Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə23/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   114

spirit’ hatred and melancholy,‘a good spirit’ kindness; we also ¢nd ‘a spirit of
jealousy’, ‘a spirit’ (or appetite) ‘of fornication’, and ‘a spirit of wisdom’ (or
‘counsel’ or ‘courage’), which signi¢es (for in Hebrew we employ nouns more
frequently than adjectives) a wise, prudent or brave mind, or the virtue of wis-
dom, counsel or courage; also,‘a spirit of benevolence’, etc.
(
6) It denotes the mind or soul itself,
23
as at Ecclesiastes
3.19,‘The spirit’ (or
soul) ‘is the same in all men’,‘and the spirit returns to God’.
(
7) Finally it can refer to the quarters of the world (because of the winds that
blow from them), and also the sides of any thing which look toward those
quarters: see Ezekiel
37.9, 42.16^19, etc.
[
23] We must also note that something is referred to God and is said to
be of God,
(
1) because it belongs to the nature of God and is, so to speak, a part of God,
as in the expressions,‘the power of God’ and ‘the eyes of God’.
(
2) because it is in the power of God and acts at his command; thus in the
Scriptures the heavens are called ‘the heavens of God’, because they are the char-
iot and the home of God; Assyria is called the scourge of God, and
Nebuchadnezzar the servant of God, etc.
(
3) because it is dedicated to God, as‘the temple of God’,‘a Nazarene of God’,
‘bread of God’, etc.
(
4) because it is taught by the prophets and not revealed by the natural light
of reason; this is why the Law of Moses is called the law of God.
(
5) to express a thing to a superlative degree, as ‘mountains of God’, i.e., very
high mountains,‘a sleep of God’, i.e., a very deep sleep.This is the sense in which
Amos
4.11 is to be interpreted, when God himself says,‘I overthrew you just as
God’s overthrowing came upon Sodom and Gomorrah’, i.e., just like that
noteworthy overthrow: this is the only possible correct explanation, since it is
God himself who is speaking. Even the natural knowledge of Solomon is called
God’s knowledge, i.e., divine knowledge, or a knowledge that is above ordinary
knowledge. In the Psalms we even ¢nd ‘cedars of God’, to express their
extraordinary height. And at
1 Samuel 11.7 to signify a very great fear, it is said,
‘and the fear of God fell upon the people’. In this sense everything that
surpassed the Jews’ understanding and whose natural causes were unknown at
that time, tended to be attributed to God. Thus a storm was called, ‘a rebuke
from God’, and thunder and lightning the arrows of God; for they thought that
God kept the winds shut up in caverns which they called the treasuries of God,
di¡ering in this belief from the gentiles in that they believed God, not Aeolus,
was their governor. For the same reason miracles are called works of God, that is,
astounding works. For all natural things
24
are undoubtedly works of God and exist
On prophecy
21


and act by divine power. In this sense therefore the Psalmist calls the miracles of
Egypt powers of God, because they opened up a path to safety for the Hebrews in
their extreme danger when they were not expecting any exit to appear, and so
they were totally amazed.
[
24] Since therefore unusual works of nature are termed works of God
and trees of unusual height called trees of God, it is not surprising that in
Genesis the strongest men, men of great stature, are referred to as sons of
God even though they ravish women and consort with prostitutes. The
ancients, gentiles and Jews alike, referred everything to God where one
man excelled others. When Pharaoh heard Joseph’s interpretation of a
dream, he said there was a mind of the gods in him, and Nebuchadnezzar
said to Daniel that he had the mind of the holy gods. It was likewise just as
common among the Romans, who say that things that are skilfully created
have been made by a divine hand; if one wanted to turn this into Hebrew,
one would need to say ‘made by the hand of God’, as is well known to stu-
dents of Hebrew.
[
25] These then are the ways in which biblical passages mentioning the
spirit of God may readily be understood and explained. For example,‘spirit
of God’and ‘spirit of Jehovah’, signify nothing more in some places than an
extremely violent, very dry and fatal wind, as in Isaiah
40.7,‘a wind of God
blew upon him’, i.e., a very dry, lethal wind; also Genesis
1.2: ‘and a wind of
God’ (or, a very powerful wind) ‘moved over the water’.
It can also mean a great heart; for both the heart of Gideon and
Samson is called in Scripture,‘a spirit of God’, that is, a very bold heart,
ready for anything. For in this way any virtue or force out of the ordinary
is designated a ‘spirit’ or ‘virtue’ of God, as in Exodus
31.3‘and I shall ¢ll
him’ (Bezalel) ‘with the spirit of God’, that is (as Scripture itself
explains), with talent and skill above the common lot. So Isaiah
11.2: ‘and
the spirit of God shall rest upon him’, that is, as the prophet himself
speci¢es when he explains this later in the normal manner of the Bible,
the virtue of wisdom, counsel, courage etc. Likewise, the melancholy of
Saul is called ‘an evil spirit from God’, i.e., a most profound melancholy;
for the servants of Saul who called
25
his melancholy a ‘melancholy of God’,
suggested to him that he should summon a musician to ease his spirits
by singing to him, which shows that by a ‘melancholy of God’ they meant
a natural melancholy.
Theological-Political Treatise
22


Further,‘spirit of God’ may mean the human mind itself, as in Job
27.3,
‘and the spirit of God in my nose’, which alludes to the passage in Genesis
in which God blew the breath of life into the nose of man. Thus Ezekiel,
prophesying to the dead, says at
37.14,‘and I will give my spirit to you, and
you will live’, i.e.,‘I will restore life to you’. And in this sense it is said at Job
34.14,‘if he’ (i.e., God) ‘so wills, he will take back to himself his spirit (that
is, the mind which he has given us) and his breath’.This is how Genesis
6.3
is to be understood,‘my spirit will not ever reason’ (or, will not decide) ‘in
man, because he is £esh’; that is, henceforth man will act according to the
decisions of the £esh and not of the mind which I gave him to discern the
good. So also Psalm
51.12^13, ‘create in me a clean heart, O God, and
renew in me a proper’ (or, modest) ‘spirit’ (i.e., desire).‘Do not cast me away
from your sight, nor take the mind of your holiness from me’. Because sins
were believed to arise from the £esh alone, and the mind was believed to
urge nothing but good, he invokes the help of God against the desires of
the £esh, but for the mind which the holy God gave him, he only prays God
to preserve it.
Now since Scripture, deferring to the limitations of the common
people, is accustomed to depict God like a man, and to ascribe to God a
mind and a heart and the passions of the heart, as well as body and
breath,‘the spirit of God’ is often used in the Bible for mind, i.e., heart,
passion, force and the breath of the mouth of God. Thus Isaiah
40.13
says: ‘who has directed the spirit’ (or mind) ‘of God?’ that is, who set the
mind of God to willing anything except God himself ? and
63.10: ‘and
they a¥icted the spirit of his sanctity with bitterness and woe’. And hence
it often comes to be used to designate the Law of Moses because it
explains, as it were, God’s mind, as
26
Isaiah himself states in the same
chapter, verse
11,‘where is’ (he) ‘who has put in the midst of them the
spirit of his sanctity?’ that is, the Law of Moses, as is clearly implied by the
whole context of the speech; and Nehemiah
9.20,‘you gave themyour spirit
or good mind, so that you might make them understand’, for he means the
occasion of the giving of the Law; Deut.
4.6 also alludes to it when Moses
says,‘since it’ (namely the Law) ‘is your knowledge and prudence’, etc. So
also in Psalm
143.10,‘your good mind will lead me into a smooth place’,
that is, your mind revealed to us will lead me into the right way.
The spirit of God, as we have said, also signi¢es the breath of God,
which, like mind, heart and body, is also improperly attributed to God in
Scripture, as in Psalm
33.6.
On prophecy
23




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə