Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə20/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   114

[
15] These are the topics, philosophical reader, that I here o¡er for your
examination. I trust they will not be unwelcome given the importance and
usefulness of the subject matter both of the work as a whole and of each
chapter. I could say more, but I do not want this Preface to swell into a
volume, especially as I believe the main points are well enough known to
philosophers [i.e. those capable of rational reasoning]. As for others, I am
not particularly eager to recommend this treatise to them, for I have no
reason to expect that it could please them in any way. I know how obsti-
nately those prejudices stick in the mind that the heart has embraced in
the form of piety. I know that it is as impossible to rid the common people
of superstition as it is to rid them of fear. I know that the constancy of the
common people is obstinacy, and that they are not governed by reason but
swayed by impulse in approving or ¢nding fault. I do not therefore invite
the common people and those who are a¥icted with the same feelings as
they are [i.e. who think theologically], to read these things. I would wish
them to ignore the book altogether rather than make a nuisance of them-
selves by interpreting it perversely, as they do with everything, and while
doing no good to themselves, harming others who would philosophize
more freely were they able to surmount the obstacle of believing that rea-
son should be subordinate to theology. I am con¢dent that for this latter
group of people this work will prove extremely useful.
[
16] For the rest, as many people will have neither the leisure nor the
energy to read it right through to the end, I must give notice here, as I do
again at the end of the treatise, that I maintain nothing that I would not
very willingly submit to the examination and judgment of the sovereign
authorities of my country. If they judge anything I say to be in con£ict with
the laws of my country or prejudicial to the common good, I wish it unsaid.
I know that I am human and may have erred.
23
I have however taken great
pains not to err, and to ensure above all that everything I write entirely
accords with the laws of my country, with piety, and with morality.
23
Compare Terence, Adelphi,
579.
Theological-Political Treatise
12


chapter 1
15
On prophecy
[
1] Prophecy or revelation is certain knowledge about something
revealed to men by God. A prophet is someone who interprets things
revealed by God to those who cannot themselves achieve certain knowl-
edge of them and can therefore only grasp by simple faith what has been
revealed. The Hebrew for ‘prophet’ is nabi,
1
which means ‘orator’ or
‘interpreter’, but is always used in Scripture to mean an interpreter of
God. We may infer this from Exodus
7.1, where God says to Moses,
‘Behold, I make you Pharaoh’s God, and your brother Aaron shall be your
prophet’. It is as if God were saying that, since Aaron acts as a prophet
by interpreting your words to Pharaoh, you will be like Pharaoh’s God,
i.e., someone who performs the role of God.
[
2] We will discuss prophets in the
next chapter
; here we will discuss
prophecy. From the de¢nition of prophecy just given, it follows that the
word ‘prophecy’ could be applied to natural knowledge. For what we know
by the natural light of reason depends on knowledge of God and his eternal
decrees alone. But the common people do not place a high value on natural
knowledge, because it is available to everyone, resting as it does on foun-
dations that are available to all. For they are always eager to discover
uncommon things, things that are strange and alien to their own nature,
and they despise their natural gifts. Hence when they speak of prophetic
knowledge, they mean to exclude natural knowledge.
And yet, natural knowledge has as much right to be called divine as any
other kind of knowledge, since it is the nature of God, so far as we share in
1
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
1.
13


it, and God’s decrees, that may be said to dictate it to us. It does not di¡er
from the knowledge which all men call divine, except that divine knowl-
edge extends beyond its limits, and the laws of human nature considered in
themselves cannot be the cause of it. But with respect to the certainty
which natural knowledge involves
16
and the source from which it derives
(namely God), it is in no way inferior to prophetic knowledge ^ unless
perhaps one is willing to accept the nonsensical suggestion that the pro-
phets did not have human minds though they had human bodies, and that
their sensations and consciousness therefore were of a quite di¡erent nat-
ure from ours!
[
3] But despite the fact that natural knowledge is divine, its practitioners
cannot be called prophets.
2
For other men may discern and embrace what
they teach with as much certainty and entitlement as they do themselves.
They do not just accept it on faith.
[
4] Since therefore our mind possesses the power to form such notions
from this alone ^ that it objectively contains within itself the nature of
God and participates in it ^ as explain the nature of things and teach us
how to live, we may rightly a⁄rm that it is the nature of the mind, in so far
as it is thus conceived, that is the primary source of divine revelation. For
everything that we understand clearly and distinctly is dictated to us (as we
have just pointed out) by the idea of God and by nature, not in words, but
in a much more excellent manner which agrees very well with the nature of
the mind, as every man who has experienced intellectual certainty has
undoubtedly felt within himself.
[
5] But as my principal purpose is to discuss things which concern
only Scripture, these few words about the natural light of reason will
su⁄ce. I now move on to the other causes and the other means by which
God reveals to men things that exceed the limits of natural knowledge
(as well as things that do not exceed those limits, since nothing prevents
God from communicating to men by other means knowledge which we
learn by the light of nature). I will discuss these other means at some
length.
2
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
2.
Theological-Political Treatise
14




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə