Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə21/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   ...   114

[
6] Truly, however, whatever we are able to say about them must be
derived from Scripture alone. For what can we say of things that exceed the
limits of our understanding apart from what comes to us from the very lips
of a prophet or his writings? Since we have no prophets in our day so far as
I know, our only recourse is to peruse the sacred scrolls the prophets have
left us. But we must take great care not to say anything about such matters,
or to attribute anything to the prophets, which they have not clearly stated
themselves. And here at the outset we must note that the Jews never specify
intermediate or particular causes and take no notice of them, but owing to
religion and piety, or (in the common
17
phrase) ‘for devotion’s sake’, refer
everything back to God. For example, if they have made some money by a
business transaction, they say that it has been given to them by God; if
they happen to want something, they say that God has stirred their heart;
and if they think of something, they say that God has said it to them.
Therefore we should not consider as prophecy or supernatural knowledge
everything that Scripture claims God says to someone but only what
Scripture expressly designates as prophecy or revelation or which, from
the circumstances of the narrative, clearly is such.
[
7] If therefore we peruse the sacred books, we shall see that everything
that God revealed to the prophets was revealed to them either in words or
in images, or by both these means together, i.e. in words and images. But
the words, and the images too, were either true and independent of the
imagination of the prophet who heard or saw them, or else imaginary, that
is the prophet’s imagination, even when he was awake, was so disposed that
it seemed to him that he was clearly hearing words or seeing something.
[
8] It was with a real voice that God revealed to Moses the Laws which he
wished to be given to the Hebrews, as is apparent from Exodus
25.22,
where he says,‘and I will be ready for you there, and I will speak with you
from that part of the covering of the ark, which is between the two cher-
ubim’. This plainly shows that God used a real voice, since Moses found
God ready to speak to him there whenever he wished. But it was only this
voice with which the Law was proclaimed that was a real voice, as I shall
show directly.
[
9] I might perhaps be inclined to think that the voice in which God
called Samuel was also a real one since at
1 Samuel 3.21 it is stated: ‘And
On prophecy
15


God appeared again to Samuel in Shiloh, because God was manifested to
Samuel in Shiloh by the word of God.’ This might mean that the appear-
ance of God to Samuel was nothing other than God manifesting himself to
Samuel by a word or Samuel hearing God speak. Yet because we are com-
pelled to distinguish between the prophecy of Moses and that of the other
prophets, we must conclude that the voice Samuel heard was imaginary.
This can also be inferred from its resemblance to the voice of Eli, which
Samuel was very used to hearing, and thus could even more easily be
imagined: when he was called by
18
God three times, he thought he was being
called by Eli.
[
10] The voice Abimelech heard was imaginary; for it is said at Genesis
20.6,‘and God said to him in sleep’, etc.Therefore it was not when he was
awake but only in his sleep (a time when the imagination is naturally most
inclined to imagine things which do not exist) that he was able to imagine
the will of God.
[
11] Some Jews are of the opinion that the words of the Ten Com-
mandments or Decalogue were not spoken by God. They think that the
Israelites merely heard an inarticulate noise without words, and whilst
this continued, they conceived the laws of the Decalogue in their own
minds alone. I too thought this at one time, because I saw that the words
of theTen Commandments in Exodus di¡er from those of theTen Com-
mandments in Deuteronomy. It seems to follow from this that the Dec-
alogue does not intend to give us God’s actual words but only the
meaning of what he said. However, unless we are willing to do violence to
Scripture, we must concede without reservation that the Israelites heard
a real voice. For Scripture expressly says (Deuteronomy
5.4),‘God spoke
to you face to face’, etc., that is, in the manner in which two men normally
communicate their thoughts to each other by means of their two bodies.
It seems therefore more in accord with Scripture to acknowledge that
God really created a voice by which he revealed theTen Commandments.
(For the reason why the words and justi¢cations of the one passage di¡er
from the words and justi¢cations of the other, see chapter
8
.)
[
12] Admittedly, though, this does not altogether remove the di⁄culty.
For it seems quite contrary to reason to assert that a created thing
depending upon God in the same way as other created things, could
Theological-Political Treatise
16


express or explain in its own person the essence or existence of God in
fact or words, that is, by declaring in the ¢rst person,‘I am Jehovah your
God’, etc. It is true that when someone uses his mouth to say, ‘I have
understood’, no one supposes it was the speaker’s mouth that understood;
we know rather it was his mind. But consider the reason for this: the
mouth is part of the nature of the man who spoke, and he to whom the
remark was uttered also knows what an intellect is and easily understands
what is the speaker’s mind by making a comparison with himself. How-
ever, in the case of a people who previously knew nothing of God but his
name, and desired to speak with him so as to be assured of his existence,
I do not see how their desire was met by means of a created thing
(which no more relates to God than do other created things, and does
not belong to God’s nature) proclaiming,
19
‘I am God.’ What if God had
manipulated Moses’ lips (but why Moses and not some animal?) to
pronounce the same words and say, ‘I am God’, would they have
understood the existence of God from that?
[
13] Also, Scripture unequivocally states that God himself spoke (and
descended from heaven to Mount Sinai for this purpose), and not only did
the Jews hear him speaking, but the elders also saw him (see Exodus,
ch.
24). Nor did the Law revealed to Moses, to which nothing could be
added or subtracted and which became the law of the land, ever prescribe
the belief that God is incorporeal or even that he has no image or shape,
but only that he is God and that they must believe in him and adore him
alone. The reason why it enjoined them not to assign any image to him or
to make any image was so that they would not cease worshipping him. For
given they had not seen an image of God, they could not have made one
which would represent him, but only one which would necessarily repre-
sent some other created thing that they had seen. Therefore when they
adored God through that image, they would not be thinking of God but of
the thing which that image re£ected, and thus in the end they would be
giving to that thing the honour and worship due to God. Moreover,
Scripture clearly a⁄rms that God does have a shape, and that when Moses
was listening to God talking, he actually caught a glimpse of him, but saw
nothing but God’s back.
3
For this reason I do not doubt that some mystery
lies hidden here, of which we shall speak at greater length below. Here I will
3
Exodus
33.17^23.
On prophecy
17




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə