Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə25/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   114

chapter 2
On the prophe ts
[
1 ] It fol l ows f ro m t h e 
p revi o u s c h apte r
, a s we h ave p o i n te d o ut , t h a t t h e
prophets were not endowed with more perfect minds than others but
only a more vivid power of imagination, as the scriptural narratives also
abundantly show. It is clear from the case of Solomon, for instance, that
he excelled others in wisdom but not in the gift of prophecy. Heman,
Darda and Calcol
1
were also very discerning men but they were not pro-
phets. On the other hand, rustic fellows without any education, and
insigni¢cant women like Hagar, the serving girl of Abraham, were
endowed with the prophetic gift.
2
This also accords with experience
and reason. Those who are most powerful in imagination are less good
at merely understanding things; those who have trained and powerful
intellects have a more modest power of imagination and have it under
better control, reining it in, so to speak, and not confusing it with
understanding. Consequently those who look in the books of the pro-
phets for wisdom and a knowledge of natural and spiritual things are
completely on the wrong track. I propose to explain this here at some
length, since the times in which we live, philosophy, and the subject
itself require me to do so without worrying about the outcry from
credulous people who detest none
30
more than those who cultivate real
knowledge and true life. Distressingly, it has now come to the point that
people who freely admit that they do not possess the idea of God and
know him only through created things (whose causes they are ignorant
of ), do not hesitate to accuse philosophers of atheism.
1
1 Kings 4:29^31 extols the wisdom of Solomon and adds that it surpassed the wisdom of Heman,
Darda and Calcol among others.
2
Genesis
16.7^13.
27


[
2] In order to treat this subject in proper order, I will show that
prophecies have varied not only in accordance with the imagination and
temperament of each individual prophet, but also according to the beliefs
in which he was brought up. That is why prophecy has never made pro-
phets more learned, as I shall explain presently at greater length. But we
must ¢rst discuss their certainty or assuredness both because it concerns
the argument of this chapter, and because it also goes some way towards
demonstrating what we intend to demonstrate.
[
3] Plain imagination does not of its own nature provide certainty, as
every clear and distinct idea does. In order that we may be certain of what
we imagine, imagination must necessarily be assisted by something, and
that something is reason. It follows from this that prophecy by itself can-
not provide certainty, because as we have already shown, prophecy depends
upon imagination alone. It was not because of the revelation itself there-
fore that the prophets were assured that they had received a revelation
from God but because of some sign. This is clear from the case of
Abraham (see Genesis
15.8): when he heard God’s promise, he asked for a
sign. He believed God, and asked for a sign not in order to have faith in
God but so as to know that it was a promise from God. The same thing
is even plainer in the case of Gideon: this is what he says to God, ‘and
make me a sign’ (so that I may know) ‘that you are speaking with me’
(see Judges
6.17). God also tells Moses,‘and let this be a sign to you that
I have sent you’.
3
Hezekiah, who had long known that Isaiah was a
prophet, asked for a sign con¢rming Isaiah’s prophecy predicting that
he would be healed. This shows that the prophets always received a sign
assuring them of what they had prophetically imagined, and for that
reason Moses admonishes the Hebrews (Deuteronomy
18, ¢nal verse) to
seek a sign from prophets, such as the outcome of some future event.
In this respect, consequently, prophecy is inferior to natural knowledge
since it has no need of any sign but provides certainty by its very nature.
For this prophetic certainty was not mathematical certainty but only moral
certainty. This is also made plain
31
by Scripture; for in Deuteronomy
13,
Moses admonishes that, should any prophet attempt to teach of new gods,
he is to be condemned to death, even if he con¢rms his teaching by signs
and miracles, for, as Moses himself goes on to say, God [also] o¡ers signs
3
Exodus
3.12.
Theological-Political Treatise
28


and miracles to test the people. Christ too warned his disciples of this,
as is clear from Matthew
24.24. Ezekiel 14.9 plainly teaches that God
sometimes deceives men by false revelations: he says,‘and when a pro-
phet’ (that is, a false prophet) ‘is deceived and has spoken a word, it is
I God that has deceived that prophet’. Micaiah says the same thing
about the prophets of Ahab (see
1 Kings 22.21).
[
4] Although this might seem to show that prophecy and revelation are
something altogether dubious, yet, as we have said, it did have a good deal
of certainty. For God never deceives the pious and the elect, but as the
ancient proverb says (see
1 Samuel 24.14), and as the narrative of Abigail
and her prayer makes clear, God uses the pious as the instruments of his
own piety, and the impious as the agents and executors of his wrath.This is
abundantly clear from the case of Micaiah, just cited; for though God had
determined to deceive Ahab by means of prophets, he made use only of
false prophets, and revealed the truth of the matter to a pious man and did
not forbid him to tell the truth. However, as I said, the certainty of a pro-
phet was only a moral certainty, since nobody can justify himself before
God or claim to be an instrument of divine piety, as Scripture itself teaches
and is evident from the thing itself: thus the wrath of God misled David
into counting the people, yet Scripture abundantly testi¢es to his piety.
[
5] All prophetic certainty therefore was grounded upon three things:
(
1) that the matters revealed were very vividly imagined, as we are a¡ected
by objects when we are awake;
(
2) upon a sign; and
(
3) most importantly, that the minds of the prophets were directed
exclusively to what is right and good.
Scripture does not always actually mention a sign, but we must never-
theless suppose that the prophets always had one. The Bible does not
always mention every condition and circumstance (as many have already
noted) but assumes some things as known.
32
We may further grant that the
prophets who prophesied nothing new beyond what is contained in the
Law of Moses, had no need of a sign, because they were corroborated by
the Law. For example the prophecy of Jeremiah about the destruction
of Jerusalem was con¢rmed by the prophecies of the other prophets and
by the admonitions of the Law, and therefore did not need a sign. But
On the prophets
29




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə