Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə28/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   114

he heard the sentence against the
38
men of Sodom, he prayed that God
would not carry it out until he knew whether all of them deserved that
punishment; for he says (see Genesis
18.24),‘perhaps there are ¢fty just
men in that city’. Nor was God revealed to him as any other than this [i.e. a
being of limited knowledge who has descended to Sodom to see how many
just men there are there]; for this is how God speaks in Abraham’s ima-
gining: ‘now I will go down, so that I may see whether they have indeed
acted as reported by the great outcry which has come to me, and if it is not
so, I will know it’.
12
Equally, the divine testimony concerning Abraham (on
which see Genesis
18.19) contains only the requirement that he should
obey and instruct his servants regarding what is just and good, saying
nothing about higher conceptions of God.
Nor did Moses adequately grasp that God is omniscient and directs
all human actions by his decree alone. For although God had said (see
Exodus
3.18) that the Israelites would obey him, he nevertheless doubted
this and replied (see Exodus
4.1): ‘what if they do not believe me or obey
me?’ Thus to him also God was revealed as uninvolved and ignorant of
future human actions. For God gave him two signs and said (Exodus
4.8),
‘should it happen that they do not believe the ¢rst, they should believe the
latter; but should they not believe this one either, (then) take a little water
from the river’, etc.
In fact, anyone who re£ects on Moses’ opinions without prejudice, will
plainly see that he believed God to be a being that has always existed, exists
and will always exist, and for this reason he calls him ‘Jehovah’ by name,
which in Hebrew expresses these three tenses of existence. But Moses
taught nothing else about his nature except that he is merciful, kind, etc.,
and in the highest degree jealous, as is clear from several passages in the
Pentateuch. He also believed and taught that this being is so di¡erent from
all other beings that he cannot be represented by the image of any visible
thing nor even be seen himself, owing less to the impossibility of the thing
in itself than to human limitations; as regards his power, furthermore, he
deemed him a singular or unique being. Moses did indeed concede that
there are beings who (doubtless by the order and command of God) acted
in God’s name, that is, beings to whom God gave authority, right and
power to govern nations and to provide and care for them. But he taught
that the being whom they were
39
obliged to worship is the highest and
12
Genesis
18.21.
Theological-Political Treatise
36


supreme God, or (to use the Hebrew phrase) ‘the God of gods’, and there-
fore in the book of Exodus (
15.11) he said,‘who among gods is like you,
Jehovah?’ and Jethro says (
18.11),‘now I know that Jehovah is greater than
all gods’, that is, I am ¢nally compelled to admit to Moses that Jehovah is
greater than all other gods and unequalled in power. But one may doubt
whether Moses believed that these beings acting in God’s name were created
by God; he said nothing, so far as we know, about their creation and origin.
He also taught that this being reduced the visible world from chaos to
order (see Genesis
1.2), and sowed the seeds of nature, and therefore has
supreme jurisdiction and supreme power over all things. Hence he (see
Deuteronomy
10.14^15) chose the Hebrew nation for himself alone by this
his supreme right and supreme power, together with a certain region of the
earth (see Deuteronomy
4.19, 32.8^9), and left the other nations and ter-
ritories to the care of other gods who had been put there by himself.That is
why he was called the God of Israel and the God of Jerusalem (see
2
Chronicles
32.19), and the other gods were called the gods of other nations.
This is also the reason why the Jews believed that the territory God had
chosen for them required the exclusive worship of God, and one which was
very di¡erent from the cults of other lands, and which could not in fact
permit the worship of other gods proper to other parts. The peoples that
the Assyrian king brought into the land of the Jews were believed to have
been torn apart by lions because they were ignorant of the [correct] form of
divine worship of that country (see
2 Kings 17.25, 26, etc.). According to
Ibn Ezra,
13
Jacob told his children when setting out to ¢nd his native land,
that they should prepare themselves for a new form of worship and lay
aside alien gods, that is the worship of the gods of the land in which they
then were (see Genesis
35.2, 3). Alsowhen David informed Saul that he had
been forced, by the latter’s persecution of him, to live in exile from his
native land, he said that he had been driven from God’s inheritance and
obliged to serve other gods (see
1 Samuel 26.19). Finally, Moses believed
that this being, or God, had his home in the heavens (see Deuteronomy
33.27), a belief which was then very current among the gentiles.
[
15] If we now consider the revelations of Moses, we shall see that they
were adapted to these beliefs. He
40
believed that the nature of God was
13
Abraham Ibn Ezra (
1089^1164) of Tudela (northern Spain) was one of the major medieval Jewish
Bible commentators.
On the prophets
37


subject to the emotions we have spoken of ^ mercy, kindness, etc. ^ and
therefore God was revealed to him in conformity with this belief of his
and under these attributes: see Exodus
34.6^7, which tells how God
appeared to Moses, and verses
4 and 5 of theTen Commandments. Again
at
33.18 we are told how Moses beseeched God to allow him to see him;
but as Moses, as already said, had formed no image of God in his mind,
and God (as I have already shown) is only revealed to the prophets
according to the tenor of their own imagination, God did not appear to
him in an image. The reason for this, I say, is that it con£icted with
Moses’ own imagination; for other prophets ^ Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel,
etc. ^ testify that they have seen God. It was also for this reason that God
replied to Moses, ‘you will not be able to see my face’. Because Moses
believed that God was visible, i.e., that this implies no contradiction on
the part of the divine nature ^ for otherwise he would not have made any
such request ^ God adds,‘since no one shall see me and live’, thus giving a
reason which ¢ts in with Moses’ own belief. He does not say that it
implies a contradiction on the part of the divine nature, as in fact it does,
but rather that it cannot be done because of human incapacity. After-
wards, when God revealed to Moses that in worshipping a calf the Israe-
lites had become like other nations, He says at
33.2^3 that He will send
an angel (i.e. a being that would take care of the Israelites in place of the
supreme being) and does not wish to be with them Himself. Conse-
quently, Moses had nothing left to prove that the Israelites were dearer to
God than other nations, since God also entrusted them to the care of
other beings, or angels, as is clear from verse
16 of the same chapter.
Finally, because He was believed to reside in the heavens, God was
revealed as descending from heaven on to a mountain, and Moses even
ascended the mountain to speak with God, which he would have had no
need to do had he been able to imagine God readily everywhere.
The Hebrews knew almost nothing of God, despite His having been
revealed to them, as they made very plain a few days later when they
transferred to a calf the honour and worship due to Him, and identi¢ed
this with the gods they believed had brought them out of Egypt. In fact it is
hardly likely that people accustomed
41
to Egyptian superstition, who were
primitive and reduced to the most abject slavery, should have any sound
conception of God, or that Moses taught them anything other than a way
of life, and that not as a philosopher, so that they might eventually live well,
from liberty of mind, but as a legislator obliging them to live well by
Theological-Political Treatise
38




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə