Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə109/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114

A n notatio n 
27 (p. 160) ‘like the whole of C hr ist’s te aching’: ‘That is to s ay,
the te aching that Je sus C hr ist gave on the m ou n t ain which St. Matthew
re p or ts (ch. 

¡.) [Fre nch only].
[C hapte r 
15
 ]
Annotation 
28 (p. 18 7) ‘anything that Scripture teaches dogmatically’:
See [Lodewijk Meyer] Ph il os ophy, th e In te rp rete r o f Holy Sc r ip t u re [ Ph i l o s o p h i a
S. Sc r i p t u ra e In t e r p re s ], p. 
75 .
40
Annotation 
29 (p. 190) ‘Samuel’ s e e [Meye r] Philos ophy the Interpreter, p. 76.
A n notatio n 
30 (p. 194) ‘I must 
263
e mpha s i z e ve r y strongly he re’: s e e [Meye r]
Philos ophy th e Interp reter, p.
115.
A n notatio n 
31 (p. 194) ‘that s i mple o b e die nce is the path to s alvat ion’: In
othe r words ,
41 
it is not rea s on but rathe r revelat ion that c an te ach us that it
su⁄ce s for s alvat ion or happ in e s s to accept the divin e decre e s a s laws or
commandments and that there is no need to understand them as eternal
truths. This is clear from what we proved in chapter
4
.
[C hapte r 
16
 ]
Annotation
32 (p.198) ‘will promise without deception’: In the civil state
where the common law determines what is good and what is bad, deception
is rightly divided into good and bad. In the state of nature, however, where
everyone
42
is judge of his own [a¡airs] and has the supreme right to
prescribe laws for himself and interpret them and even to abolish them if
he judges it to be advantageous to himself, it is not possible to conceive
that anyone deliberately acts deceitfully.
Annotation
33 (p. 201) ‘for there each man can be free whenever he
wishes’: A person can be free in any civil state whatsoever. For a person is
40
Lodewijk Meyer’s important book, declaring [Cartesian] ‘philosophy’ to be the ‘true interpreter’of
Scripture, appeared in Latin at Amsterdam in
1666 and in its slightly longer Dutch version at
Amsterdam the following year. There are a number of places in the text of the Theological-Political
Treatise where Spinoza appears to be carrying on a silent dialogue with his friend and ally.
41
‘Which we do not know naturally’ [in French].
42
‘Of right’ [in French].
Annotations
271


certainly free to the extent that he is guided by reason. However, (contrary
to what Hobbes says) reason recommends peace without reservation, and
peace cannot be had unless the general laws of the state are maintained
inviolate. Hence, the more a person is led by reason, i.e. the freer he is, the
more resolutely he will uphold the laws and obey the commands of the
sovereign authority whose subject he is.
Annotation
34 (p. 205) ‘For no one
264
knows from nature’: when Paul says
that men are ‘without a way out’,
43
he is speaking in a human manner.
For in chapter
9
‘verse
18’ of the same Epistle, he expressly states that
God pities whom he will and hardens whom he will, and that men are
without excuse simply because they are in God’s power like clay in the
hands of a potter who from the same lump makes one vessel for beauty,
and another for menial use; it is not because they have been warned
beforehand. As for the divine natural law whose highest precept we have
said is to love God, I have called it a law in the sense in which philoso-
phers apply the word law to the common rules of nature according to
which all things
44
happen. For love of God is not obedience but a virtue
necessarily present in someone who rightly knows God. Obedience on
the other hand, concerns the will of someone who commands, not the
necessity and truth of a thing. Since we do not know the nature of God’s
will but do certainly know that whatever happens happens solely by
God’s power, we can never know except via revelation whether God
wishes men to observe a cult revering him like a worldly ruler. Further-
more, divine commandments seem to us like decrees or enactments only
so long as we are ignorant of their cause. Once we know this, they
immediately cease to be edicts and we accept them as eternal truths, not
as decrees, that is, obedience immediately turns into love which arises
from true knowledge as inevitably as light emanates from the sun. By the
guidance of reason therefore we can love God but not obey him, since we
cannot accept divine laws as divine so long as we do not know their
cause, nor by reason can we conceive of God as issuing decrees like a
prince.
43
The reference seems to be to Epistle to the Romans
1.20.
44
‘Necessarily’ [in French].
Annotations
272


[C hapte r 
17
 ]
A n notatio n 
35 (p. 209) ‘that they c ould u nde r t ake nothing in the futu re’:
‘Two c o m m on s oldi e rs u nde r to ok to transfe r the gove r n me n t of the
Ro man p e ople , and they did s o’ (Tac itus , Histories , 
1). 
45
A n notatio n 
36 (p. 215) ‘see Numbers  
265
11 .28’: In this pa s s age
46 
tw o m e n 
47
are accus e d of having prophe s i e d in the c amp,
48 
and Jo shua advis e s that
they should i m me diately b e ar reste d. He would not have don e this ,
49 
had
it b e e n p e r mis s ible for anyon e to g ive divin e re sp ons e s to the p e ople
without Mo s e s’ p e r mis s ion. Eve n s o, Mo s e s dec ide d to acquit the m, and
rebuke d Jo shua for his u rg ing hi m to s e ek royal p owe r for hi ms elf at a
t i me whe n he wa s s o ve r y t ire d of r uling that he would prefe r to die
rathe r than gove r n alone , a s is evide n t from ve rs e 
14
50 
of the s ame
chapte r. This is his reply to Jo shua:
51 
‘Are you ang r y on my acc ou n t ?
Would that the whole p e ople of Go d we re prophe ts.’ That is ,
52 
wo u l d
that the r igh t of c onsulting Go d would succe e d in plac ing the gove r n -
me n t in the hands of the p e ople the ms elve s.
53 
Jo shua the refore wa s not
ig noran t of the law
54 
but of the requireme n ts of the t i me and this is why
he wa s repro ache d by Mo s e s , just a s Abishai wa s by David whe n he
advis e d the king to c ondemn Shi me i to de ath, who wa s ce r t ainly guilty of
trea s on ; s e e 
2 Samuel 19.22^3 .
Annotation
37 (p.215) ‘ On this see Numbers 27.21’:The translators (that
I happen to have seen) make a bad job of verses
19 and 23 of this chapter.
These verses do not signify that he gave Joshua orders or instructions, but
rather that he made or appointed him leader, as often in Scripture, e.g.,
Exodus
18.23, 1 Samuel 13.14, Joshua 1.9, and 1 Samuel 25.30, etc.
55
45
Tacitus, Histories,
1.25.2.
46
‘In Numbers’ [in French].
47
‘W h o s e n am e s a re g iven ch. 
11
 ver s e 28 of t h i s b o o k’ [ in Fre nc h] .
48
‘The news of it came immediately to Moses’ [in French].
49
‘And one would not have hesitated to report it to Moses as a criminal action’ [in French].
50
‘And
15’ [in French].
51
Numbers
11.29.
52
‘You would wish that there was only me to rule; as for myself, I would wish that the right of
consulting God would return to each individual and they would all rule together, and let me go’.
[in French].
53
‘And they would let me go’ [in French].
54
‘And the authority’ [in French].
55
‘The harder translators try to render verses
19 and 23 of this chapter literally’, adds the (very com-
petent) original French translator of Spinoza’s text, either Gabriel de Saint-Glain (c.
1620^84) or
Jean-Maximilian Lucas (
1646^97) ‘the less intelligible they make it, and I am convinced very few
people understand the true sense of it. Most imagine that God commands Moses in verse
19 to
instruct Joshua in the presence of the Assembly, and in verse
23 that he laid his hands upon him
Annotations
273




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   106   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə