Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə103/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   ...   114

time they submit their view to the sovereign power and in the meantime
do nothing contrary to what that law commands, they surely deserve well
of their country, as every good citizen does. If, on the other hand, they
make use of this freedom to accuse the magistrate of wrongdoing and
render him odious to the common people or make a seditious attempt to
abolish the law against the magistrate’s will, then they are nothing more
than agitators and rebels.
[
8] Here we can see how the individual may say and teach what he thinks
without infringing the right and authority of the sovereign power, that is,
without disturbing the stability of the state. The key is to leave decisions
about any kind of action to the sovereign powers and do nothing contrary
to their decision, even if this requires someone acting in a way contrary to
what he himself judges best and publicly expresses.This he can do without
prejudice to either justice or piety, and this is what he should do, if he
wants to show himself a just and good man.
As we have already shown, justice
242
depends solely upon the sovereigns’
decree, and thus only someone who lives according to their o⁄cial decrees
can be just. The highest form of piety too (as we showed in the
previous
chapter
) is that which is practised with respect to the peace and tranquillity
of the state, and that stability could not be maintained if everyone lived
according to his own judgment. Consequently, it is also impious to
undertake anything on the basis of one’s own judgment contrary to the
decree of the sovereign whose subject one is since, were everyone allowed
to do so, the ruin of the state would inevitably follow. Furthermore, so long
as one behaves according to the decrees of the sovereign authorities, one
cannot act contrary to the decree and dictate of one’s own reason. For it was
the individual’s own reason that made him decide wholly to transfer his
right to live according to his own judgment to the sovereign. We can also
con¢rm this in practice. For in any kind of council, whether it is sovereign
or subordinate, it is rare for an action to be taken by a unanimous vote of all
members; nevertheless, resolutions to act are taken by the common deci-
sion of all the councillors, as much by those who voted against as by those
who voted in favour.
[
9] But I return to my topic.We have seen from the principles of the state
how everyone may enjoy liberty of judgment without prejudice to the right
of the sovereign power. On the basis of the same principles, we can also
A free state
253


readily determine which opinions are subversive in a given state. It is those
views which, simply by being put forward, dissolve the agreement by which
each person surrenders their right to act according to their own judgment.
For example, it is seditious for anyone to hold that a sovereign power does
not have an autonomous right or that one should not keep a promise or
that everyone should live according to their own judgment, and other
views of this kind which are directly contrary to the aforesaid agreement. It
is subversive not so much because of the judgments and opinions in
themselves as because of the actions which such views imply. By the very
fact that someone thinks such a thing, they are tacitly or explicitly breaking
the pact that they made with the sovereign. Accordingly, all other opinions
which do not imply such an act as breaking an agreement or vengeance or
anger, etc., are not subversive ^ except perhaps in a state which is corrupt
in some way, where superstitious and ambitious people who cannot toler-
ate free-minded persons, have achieved such reputation and prominence
that their authority exerts greater in£uence with the common people than
that of the sovereign powers.
243
However, we would not wish to deny that
there are some views which can be published and propagated with mal-
icious intention though in themselves they appear to be purely concerned
with truth and falsehood. But we have already determined what these are
in chapter
15
and in a way that ensured that reason would nevertheless
remain free.
If ¢nally we remember that everyone’s loyalty to the state, like their faith
in God, can only be known from their works, that is, from their charity
towards their neighbour, it will not be doubted that the best state accords
everyone the same liberty to philosophize as we showed that faith likewise
allows.
[
10] Undeniably, there are sometimes some disadvantages in such free-
dom. But what was ever so cleverly designed that it entailed no dis-
advantages at all? Trying to control everything by laws will encourage vices
rather than correcting them. Things which cannot be prevented must
necessarily be allowed, even though they are often harmful. How many
evils arise from extravagance, from envy, greed, drunkenness, and so on!
These are nevertheless tolerated because they cannot be prevented by
authority of the law, even though they really are vices. How much more
should liberty of judgment be conceded, which is without question a virtue
and cannot be suppressed. Further, the disadvantages which do arise from
Theological-Political Treatise
254


it can all be avoided by the authority of the magistrates (as I shall show
directly). I should also add further that this liberty is absolutely essential to
the advancement of the arts and sciences; for they can be cultivated with
success only by those with a free and unfettered judgment.
[
11] But let us suppose that such liberty can be suppressed and that
people can be so controlled that they dare not say anything but what the
sovereign power requires them to say. Now it will certainly never happen
that they think only what the authorities want, and thus it would necessa-
rily follow that men would be continually thinking one thing and saying
something else.This would undermine the trust which is the ¢rst essential
of a state; detestable £attery and deceit would £ourish, giving rise to
intrigues and destroying every kind of honest behaviour. For in reality it is
far from possible to make everyone speak according to a script. On the
contrary, the more one strives to deprive people of freedom of speech, the
more obstinately they resist. I do not mean greedy, fawning people who
have no moral character ^ their greatest
244
comfort is to think about the
money they have in the bank and ¢ll their fat stomachs ^ but those whom a
good upbringing, moral integrity and virtue have rendered freer.
There are many men who are so constituted that there is nothing they
would more reluctantly put up with than that the opinions they believe to
be true should be outlawed and that they themselves should be deemed
criminals for believing what moves them to piety towards God and men.
They therefore proceed to reject the laws and act against the magistrate.
They regard it as very honourable and not at all shameful to behave in a
seditious manner, on this account, or indeed attempt any kind of misdeed.
It is a fact that human nature is like this, and therefore it follows that laws
to curb freedom of opinion do not a¡ect scoundrels but rather impinge on
free-minded persons. They are not made to restrain the ill-intentioned so
much as persecute well-meaning men, and cannot be enforced without
incurring great danger to the state.
[
12] Furthermore, such laws are completely useless. Those who believe
doctrines condemned by law to be true will be unable to obey while those
who reject them as false will celebrate edicts condemning them as their
own special privileges and glory in them so that the sovereign will be
powerless to abolish such edicts afterwards even should he wish to. To
these points should be added the second conclusion we derived from the
A free state
255




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   99   100   101   102   103   104   105   106   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə