Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə31/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   114

were never peculiar to any one nation
47
but were always common to the
entire human race, unless we want to delude ourselves that once upon a
time nature created di¡erent species of men.The factors conducing to safe
living and conserving the body,on the other hand,lie chie£y in external things
and are consequently called gifts of fortune because theydepend mostly upon
the direction of external causes of which we are ignorant. Hence, in this
respect, a foolish person is almost as happy or unhappy as a wise person.
Even so, human intervention and vigilance can do much to help us live
in safety and to avoid injury from other people and from animals. For this
purpose, reason and experience have taught us no surer means than to
establish a society with ¢xed laws, to occupy a determinate region of our
earth and to bring everyone’s resources into one body, if we may call it that,
the body of a society. But to establish and conserve a society, much intelli-
gence and vigilance is required. Therefore that society will be safer, more
stable and less vulnerable to fortune, which is for the most part founded
and directed by wise and vigilant men. On the other hand, a society that
consists of men of limited intelligence depends for the most part on for-
tune and is less stable. If in spite of this it has proved to be lasting, this will
be due, not to its own policies, but to someone else’s. Indeed, if it has
overcome great dangers and its a¡airs have prospered, it can do no other
than admire and adore God’s government (that is, in so far as God acts
through hidden external causes and not as He acts through human nature
and the human mind). For everything that happened to that society was
beyond expectation and beyond belief and this can truly be considered a
miracle.
[
6] Hence, nations are distinguished one from another only by the [form
of ] society and laws in which they live and under which they are governed.
The Hebrew people, accordingly, was chosen by God above others not for
its understanding or for its qualities of mind, but owing to the form of its
society and the good fortune, over so many years, with which it shaped and
preserved its state. This is also fully evident from the Bible itself. Anyone
who peruses it even super¢cially will clearly see that the Hebrews excelled
other peoples in merely one thing: they conducted the a¡airs that a¡ected
their security of life successfully and overcame great dangers, and did so,
on the whole, solely through God’s external assistance. In other respects,
they were on the same footing as
48
the rest of the nations, and God favoured
all equally.
Theological-Political Treatise
46


For as regards comprehending reality, it is clear (as we showed in the
last
chapter
) that they had entirely commonplace notions of God and nature,
and thus they were not chosen by God, above others, for their under-
standing. Nor was it for their virtue or [attainment of ] the true life; for in
this respect too they were on the same footing as other nations and very
few were chosen. Their election and vocation therefore lay only in the
success and the prosperity at that time of their commonwealth. Nor do we
see that God promised anything other than this to the patriarchs
3
or their
successors. In fact nothing else is promised in the Bible in return for their
obedience but the continued prosperity of their state and the other good
things of this life; while, conversely, for disobedience and the breaking of
the covenant, they are threatened with the ruin of their polity and severe
hardship. And no wonder; for the aim of all society and every state (as is
clear from what we have just said and will show more fully later) is [for
men] to live securely and satisfyingly, and a state cannot survive except
by means of laws that bind every individual. If all the members of a
society disregard the laws, they will, by that very action, dissolve society
and destroy the state. Therefore nothing more could be promised to the
society of the Hebrews in return for their constant observance of the
laws than security of life and its advantages. On the other hand no surer
retribution could be threatened for their disobedience than the destruc-
tion of the state and the bad consequences that generally follow, besides
the special su¡erings they would undergo resulting from the ruin of
their own commonwealth, though there is no need to discuss this at
greater length here. I would add merely that the laws of the Old Testa-
ment too were revealed and prescribed only to the Jews; for since God
chose them alone to form a particular commonwealth and state, they had
necessarily to have unique laws as well.
[
7] In my opinion, it is not entirely clear whether God also gave speci¢c
laws to other nations and revealed himself to their legislators in a prophe-
tic manner (i.e., under the attributes in which they were accustomed to
imagine God). But it is evident from Scripture, at least, that other nations
also acquired their own particular laws and government via God’s external
direction. To demonstrate this, I will cite just two passages. At Genesis
14.18^20 we are told that Melchizedekwas king of Jerusalem and priest of
2
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
4.
3
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
5.
On the vocation of the Hebrews
47


the most high God, and that he
49
blessed Abraham, as was the right of a
priest (see Numbers
6.23), and that Abraham, the beloved of God, gave a
tenth part of all his booty to this priest of God. All this su⁄ciently shows
that, before God founded the Israelite nation, he had appointed kings and
priests in Jerusalem and given them rites and laws; although as I said, it is
not wholly clear whether he did so by means of prophecy. In any case, I am
convinced that while Abraham lived there he lived religiously, according to
those laws: for he received no rites speci¢cally from God, but nevertheless
it is stated in Genesis
26.5 that Abraham observed the cult, precepts,
practices and laws of God, and this must certainly be construed as mean-
ing the cult, precepts, practices and laws of king Melchizedeck. Malachi
1.10^11 reproaches the Jews in these terms: ‘Who is there among you to
close the doors’ (i.e. of the Temple) ‘lest the ¢re be placed in vain on my
altar? I take no delight in you, etc. . . . for from the rising of the sun even to
its setting, my name is great among the nations, and everywhere incense is
brought to me, and a pure o¡ering; for my name is great among the
nations, says the God of hosts’. If we do not want to do violence to these
words, which can only refer to Malachi’s own time, we must surely grant
that Malachi provides very clear evidence that the Jews in his time were no
more beloved of God than other peoples; indeed, that God had made
himself more conspicuous by miracles to other nations than to the Jews
who, without [the aid of ] miracles, had at that time partly recovered their
state; and that the other peoples had rites and ceremonies which made
them acceptable to God.
But I leave all this aside, for it su⁄ces for my purposes to show that the
election of the Jews concerned only their material welfare at that time and
their freedom, or independent state, and the manner and means by which
they acquired it. It therefore also concerned their laws, in so far as these
were essential to stabilizing that particular polity; and ¢nally the way in
which these laws were revealed. But as regards everything else, including
those things in which the true happiness of man consists, they were on the
same footing as other men.
When therefore it is said in the Bible (see Deuteronomy
4.7) that no
people has their gods ‘so near to
50
them’ as the Jews have God, this is to be
understood only with regard to their state and only in that period in which
so many miracles took place among them, etc. For as regards intellect and
virtue, i.e., as regards happiness, as we have already said and proven by
reason itself, God is equally favourable to all, as is indeed evident from
Theological-Political Treatise
48




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə