Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə19/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   114

and s e ttle the whole is sue , I de m onstrate how Scr iptu re should b e in te r-
pre te d, proving that we must de r ive all ou r knowle dge of it and of sp ir itual
matte rs fro m Scr iptu re alon e and not from what we dis c ove r by the natu ral
ligh t of re a s on.
15
Afte r this I pa s s on to show the prejudice s which have ar is e n b e c aus e the
c o mm on p e ople (who are addicte d to sup e rst it ion and che r ish the relic s of
t i me rathe r than e te r nity its elf ) adore the b o oks of Scr iptu re rathe r than
the word of Go d a s such. The n I prove that the reve ale d word of Go d is not
a ce r t ain numb e r of b o oks but a pure c once ption of the divin e mind which
wa s reve aled to the prophe ts , namely, to o b ey Go d with all on e’s mind by
pract is ing just ice and char ity. I show that this is t augh t in Scr iptu re
acc ording to the u nde rst anding and b eli efs of tho s e to who m the prophe ts
and the Ap o stle s nor mally pre ache d this word of Go d. This they did in
order that p e ople migh t e mb race it without any reluctance and with the ir
whole minds.
16
[
11] Having thus dem onstrate d the fu ndamen t als of faith, I c onclude
¢nally that the o bje ct of reve aled knowle dge is s i mply o b e die nce. It is
the refore e n t irely dist inct from natu ral knowle dge b oth in its o bje ct and in
its pr inc iple s and me tho ds , and ha s nothing whateve r in c o m m on with it.
Each of the m [ i.e. faith and natural knowle dge] ha s its ow n province ; they
do not c on£ict with e ach
11 
othe r; and n e ithe r should b e sub ordinate to the
other.
17
[
12] Fu r the r m ore , hu man b e ing s have ve r y di¡e re n t minds , and ¢nd
the ms elve s c o mfor t able with ve r y di¡e ren t b eli efs ; what m ove s on e p e rs on
to devot ion provoke s another to laugh te r. Taking this toge the r with what
I s aid ab ove , I c onclude that eve r yon e should b e allowe d the lib e r ty of
their own judgment and authority to interpret the fundamentals of faith
according to their own minds; and that the piety or impiety of each per-
son’s faith should be judged by their works alone. In this way everyone will
be able to obey God in a spirit of sincerity and freedom, and only justice
and charity will be esteemed by everyone.
18
[
13] Having in this way demonstrated the freedom the revealed divine
law accords to every person, I proceed to the second part of my thesis,
15
Chs.
 
7
 ^
11
 .
16
C hs. 
12
 an d 
13
.
17
Ch. 
14
.
18
Ch. 
15
.
Theological-Political Treatise
10


which is that this lib e r ty c an b e g ran te d without e ndange r ing the st ability
of the st ate or the r igh t of the s ove reig n author it i e s , and eve n that it must
b e g rante d, and c annot b e suppres s e d without g re at dange r to p e ace and
i m me ns e har m to the whole re public.
To de m o n s t ra te t h i s , I b e g i n wi t h t h e n a tu ral r igh t of t h e i n divi dual
p e rs o n. Th i s exte n ds a s fa r a s h i s de s i re a n d p owe r exte n d, a n d n o o n e i s
o blige d by the r igh t of natu re to live acc ordi ng to t he vi ews of anothe r
p e rs o n: ra t h e r e a c h i s t h e defe n de r of h i s ow n l ib e r ty. Fu r t h e r m o re ,
I e s t abl i s h t h a t n o o n e t r uly c e de s t h i s r igh t wi t h o ut t ra n s fe r r i ng to
s o me o n e e l s e h i s p owe r to defe n d h i m s e lf. Mo re ove r t h e m a n to wh o m
e a c h p e rs o n h a s t ra n s fe r re d t h e i r r igh t to l ive a c c o rdi ng to t h e i r ow n
vi ews to g e t h e r wi t h t h e i r p owe r of defe n di ng t h e m s e lve s , wo uld t h e n
n e c e s s a r i ly h old t h i s r igh t ab s olute ly. Th o s e wh o h old s ove re ig n aut h o r-
i ty, I s h ow, h ave t h e r igh t to do al l t h i ng s t h a t t h ey h ave t h e p owe r to
do, a n d a re t h e s ol e defe n de rs of r igh t a n d l ib e r ty, a n d eve r yon e e l s e
mu s t do eve r yt h i ng [ ove r wh i c h t h e s ove re ig n exe r t s aut h o r i ty] by t h e i r
de c re e al o n e.
But no on e c an depr ive hims elf of his p owe r of defe nding hi ms elf in
such a way that he cea s e s to b e a human b e ing. He nce , I c onclude that no
on e c an b e ab s olutely de pr ive d of the ir natural r igh t , but that subjects
re t ain ce r t ain thing s , by r igh t of natu re a s it we re , that c annot b e [ de cre e d
to b e] t ake n from the m without g rave dange r to the st ate. Eithe r the refore
the s e thing s are t aci tly g rante d or els e they are expre s sly c on tracte d with
those who hold sovereign authority.
19
[
14] After establishing these points, I move on to the commonwealth of
the Hebrews, describing it at some length to show by what means and by
whose decision religion acquired the force of law, and ‘in passing’ pointing
out also some other things that I thought deserved to be known.
20
Next
I prove that those who hold sovereign power are the defenders and inter-
preters of sacred as well as civil law, and that they alone have the authority
to decide what is just and what is unjust, what is pious and what is
impious.
21
Finally, I conclude that they
12
can best retain their authority and
fully conserve the state only by conceding that each individual is entitled
both to think what he wishes and to say what he thinks.
22
19
Ch. 
16
 .
20
C hs. 
17
 and 
18
.
21
Ch. 
19
.
22
Ch. 
20
. The ¢nal ph ra s e agai n re £ e ct s Tac itus , Hi s t o r i e s , 
1 .1 ; c f. n. 7 .
Preface
11




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə