Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə10/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   114

In Spinoza, consequently, unlike in Bayle or Locke, freedom of thought
is not just broadly couched but also expressly tied, through freedom
of expression, to an anti-monarchical, anti-ecclesiastical and anti-
aristocratic politics. Spinoza’s political thought endeavours to maximize
individual liberty under the state by demonstrating, and emphasizing, the
positive interaction between Man’s individual and collective interests and
the power of the sovereign. In his view, the state’s true strength and
stability depends on the willingness of citizens to identify with, participate
in, and support it. Hence, in Spinoza, toleration and freedom of thought
and expression are grounded on a particular conception of political power
and of the role and functions of the state. Since the ‘right’ of the state is
identical to the power of the state, according to his conception, and since
no one can control the thoughts or desires of someone else, it follows that
it lies entirely outside the proper scope of the state even to try to control
men’s thoughts and discussions.When setting up the state, holds Spinoza,
each individual surrendered, for the sake of added security, co-operation
and also freedom, his or her natural right to act unrestrictedly, as he or she
pleases ^ but not his or her right to reason, judge and express opinions.
And since everybody retains the right to think and judge independently, it
follows that it remains everyone’s right to express whatever views one
wishes about religion, politics, law and everything else pertaining to the
‘common interest’ and the state, provided such freedom is exercised
without undermining the law or prejudice to the state. Expressing views
about this or that decree, event, political decision, or o⁄ce-holder only
becomes seditious and hence liable for punishment, he maintains, if it
directly obstructs implementation of laws and decrees.
Whether the sharp divide this theory presupposes between action, on
one side, and thought and expression, on the other, is likely to be clearly
apparent in practice may well strike us as doubtful. When exactly, by
Spinoza’s criterion, is political or religious propaganda seditious and when
not? But however he proposed to substantiate it in particular instances,
this divide between action, on the one hand, and thought and expression,
on the other, remained fundamental to Spinoza’s (and the Spinozists’)
conception of individual liberty. Where Hobbes, preferring monarchs to
democracy, suppresses the ‘natural right’ of individuals under society and
the state, postulating a ‘contract’ which cancels it, Spinoza always
preserves the ‘natural right’ intact as far as he can. Whatever thoughts,
utterances, speeches and publications can safely be allowed in society
xxix
Introduction


should b e p e r mitte d, he c onclude s e arly in the 
twe n t i e th chapte r
 of the
Theological-Political Treatise, since ‘the true purpose of the state is in fact
freedom’.
35
Ultimately, the close connection between individual liberty and politics
in Spinoza’s philosophy revolves around the idea that personal freedom,
and satisfaction of individual desires, is greater or less, and the individual
more or less secure, depending on the degree to which the state strives
to maintain ‘the common good’, something which Spinoza argues is
inherently more likely to happen the more the state is broad-based and
democratic in character. Conversely, the more autocratic the state ^
though he regards pure monarchy along the lines eulogized by Hobbes as
an impossible fantasy ^ the weaker it is. This means that the rational
individual will learn to see that his or her private personal aspirations and
interests are more likely to prosper the more individual liberty in general is
buttressed, something which can only happen where the free republic
receives the support of individuals like him or herself. Eventually, this will
lead the more rational part of the population to grasp that true individual
self-interest directly depends on the prosperity or otherwise of the
‘common good’ as furthered, defended and presided over by the state.
The urban, commercial, egalitarian ‘democratic republicanism’ Spinoza
expounds in the Theological-Political Treatise and his laterTractatus Politicus is
of great importance but was no isolated phenomenon. Historians of political
thought in recent decades have devoted a great deal of attention to the
development of republican theories in early modern times. However,
attention has focused primarily on the Anglo-American ‘classical
republican’ tradition, which, with its agrarian country gentry background,
tended to be aristocratic in orientation, anti-commercial and ‘soft’ on
monarchy. Curiously enough, there has been much less interest in the
historical origins of the kind of full-blooded ‘democratic republicanism’ that
developed not in the gentry-dominated but rather in the urban, mercantile
context especially of the Dutch Republic, where pro-burgher, aggressively
anti-monarchist and anti-aristocratic writers like Franciscus van den Enden
(
1602^74), Johan (1622^60) and Pieter de la Court (1618^85), Spinoza,
Ericus Walten (
1663^97) and Frederik van Leenhof (1647^1713), and later
Bernard Mandeville developed a body of political theory of which Spinoza’s
contribution is only part. Anglo-American ‘classical republicanism’ may be a
35
Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, ch.
20
, para.
6.
xxx
Introduction


much more familiar story to historians of political thought, but there must
be some question as to whether it is really as important historically as the
tradition of urban democratic republicanism, which obviously stood much
closer to the more robustly egalitarian, anti-ecclesiastical, and anti-
monarchical republican tendencies based on the ‘general will’ developed in
mid-eighteenth century France by Diderot, Mably, Boulanger, La Beaumelle
and Rousseau.
Impact and legacy
Spinoza never expected to have any impact on the common people and
frankly explains, in a letter to Henry Oldenburg at the time he began work on
this text in
1665, that he sought only to address the most independent-
minded and literate section of society.
36
But he believed that if he could
persuade some of these this could be enough, under certain circumstances,
to steer everything in the right direction; and to an extent he succeeded, for
the Theological-Political Treatise was very widely distributed, discussed, and
reacted to, both immediately after its publication in
1669^70 and over
subsequent decades. Even though it appeared without Spinoza’s name on its
title-page and with the place of publication falsely given as ‘Hamburg’ (it was
actually published in Amsterdam), it became a book in demand in certain
quarters, although it was never freely sold in the Netherlands and was
formally banned by the States of Holland, and the States General, in
1674 ^
along with Meyer’s Philosophia S. Scripturae Interpres (
1666) and Hobbes’
Leviathan ^ chie£y owing to its denial of miracles, prophecy and the divine
character of Scripture. Subsequently, it was prohibited also by many other
governmental and ecclesiastical authorities, including the French crown and
the Papacy; and most of the intellectual reaction, predictably, was also
intensely hostile. Nevertheless, despite the huge outcry and its being a
clandestine book, not a few Christian and deist scholars later admitted to
being in£uenced in signi¢cant ways by Spinoza’s conception of Bible
criticism and a few fringe Protestants with Socinian tendencies openly
embraced his doctrine, while secular-minded libertine, republican and
irreligious dissidents, the evidence suggests, were in some cases more than
a little enthusiastic.
36
Spinoza, The Letters,
185^6; Steven B. Smith, Spinoza’s Book of Life. Freedom and Redemption in the
Ethics (New Haven, CT,
2003), pp. 5^6.
xxxi
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə