Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə35/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   114

chapter 4
On the divine law
[
1] The word law (lex) in an absolute sense signi¢es that, in accordance
with which, each individual thing, or all things, or all things of the same
kind, behave in one and the same ¢xed and determined way, depending
upon either natural necessity or a human decision. A law that depends
upon natural necessity is one that necessarily follows from the very nature
or de¢nition of a thing. A law that depends upon a human decision, which
is more properly called a decree ( jus), is one that men prescribe to them-
selves and to others in order to achieve a better and safer life, or for other
reasons. For example, the fact that when one body strikes a smaller body, it
only loses as much of its own motion as it communicates to the other, is a
universal law of all bodies which follows
58
from natural necessity. So too the
fact that when a man recalls one thing he immediately remembers another
which is similar or which he had seen along with the ¢rst thing, is a law
which necessarily follows from human nature.
But the fact that men give up their right which they receive from nature,
or are compelled to give it up, and commit themselves to a particular rule
of life depends on human decision. And while I entirely agree that all
things are determined by the universal laws of nature to exist and act in a
¢xed and determined manner, I insist that these decrees depend on willed
human decision, and I do so for two reasons. Firstly, in so far as man is a
part of nature, he is also a part of nature’s power. Hence whatever follows
from the necessity of human nature (that is, from nature itself in so far as
we understand it to be expressly determined by human nature) results also,
albeit necessarily, from the capacity of men. Hence the decreeing of these
laws may quite correctly be said to follow from human will, because this
depends especially on the power of the human mind in the sense that our
57


mind, so far as it perceives what is true or false, can very clearly be conceived
without these decrees, but not without the necessary law of nature as we have
just de¢ned it. Secondly, I have said that these laws depend upon human
decisions because we ought to de¢ne and explain things by their proximate
causes, and a general consideration of necessity and the connectedness of
causes cannot help us at all in the formation and ordering of particular
things. We are also ignorant of the actual coordination and connectedness
of things, that is, of how things are really ordered and connected, and
therefore it is better and indeed necessary for the conduct of life, to regard
things as possible. So much about law considered in an absolute sense.
[
2] It seems to be only by a metaphor that the word law (lex) is applied to
natural things. What is commonly meant by a law is a command which
men may or may not follow, since a law constrains human powers within
certain limits which they naturally exceed, and does not command any-
thing beyond their scope. Law therefore seems to have to be de¢ned more
precisely as ‘a rule for living which a man prescribes to himself or others for
some purpose’. But the real purpose of laws is normally evident only to a
few; most people are more or less
59
incapable of grasping it, and hardly live
by reason at all. Hence legislators have wisely contrived (in order to con-
strain all men equally) another purpose very di¡erent from the one which
necessarily follows from the nature of laws. They promise to those who
keep the laws things that the common people most desire, and threaten
those who violate them with what they most fear. In this way they have tried
to restrain the common people like a horse with a bridle, so far as it can be
done. This is why the essence of law is taken to be a rule of life pre-
scribed to men by the command of another; and consequently those who
obey the laws are said to live under law and are regarded as subjects of it.
Truly he who gives other men what is due to them because he fears the
gallows, is acting at the behest of another man and under a threat of suf-
fering harm, and cannot be called just; but he who gives other men what is
due to them because he knows the true rationale of laws and understands
their necessity, is acting steadfastly and at his own and not another’s com-
mand, and therefore is deservedly called just. I think this is what Paul
meant to point out when he said that those who lived under the law could
not be justi¢ed by the law.
1
For justice as it is commonly de¢ned, is
1
Epistle to the Romans
3.20.
Theological-Political Treatise
58


‘a constant and perpetual will to assign to each man his due’,
2
and this is
why the Proverbs of Solomon
21.15 says that the righteous man is happy
when judgment comes but the unjust are afraid.
[
3] Since law, accordingly, is nothing other than a rule for living which
men prescribe to themselves or to others for a purpose, it seems it has to be
divided into human and divine. By human law I mean a rule for living
whose only purpose is to protect life and preserve the country. By divine
law I mean the law which looks only to the supreme good, that is, to the
true knowledge and love of God. The reason why I call this law divine is
because of the nature of the supreme good, which I will now explain here as
brie£y and clearly as I can.
[
4] Since the best part of us is our understanding, it is certain that, if we
truly want to seek our own interest, we should try above all things to per-
fect it as much as possible; for our highest good should consist in its per-
fection. Furthermore, since all our knowledge and the certainty which
truly takes away all doubt depends on a knowledge of God alone, and since
without God nothing can exist or be conceived, and since we are in doubt
about everything as long as we have no
60
clear and distinct idea of God, it
follows that our highest good and perfection depends on a knowledge of
God alone, etc. Again, since nothing can exist or be conceived without
God, it is certain that every single thing in nature involves and expresses
the conception of God as far as its essence and perfection allows, and
accordingly the more we come to understand natural things, the greater
and more perfect the knowledge of God we acquire. Further (since knowl-
edge of an e¡ect through a cause is simply to know some property of the
cause) the more we learn about natural things, the more perfectly we come
to know the essence of God (which is the cause of all things); and thus all
our knowledge, that is, our highest good, not only depends on a knowledge
of God but consists in it altogether. This also follows from the fact that a
man is more perfect (and the opposite) according to the nature and per-
fection of what he loves above all other things; and therefore that man is
necessarily most perfect and most participates in the highest happiness
who most loves and most enjoys, above all other things, the intellectual
knowledge of God, who is the most perfect being.
2
Justinian, Institutes
1.1.
On the divine law
59




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə