Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə15/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   114

But what chie£y distinguishes his style is his reliance on a relatively
restricted vocabulary, unsophisticated and straightforward syntax, tight
argumentation and a relentless reiteration of key terms.The general e¡ect, is
of a spare, lucid and incisive argument with little rhetorical embellishment,
although the ‘prefaces’ which open some chapters (eg. ch.
7
) and introduce
the book itself, and occasional other passages, reveal a Spinoza who
commands a di¡erent register which he mostly chose not to use. While he
makes no display of his classical reading, Spinoza does sometimes weave
well-known phrases from Latin writers into his own text generally without
acknowledging their derivation. These phrases, not infrequently, are from
Terence ^ a favourite teaching tool of his Latin master,Van den Enden ^ but
he also draws on Horace, Tacitus and a few others. Rather remarkably he
allowsTacitus (again without acknowledging the fact) to provide a key phrase
of the book which ¢gures in the title of chapter
20
: ‘et sentire quae velit
et quae sentiat dicere licet’’ (cf. Tacitus, Histories
1.1) [(that everyone) be
allowed to think what they wish and to say what they think].
The most striking feature of Spinoza’s Latinity, though, and the most
problematic for any translator, is certainly his distinctive terminology and in
particular his subtle and sometimes not so subtle altering of the usual
meaning of words to ¢t the requirements of his philosophical system. In the
introduction, mention is made of how he rede¢nes the meaning of
‘prophecy’,‘religious’,‘superstition’, and ‘piety’ to make these words signify
something quite distinct from what was then, or previously, generally meant
by them. But there are also many other examples of this procedure, some of
which involve frequent repetition of terms which would be highly
misleading if translated in the usual manner and which therefore raise all
sorts of complications for the translator. As has previously been remarked, it
is invariably di⁄cult or impossible adequately to translate Spinoza’s term
philosophia as ‘philosophy’ as it is usually understood, because Spinoza
means by it the whole of science together with all other soundly based
knowledge.
5
This rules out, for instance, our always rendering the term
libertas philosophandi, which occurs in the subtitle and which is the main
objective fought for in the concluding chapter, as ‘liberty to philosophize’,
since the phrase as used by Spinoza clearly signi¢es freedom of (particularly
intellectual) thought in general.
5
Wim Klever, De¢nitie van het Christendom. SpinozasTractatusTheologico-Politicus op nieuw vertaald
en toegelicht (Delft,
1999), p. 9.
xliv
Note on the text and translation


Another notable example of the di⁄culty of translating Spinoza’s Latin
adequately is the idea of ‘divine law’ which he discusses at some length in the
fourth chapter
of the TTP, a place where again he is being openly
philosophical rather than philological. For Spinoza,‘divine law’ is not, and
has never been, something possessing supernatural status and is therefore
not delivered to men by means of Revelation. Nor are there any religious
leaders who have special access to it. Lex divina, as one scholar has aptly put
it recently, ‘is simply Spinoza’s term for the power of nature as a whole’.
Spinoza’s ‘divine law’ expects no ceremonies; its reward is simply that of
knowing the ‘law’ itself, and its highest precept ‘is to love God as the
supreme good’, that is,‘not from fear of punishment or penalty, nor from the
love of some other thing by which we desire to be pleased’, but from a mature
awareness that ‘knowledge and love of God is the ultimate end to which all
our actions are to be directed’.
Furthermore, Spinoza frequently employs his rede¢ned terms in close
interaction with each other, in this way developing a closely textured, new
and highly idiosyncratic form of philosophical discourse in which, for
instance, the only genuine measure of who is ‘religious’and who is not is that
of how far any individual practises ‘piety’, which turns out to be always
outside the bounds of ‘theology’ and to consist solely of charity and justice.
His chief aim in the Theological-Political Treatise, using terms as he does, is
thus to bring ‘religion’ as much as possible into politics and society while
simultaneously shutting ‘theology’ and dogma as much as possible out.
Since his ‘divine law’ is the basis of the ‘universal law’,‘common to all men’,
something which Spinoza claims to have deduced from ‘universal human
nature’ and which most men are incapable of understanding, it requires, by
its very nature, other structures of authority and direction, surrogate kinds
of law, with which to shape the lives of the common people. Such a lower, or
less philosophical, code of law, like the Law of Moses, is therefore not just
remote from but in some sense actually opposed to ‘divine law’ in Spinoza’s
parlance, despite the fact that it is the latter which is called ‘divine law’ by
nearly all other writers. Spinoza is perfectly aware of how subversive his use
of words is but at the same time he strives to be clear: hence, what is
commonly called ‘divine law’, he insists, di¡ers from what is truly ‘divine law’
in not being ‘universal’ and being ‘adapted solely to the temperament and
preservation of one people’, as well as built around ceremonies and
observances which subsequently became super£uous. One consequence of
such idiosyncratic use of terminology is that Spinoza’s ‘divine law’ is highly
xlv
Note on the text and translation




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə