Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə100/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   ...   114

evidently shows that religion has always been adapted to the interest of
the state.
[
13] If anyone asks what right the disciples of Christ had to preach
religion, since they were indubitably private men, I answer that they
preached by right of the power which they had received from Christ to
drive out impure spirits (see Matthew
10.1). At the end of chapter
16
above, I insisted that all men are obliged to keep faith even with a tyrant,
unless God has promised a person special help against a tyrant by a
separate revelation. Consequently, nobody may use [the example of the
disciples] as a precedent, unless he too possesses the power to work
miracles. This is likewise evident from the fact that Christ also admon-
ished his disciples not to
234
fear those who kill the body (see Matthew
10.28). If this were addressed to everyone, governments would be estab-
lished to no purpose, and Solomon’s instruction (Proverbs
24.21), ‘My
son, fear God and the king’, would be quite impious, which it assuredly
is not. We must therefore necessarily admit that the authority that Christ
conferred upon his disciples was dispensed uniquely, to them alone, and
cannot serve as a precedent for others.
[
14] I will not waste time on the arguments of my opponents where
they strive to separate sacred law from civil law and to maintain that only
the latter belongs to the sovereign authorities while the former adheres
to the universal church. Their arguments are so £imsy that these do not
deserve to be refuted. However, there is one thing here which I must
mention and show that they are miserably mistaken in maintaining their
seditious view (I beg pardon for the rather harsh expression), by taking
as an example the Hebrew high priest who at one time had the right to
handle sacred a¡airs. For the high priests received this right from Moses
who, as we showed above, alone retained the sovereign power, and,
equally, they could also be deprived of it by his decree. For he himself
chose not only Aaron but also his son Eleazar and his grandson Phine-
has, and conferred on them authority to administer the priesthood.
Thereafter, the high priests retained this authority exclusively as evident
substitutes for Moses, that is, for the sovereign power. As we have
already shown, Moses chose no successor to his government, but rather
distributed its duties in such a way that those who came after him were
seen to be substitutes for him, administering the state as if the king were
Theological-Political Treatise
244


absent rather than dead. Then, in the second commonwealth the priests
held this authority absolutely, having acquired control of the government
as well as the priesthood. Therefore, the right of the priesthood always
rested upon the edict of the sovereign power, and the priests never held
it except in conjunction with [their own] control of the government.
Earlier, authority over sacred matters was in fact absolutely in the hands
of the kings (as will be clear from what we shall say presently at the end
of this chapter) with only one exception: they were not allowed to turn
their hand to performing the sacred rites in the temple, because every-
one who was not in the genealogy of Aaron was held to be profane. This
sole exception clearly has no place in any Christian state.
[
15] We cannot doubt, therefore, that in our day sacred matters remain
under the sole jurisdiction of sovereigns. (The prime requisite for admin-
istering sacred matters is not a person’s family line but rather outstanding
moral qualities; accordingly, one cannot exclude those who hold power on
the ground that they are secular persons.)
235
No one has the right and power
without their authority or consent, to administer sacred matters or choose
ministers, or decide and establish the foundations and doctrines of a
church, nor may they [without that consent] give judgments about mor-
ality and observance of piety, or excommunicate or receive anyone into the
church, or care for the poor.
[
16] All this has been demonstrated not only to be true, as we have just
shown, but also absolutely essential both to religion itself and to con-
servation of the state. Everyone knows how much in£uence right and
authority in sacred matters have with the common people and how much
everyone listens to someone who possesses such authority. I may say that
whoever has this power has the greatest control over the people’s minds.
Therefore, any body which attempts to remove this authority from the
sovereign power, is attempting to divide the government. Con£ict and
discord, like that which occurred between the kings and priests of the
Hebrews in the past, will inevitably ensue and will never be resolved.
Indeed, as I said before, anyone who strives to appropriate this authority
from the sovereign powers is, in e¡ect, preparing a road to power for
himself. For what decisions can sovereigns make if they do not possess this
authority? They can assuredly make no decision whatever about war or
peace or anything else, if they are obliged to wait upon the opinion of
Sovereign powers and religion
245


another p e rs on to tell the m whe the r the p olicy they judge to b e in the
inte rests of the st ate is p ious or i mp ious. On the c on trar y, eve r ything will
de p e nd upon the dec is ion of the on e who p o s s e s s e s the r igh t to judge
and de cre e what is p ious and what is i mp ious , what is holy and what is
s acr ile g ious.
[
17] Eve r y age ha s witn e s s e d example s of this kind of dis s e ns ion. I will
adduce just on e which is , howeve r, typ ic al of the m all. Be c aus e this r igh t
wa s c once de d to the Pop e of Ro me without re str ict ion, he g radually
b e gan to b r ing all the king s u nde r his c on trol u n t il ¢nally he a s ce nde d to
the ve r y p innacle of supre me p owe r. He nceforward, any r ule r who
s ough t to le s s e n his author ity eve n a little , and e sp e c ially the Ge r man
e mp e rors , e n t irely faile d to achieve this ; in fact , on the c on trar y, by
atte mpt ing it , they e nor m ously fu r the r e nhance d his author ity. Howeve r,
what no m onarch c ould achi eve by ¢re and the sword, e ccle s ia st ic s
proved able to accomplish by the sole power of the pen. From this
instance alone one readily appreciates the strength and power of this
right and how vital it is for sovereigns to retain this authority for them-
selves alone.
[
18] If we als o prop e rly re£e ct on s o me remarks we made in the 
la st
chapte r
,

we shall s e e that all
236
this actually contributes substantially to the
enhancement of [true] religion and piety. We observed above that while
the prophets themselves were endowed with divine virtue, they were still
private individuals, and that therefore the warnings, rebukes and
denunciations which they took the liberty to deliver to men merely
antagonized them and failed to set them on the right path. However,
when men were warned or punished by kings, they were easily dis-
ciplined. Kings themselves, we also saw, very often turned away from
religion for the very reason that this right did not adhere to them abso-
lutely, and then the entire population followed them. Plainly, this [kind
of thing] has also happened very frequently in Christian states.
[
19] Here perhaps someone will inquire: who shall have the right to
champion piety, if those who hold power choose to be impious? Or are they
to be still regarded, even then, as interpreters of piety? I reply to this
7
See p.
232.
Theological-Political Treatise
246




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə