Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə24/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   114

It can also denote the power, force or virtue of God, as at Job
33.4,‘the
spirit of God made me’, i.e., the virtue or power of God, or if you prefer,
the decree of God; for the Psalmist, speaking poetically, even says,‘by the
command of God the heavens were made, and all their host by the spirit’or
breath ‘of his mouth’ (i.e. by his decree, as if it were expressed as a breath).
Likewise at Psalm
139.7,‘whither shall I go’ (that I may be) ‘beyond your
spirit, or whither shall I £ee’ (that I may be) ‘beyond your sight?’, that is (as
is clear from the way the Psalmist continues here),‘whither can I go that
I may be beyond your power and presence?’
Finally,‘the spirit of God’ is used in Scripture to express the sentiments
of God’s heart, namely, his kindness and mercy, as in Micah
2.7: ‘surely the
spirit of God’ (i.e. the mercy of God) ‘has not been straitened? Are these’
(dreadful) ‘things his works?’ Likewise Zechariah
4.6,‘not by an army, not
by force, but by my spirit alone’, that is, by my mercy alone. In this sense,
too, I think, we must understand
7.12 of the same prophet:‘and they made
their hearts hard as rock,
8
so that they would not obey the Law and the
commands which God sent from his spirit’ (i.e., from his mercy) ‘by means
of the ¢rst prophets’. In this sense too Haggai says at
2.5,‘and my spirit’ (or
my grace) ‘remains among you; do not be afraid’.
The phrase of Isaiah at
48.16,‘but now
27
the Lord God and his spirit have
sent me’, can also be understood of God’s kindness and mercy, though it
might refer rather to God’s mind as revealed in the Law. For Isaiah says:
‘From the beginning’ (that is, as soon as I came to you, that I might preach
the wrath of God and the judgment he has pronounced against you) ‘I have
not spoken secretly; from the time that the sentence was’ (pronounced),
‘I have been with you’ (as Isaiah himself had testi¢ed in ch.
7
); ‘but now’, he
continues,‘I am a glad messenger, sent by the mercy of God, that I may sing of
your restoration.’ This passage may indeed, as I said, be understood of the
mind of God as revealed in the Law: on this interpretation, Isaiah has come to
warn them (in obedience to the command of the Law at Leviticus
19.17), and
does so in the same conditions and in the same manner as Moses had done,
and ends, like Moses, by predicting their restoration. However the former
interpretation [that it refers to God’s mercy] seems to me the more probable.
[
26] To return, after all this, to our main point: scriptural expressions
such as ‘the spirit of God was in the prophet’,‘God poured his spirit into
8
Reading cautem as suggested by Fokke Akkerman.
Theological-Political Treatise
24


men’, ‘men were ¢lled with the spirit of God and with holy spirit’, etc.,
become perfectly clear. These merely mean that the prophets had a
unique and extraordinary virtue,
9
and cultivated piety with a unique
constancy of purpose. Such expressions also denote that they perceived
the mind or thought of God; for ‘spirit’ in Hebrew, as we showed, sig-
ni¢es both a mind and the thought of a mind, and for this reason the Law
itself was called the spirit or mind of God because it disclosed God’s
mind; and in as much as the decrees of God were revealed through the
imagination of the prophets, their imagination could with equal right
also be designated the mind of God. God’s mind and his eternal thoughts
are indeed inscribed on our minds also, and consequently we too per-
ceive the mind of God (to speak in biblical terms), but natural knowledge,
as we have already noted, is not highly regarded by men because it is
common to all, and in particular was not prized by the Hebrews, who
thought very highly of themselves, and were even prone to despise other
peoples and consequently to disdain such knowledge as is common to
everyone. Finally the prophets were said to have the spirit of God because
men were ignorant of the causes of prophetic knowledge, though they
also admired it, and therefore, as with other extraordinary things, they
tended to ascribe it to God and to
28
call it God’s knowledge.
[
27] We can therefore now assert, without reservation, that the pro-
phets perceived things revealed by God by way of their imagination, that
is via words or visions which may have been either real or imaginary.
These are the only means that we ¢nd in Scripture and we are not per-
mitted to invent others, as we have already shown. But I confess that I do
not know by what natural laws prophetic insight occurred. I might, like
others, have said that it occurred by the power of God, but then I would
be saying nothing meaningful. For this would be the same as explaining
the shape of some individual thing by means of a transcendental term.
For everything is done by the power of God. Indeed, because the power
of nature is nothing other than the power of God itself, it is certain that
we fail to understand the power of God to the extent that we are ignorant
of natural causes. Therefore it is foolish to have recourse to this same
power of God when we are ignorant of the natural cause of some thing,
which is, precisely, the power of God. In any case, there is no need for us
9
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
3.
On prophecy
25


at this point to know the cause of prophetic knowledge. For as I
have already pointed out, here we are only trying to examine the teach-
ings of Scripture in order to draw our conclusions from them, as we
would from facts of nature; we are not concerned with the causes of these
teachings.
[
28] Since therefore the prophets perceived the things revealed by God
through their imaginations, there is no doubt that they may have grasped
much beyond the limits of the intellect. For far more ideas can be formed
from words and images than from the principles and concepts alone on
which all our natural knowledge is built.
[
29] It also becomes clear why the prophets understood and taught
almost everything in parables and allegorically, expressing all spiritual
matters in corporeal language; for the latter are well suited to the nature
of our imagination. Neither shall we any longer be surprised that Scrip-
ture or the prophets speak so inappropriately and obscurely about the
spirit or mind of God, as at Numbers
11.17, 1 Kings 22.2, etc., or that
Micah saw God seated, Daniel saw him as an old man dressed in white
clothes, and Ezekiel as a ¢re, while those who were with Christ saw him as
a dove descending, the Apostles saw him as tongues of ¢re, while Paul,
when he was ¢rst converted, saw
29
him as a great light. For all this is clearly
well suited to the imaginings of ordinary men about God and spirits.
[
30] Finally it is because imagination is capricious and changeable that
prophecy did not remain long with the prophets, and was not at all com-
mon but very rare, occurring in just a handful of men, and in them only
very occasionally.
[
31] Since this is so, we are now compelled to ask what could be the
source of the prophets’ assuredness or certainty about things which they
perceived only via the imagination and not from clear reasoning of the
mind. Whatever can be ascertained about this must also be derived from
Scripture, since we do not have true knowledge of the matter (as we have
said), that is, we cannot explain it by its ¢rst causes.What the Bible teaches
about the prophets’ assuredness, I shall explain in the
next chapter
, where
I propose to discuss the prophets.
Theological-Political Treatise
26




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə