Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə16/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   114

unlikely ever to converge with the pronouncements of the biblical prophets:
‘it must be said of all the prophets who gave laws in the name of God’, he
remarks loftily,‘that they did not perceive the decrees of God adequately as
eternal truths.’
Finally, Spinoza supplied all the original Old and New Testament
quotations in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek, as well as some citations from
Maimonides and Ibn Ezra in Hebrew, providing his own translations into
Latin. We have not reproduced his original Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek
quotations here. While Spinoza’s Hebrew texts are not always identical in
every word, or in punctuation, with the text in the Hebrew Bible and while
we are very conscious that even where his wording is identical his
interpretation of these passages often radically diverges from those adopted
in the Vulgate and in the ecclesiastically approved Protestant Latin and
vernacular translations of Scripture, it seemed clear that in translating
Spinoza’s text what really matters is to convey accurately the way he renders
these biblical and other citations into Latin. Hence, following the procedure
adopted by nearly all the vernacular translations, early modern and modern,
we have simply translated Spinoza’s Latin rendering of the Hebrew originals
as these are (almost identically) reproduced in the Gebhardt and Akkerman
editions.
Note on the text and translation
xlvi


Spinoza
Theological-Political Treatise
Containing
several discourses
which demonstrate that
freedom to philosophize may not only be
allowed without danger to piety and the stability of the
republic but cannot be refused without destroying the
peace of the republic and piety itself
The First Epistle of John, chapter
4
, verse
13:
‘By this we know that we remain in God, and God remains in us,
because he has given us of his spirit.’
hamburg
Published by Heinrich Kuhnraht
1670
1
1
The Tractatus was actually published, we know, in Amsterdam and not in Hamburg. The false
place of publication, ‘Hamburg’, was doubtless inserted by Spinoza’s publisher Jan Rieuwertsz
(c.
1616^87) as a precaution, as the work was illegally and clandestinely published in violation of
the Dutch Republic’s censorship laws and without the name of any author or (true) name of the
publisher. The choice of the false publisher’s name, Heinrich Kuhnraht, was probably intended
by Rieuwertsz as an arcane joke, this being the name of a well-known early seventeenth-century
German mystical writer, Heinrich Kuhnraht (
1560^1605).



Preface
5
[
1] If men were always able to regulate their a¡airs with sure judgment,
or if fortune always smiled upon them, they would not get caught up in any
superstition. But since people are often reduced to such desperate straits
that they cannot arrive at any solid judgment and as the good things of
fortune for which they have a boundless desire are quite uncertain, they
£uctuate wretchedly between hope and fear. This is why most people are
quite ready to believe anything. When the mind is in a state of doubt, the
slightest impulse can easily steer it in any direction, and all the more
readily when it is hovering between hope and fear, though it may be con-
¢dent, pompous and proud enough at other times.
[
2] I think that everyone is aware of this, even though I also believe that
most people have no self-knowledge. For no one can have lived long among
men without noticing that when things are going well, most people, how-
ever ignorant they may be, are full of their own cleverness and are insulted
to be o¡ered advice. But when things go wrong, they do not know where to
turn and they will seek guidance from anyone. No suggestion they hear is
too unwise, ridiculous or absurd to follow. Moreover, for the £imsiest of
reasons they are conditioned one moment to expect everything to go better
and the next to fear the worst. For when they are afraid, anything they see
that reminds them of some good or bad thing in the past seems to prog-
nosticate a happy or unhappy outcome, and so they call it a good or a bad
omen, even though they have been disappointed a hundred times in the
past. Again, if they see anything out of the ordinary that causes them great
astonishment, they believe it to be a prodigy which indicates the anger of
the gods or of the supreme deity, and they think it would be sinful not to
3


expiate it by o¡ering sacri¢ce and prayers, because they are addicted to
superstition and adverse to [true] religion. They develop an in¢nite num-
ber of such practices, and invent extraordinary interpretations of nature, as
if the whole of nature were as senseless as they are.
[
3] This being the case, we see at once that it is especially those who have
a boundless desire for things that are uncertain who are the most prone to
superstition of every kind and especially that all humans when they ¢nd
themselves in danger and are unable to support themselves implore
divine assistance with pleas and womanish tears.They swear that reason is
blind and human wisdom fruitless because it cannot show them a sure
way of acquiring the empty things they want. On the other hand, they
believe that the delirious wanderings of the imagination, dreams and
all sorts of childish nonsense are divine replies, that God is adverse to
the wise and that rather than inscribe his laws in the mind, he writes
them in the intestines of animals, and that fools, madmen and birds reveal
them by divine inspiration and impulse. It is dread that makes men so
irrational.
[
4] Hence, fear is the root from
6
which superstition is born, maintained
and nourished. If anyone wants to go further into this matter and consider
particular examples, let him contemplate Alexander the Great. Although
superstitious by nature, he did not begin to consult prophets until he ¢rst
learned to fear fortune at the Gates of Susa (see Curtius,
5.4).
2
However,
after he succeeded in defeating Darius, he ceased using soothsayers and
seers, until he was once again caught up in a frighteningly di⁄cult situa-
tion with the Bactrians in revolt and the Scythians provoking con£ict while
he himself was laid up with a wound. As Curtius himself says at
7.7:
‘turning again to superstition, that mockery of human minds, he com-
manded Aristander, to whom he entrusted his credulous fear, to make
sacri¢ces to predict how things would turn out’. Many similar examples
could be given which show with complete clarity that people are swayed by
credulity only so long as they are afraid; that all the things they have ever
worshipped under the in£uence of false religion are nothing but the fan-
cies and fantasies of despondent and fearful minds; and that prophets have
2
Quintus Curtius, History of Alexander,
5.4.
Theological-Political Treatise
4




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə