Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə101/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   ...   114

objection with a question: what if ecclesiastics (who are also men and
private individuals whose duty is to look after their own business alone)
or others to whom someone may wish to entrust authority in sacred
matters, choose to be impious? Are they then still to be regarded as
interpreters of piety?
It is indeed certain that if those who exercise power aspire to go their
own way, whether they possess authority in sacred matters or not,
everything, both sacred and secular, will rapidly deteriorate, and all the
faster if private men make a seditious attempt themselves to champion
divine right. Therefore, absolutely nothing is achieved by denying this
right to sovereigns. On the contrary, the situation is rendered very much
worse. For this very circumstance necessarily renders them impious (just
like the Hebrew kings to whom this right was not granted without
restrictions), and the consequent damage to the whole state is no longer
merely possible or probable but certain and inevitable. Whether we
consider the truth of the matter, or the security of the state, therefore, or
the enhancement of piety, we are obliged to conclude that the divine law,
or the law about sacred matters, depends entirely on the decree of the
sovereign authorities and that these are its interpreters and defenders. It
also follows from this that the ministers of the word of God are those
who teach the people piety by the authority of the sovereign powers and
adapt it by their rulings to the public interest.
[
20] It remains now to explain why there has always been controversy
about this right in Christian states, whereas, so far as I know, the Hebrews
never had any doubts about it. It may seem rather extraordinary that there
has always been a problem about
237
something so obvious and essential or
that sovereigns have never held this authority undisputedly and without
great risk of subversion and harm to religion.Were we unable to provide a
clear explanation for this, I might easily be persuaded that everything
I have proposed in this chapter is merely theoretical or the kind of specula-
tion that can never be useful. However, if we re£ect on the earliest begin-
nings of the Christian religion, the reason for this situation leaps out at us.
It was not kings who ¢rst taught the Christian religion, but rather
private individuals, who were acting against the will of those who exer-
cised political power, whose subjects they were. For a long time they were
accustomed to meet in private assemblies or churches, to set up sacred
o⁄ces, and manage, regulate and decide everything without having any
Sovereign powers and religion
247


rationale of government. After the passage of many years, though, when
their religion was ¢rst introduced into the government, churchmen had
to instruct the emperors in the religion that they themselves had fash-
ioned. Hence, they were easily able to ensure that they themselves were
recognized as this religion’s professors and interpreters, as well as being
pastors of the church and vicars, so to speak, of God. Subsequently, to
prevent Christian kings from arrogating this authority for themselves,
ecclesiastics made the very e¡ective move of prohibiting the highest
ministers of the church and supreme interpreter of religion from marry-
ing. Besides this, they vastly increased the number of religious dogmas
and so utterly intertwined these with philosophy that its highest inter-
preter had to be both a consummate philosopher and theologian, and busy
himself with an immense number of useless speculations, something which
is only possible for private men and those with a great deal of free time.
[
21] Among the Hebrews the situation had been completely di¡erent.
Their church began at the same time as their state, and Moses, who held
absolute power, taught the people religion, organized the sacred minis-
tries and selected the ministers. Thus, it came about among them that it
was the royal authority, by contrast, that had most in£uence with the
people and that in the main kings exercised authority in sacred matters.
After Moses’ demise no one exercised government absolutely, but the
leader had the right to determine both sacred and other matters (as we
have already shown), and for their part the people were obliged to go to
the supreme judge rather than a priest to be instructed in religion and
piety (see Deuteronomy
17.9^11). Finally, although the [Israelite] kings
did not possess authority to the
238
same extent as Moses, almost the whole
organization of the sacred ministry and the selection of ministers
depended upon their decree.
It was actually David who designed the structure of the Temple (see
1 Chronicles 28.11^12, etc.). Afterwards, he assigned 24,000 Levites to
chant psalms,
6000 Levites from among whom the judges and o⁄cers
were to be chosen, and then
4000 more as porters and another 4000 to
play musical instruments (see
1 Chronicles, 23.4^5).
8
He also divided
8
1 Chronicles 23.4^5: ‘‘‘Twenty-four thousand of these,’’ David said, ‘‘shall have charge of the
work in the house of the Lord, six thousand shall be o⁄cers and judges, four thousand gate-
keepers, and four thousand shall o¡er praises to the Lord with the instruments which I have
made for praise.’’ ’
Theological-Political Treatise
248


these men into companies and chose leaders for them, so that each
company might perform its service at the proper time in a regular rota-
tion (see
1 Chronicles 23.5). Likewise, he divided the priests into so many
companies, but I do not want to review every single detail one after the
other, and I refer the reader to
2 Chronicles 8.13, which says ‘the worship
of God as Moses instituted it was practised in the Temple by the com-
mand of Solomon’ and, in verse
14, ‘that he himself’ [i.e. Solomon]
‘established the companies of the priests in their ministries and the
companies of the Levites . . . according to the command of David, the
man of God’. Finally in verse
15, the historian testi¢es ‘that they did not
turn aside from what the king had commanded the priests and Levites in
any matter, nor in the management of the treasuries’.
[
22] From all of this and from other histories of the kings, it most
evidently follows that the entire practice of religion and the sacred min-
istry ensued from the commands of kings. I said above that they did not
possess the right that Moses had, of choosing the high priest, of con-
sulting God directly or of condemning prophets who prophesied while
they were still alive. I mention this simply because the authority which
the prophets had gave them the right to choose a new king, and to par-
don parricide, but not to summon a king to court, if he dared violate the
law, or take legal proceedings against him.
9
That is why if there had been
no prophets who could safely grant pardon to parricide by a special
revelation, the kings would have had complete authority over all things,
both sacred and civil, without restriction. Consequently, sovereigns
today, who do not have prophets and are not obliged by law to accept
them (for they are not bound by the laws of the Hebrews), have and
always will retain this authority [over sacred matters] absolutely, even
though they are not celibate, provided they do not allow religious dog-
mas to proliferate or become confused with knowledge.
9
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
39.
Sovereign powers and religion
249




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   97   98   99   100   101   102   103   104   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə