Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə11/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   114

The ¢rst of many published refutations appeared in May
1670 in Leipzig,
under the title Adversus anonymum, de liberate philosophandi, written by
Leibniz’s teacher Jakob Thomasius (
1622^84), an important ¢gure in the
history of text criticism in his own right and one of the founders of
Enlightenment study of ‘history of philosophy’. In England, the ¢rst
response came mainly in the wake of the
1674 octavo edition. By late 1674,
Boyle was among those who were reported to have adamantly condemned
the work. In June
1675, Bishop Stilling£eet alluded to the writer of the
Theoligical-Political Treatise as being ‘mightily in vogue among many’. At
Cambridge, Henry More read theTheological-Political Treatise in
1676 and his
close ally, Ralph Cudworth (
1617^88), darkly refers to Spinoza in his True
Intellectual System of the Universe (
1678) as ‘that lateTheological Politician who
[wrote] against miracles [
... ] contending that a miracle is nothing but a
name, which the ignorant vulgar gives to Opus Naturae insolitum, any
unwonted work of Nature, or to what themselves can assign no cause of; as
also that if there were any such thing done, contrary to nature or above it, it
would rather weaken than con¢rm, our belief of the divine existence’.
37
The post-
1678 penetration of the Theological-Political Treatise in France
was even faster and deeper.We know from his letters that Bayle, who read it
in its French version in
1679, was one among many who read the book in
France in the late
1670s. It is noteworthy that he was acutely aware that the
anonymous text (which he says in a letter he considered the most impious
work he had ever seen) was written by ‘the famous Spinoza’. Furthermore,
we know that he acquired his personal copy of Spinoza’s Ethics and his
exposition of Descartes’ philosophy, of
1663, in France, a mere few months
later, suggesting that he was already then intensely preoccupied, as he
remained until his death in
1706, with Spinoza’s philosophy as an entire
system. In subsequent decades, Spinoza’s thought continued to exert a
strong in£uence in France. Only very much later, in the nineteenth century,
was there a strong tendency towards marginalizing both Spinoza and Bayle
as key in£uences on modern thought.
The prevailing lack of interest in the origins of modern democratic
republicanism today is thus by no means the only reason for Spinoza’s
distinctly odd posthumous career since his death in
1677. For in both the
history of philosophy and the wider historiography of modern thought not
37
Ralph Cudworth, The True Intellectual System of the Universe (
1678; 2 vols. repr. New York, 1978),
ii,
707.
xxxii
Introduction


only Spinoza’s democratic republicanism, but the importance of his
toleration theory and impact of his system as a whole, have continually been
played down, indeed masked by the persistence of a number of (after
1850)
curiously durable and interlocking presumptions about the relationship of
Spinoza to modern thought and ‘modernity’ as such. First, there is what
might be called a deeply rooted tradition, still very much alive today, of
idealizing Renaissance humanism and text scholarship and representing it
as much more ‘modern’and closer to the spirit of the Enlightenment than it
actually was. This had the e¡ect of obscuring the importance of the
revolution in text criticism at the end of the seventeenth century, something
to which Richard Simon, Jean le Clerc, Fontenelle, and Pierre Bayle, no less
than Spinoza, all made major contributions. Secondly, there is the long-
standing tendency to underestimate the general signi¢cance of pre-
1720
Dutch democratic republican, anti-clerical and scienti¢c thought in
shaping the early stages of the Western Enlightenment as a whole,
something which has served to mask the importance of Spinoza’s immediate
local intellectual background in shaping the characteristic values of
‘modernity’.
Thirdly, and perhaps hardest of all to explain, there has been, almost
everywhere since the mid-nineteenth century, a pervasive misconception
that Spinoza was a thinker whom practically no one read, understood or was
in£uenced by. This post-
1850 view of him as a thoroughly isolated thinker,
exemplary and lofty no doubt but very little read and exerting no in£uence,
came completely to obscure the reality that he was actually a socially and
politically highly engaged thinker. This remains today an entrenched and
widely accepted view despite its being wholly unhistorical and at odds with
how Spinoza was actually received in the late seventeenth and eighteenth
centuries. For during the Enlightenment every important thinker and
commentator centrally engaged with Spinoza, even if only silently, as in the
case of Locke (who had several copies of his works, including theTheological-
Political Treatise in his personal library). Bayle, indeed, became nothing less
than obsessed with Spinoza and was far more preoccupied with him
than with either Hobbes, Locke, or Newton. Likewise, it was entirely
representative and typical of the Enlightenment that Condillac in his Traite
´
des syste
` mes (1749) should have devoted more space to Spinoza than to any
other thinker.
As a historical phenomenon, the almost universal tendency since the
nineteenth century to marginalize, if not Spinoza the lofty philosopher, then
xxxiii
Introduction


certainly the historical, politically engaged Spinoza (and by the Dutch to
write him out of Dutch history) may perhaps best be explained by the
expansion of reading and education and the view that children, students and
the general public should be shielded as far as possible from such ‘atheistic’,
anti-Scriptural, democratic and libertarian concepts, ideas which down to
the
1940s continued to be generally regarded in the world as deeply
subversive, licentious and shocking. How far Spinoza’s thought is su⁄ciently
relevant today to merit widespread revival and study in universities is
something about which I leave readers, in the true tradition of his subversive
critical-historical-empirical philosophy, to make up their own minds.
Introduction
xxxiv




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə