying from 50° 

to 130° and 230° to 310° with intervals of 10° on each side of the array. This data is represented in Figure 10. The 



 

gold X’s signify AVAL’s predefined angles and the green X’s signify the midpoints between two predefined angles. 

Examining  the  chart  above  it  becomes  clear  that  all

value. This falls well within the 15° tolerance defined in the requirements. Moving to the midpoints it 

noted that the camera is always pointed towards one of AVAL’s predefined angles.

were the system will default to broadside (90°). When the system cannot determine an accurate speaker location 

(110°  and  130°  in  this  example),  the  ambient  noise  in  the  room  will  win  out,  which  defaults  the  system  to 

broadside.  Overall,  the  system  test  proved  successful  as  the  speaker  was  always  detected  at  an  AVAL 

predetermined angle.  

Figure 10

The  second  test  consisted  of  measuring  time  to  location.  In  each  test  the  camera  started  at  broadside  of  the 

opposite  array.  Each  speaker  spoke  at  one  of  AVAL’s  predefined  angles  and  the  time  to  locate  the  speaker  was 

measured.  Observing  the  data  below  it  can  be  seen  that  AVAL  has

seconds,  well  within  the  4  seconds  stated  in  the  requirements.  The  algorithm  response  time  is  under  a  quarter 

second;  AVAL  takes  its  time  locating  the  speaker  in  order  to  ensure  smooth,  necessary  transitions  betwee

speakers.  With  these  experiments  completed,  it  can  be  said  that  the  AVAL  system  is  functional  well  within  its 

predefined requirements. 

Figure


References 

[1]  Davis, Andrew, and Ira Weinstein. “Videoconferencing 

[2]  General Services Administration.United States of America.FY 2012 Congressional Justification. (2011). 

[3]  Lewis, Jerad. Understanding Microphone Sensitivity. Analog Devices, (2011).

0.00

50.00


100.00

150.00


200.00

250.00


300.00

350.00


A

n

g



u

la



Lo

ca

ti



o

n

0



1

2

3



4

5

0



50

T

im



e

 (

s)



gold X’s signify AVAL’s predefined angles and the green X’s signify the midpoints between two predefined angles. 

Examining  the  chart  above  it  becomes  clear  that  all  predefined  angles  are  precise  within 

falls well within the 15° tolerance defined in the requirements. Moving to the midpoints it 

noted that the camera is always pointed towards one of AVAL’s predefined angles. An anomaly can be seen at 120°, 

were the system will default to broadside (90°). When the system cannot determine an accurate speaker location 

(110°  and  130°  in  this  example),  the  ambient  noise  in  the  room  will  win  out,  which  defaults  the  system  to 

ide.  Overall,  the  system  test  proved  successful  as  the  speaker  was  always  detected  at  an  AVAL 

10: Location Accuracy Experimentation Results 

of  measuring  time  to  location.  In  each  test  the  camera  started  at  broadside  of  the 

opposite  array.  Each  speaker  spoke  at  one  of  AVAL’s  predefined  angles  and  the  time  to  locate  the  speaker  was 

it  can  be  seen  that  AVAL  has  an  average  response  time  of  roughly  2.25 

seconds,  well  within  the  4  seconds  stated  in  the  requirements.  The  algorithm  response  time  is  under  a  quarter 

second;  AVAL  takes  its  time  locating  the  speaker  in  order  to  ensure  smooth,  necessary  transitions  betwee

speakers.  With  these  experiments  completed,  it  can  be  said  that  the  AVAL  system  is  functional  well  within  its 

Figure 11: Time to Location Experiment Results 

Davis, Andrew, and Ira Weinstein. “Videoconferencing by the Numbers.” Wainhouse Research (2011). Web. 26 Sept. 2013.

General Services Administration.United States of America.FY 2012 Congressional Justification. (2011). 

Lewis, Jerad. Understanding Microphone Sensitivity. Analog Devices, (2011). 

Speaker Locating Experimentation

Experimental Average

Speaker Location

100

150


200

250


300

Angle of Speaker (degrees)

Average Time to Locate Speaker

gold X’s signify AVAL’s predefined angles and the green X’s signify the midpoints between two predefined angles. 

  2-3°  of  the  theoretical 

falls well within the 15° tolerance defined in the requirements. Moving to the midpoints it should be 

An anomaly can be seen at 120°, 

were the system will default to broadside (90°). When the system cannot determine an accurate speaker location 

(110°  and  130°  in  this  example),  the  ambient  noise  in  the  room  will  win  out,  which  defaults  the  system  to 

ide.  Overall,  the  system  test  proved  successful  as  the  speaker  was  always  detected  at  an  AVAL 

 

of  measuring  time  to  location.  In  each  test  the  camera  started  at  broadside  of  the 



opposite  array.  Each  speaker  spoke  at  one  of  AVAL’s  predefined  angles  and  the  time  to  locate  the  speaker  was 

an  average  response  time  of  roughly  2.25 

seconds,  well  within  the  4  seconds  stated  in  the  requirements.  The  algorithm  response  time  is  under  a  quarter 

second;  AVAL  takes  its  time  locating  the  speaker  in  order  to  ensure  smooth,  necessary  transitions  between 

speakers.  With  these  experiments  completed,  it  can  be  said  that  the  AVAL  system  is  functional  well  within  its 

 

by the Numbers.” Wainhouse Research (2011). Web. 26 Sept. 2013. 



General Services Administration.United States of America.FY 2012 Congressional Justification. (2011).  

350


Yüklə 113,78 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2023
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə