Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə4/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114

what chie£y sets it at odds with the text criticism of all varieties of
contemporary Postmodernism, is precisely its insistence that there can be
no understanding of any text which is not in the ¢rst place a ‘historical’
interpretation setting writings in their intellectual context,‘historical’ now
being de¢ned in a highly innovative and naturalistic sense.The ‘historical’
in Spinoza’s sense (which is also the characteristic ‘modern’ meaning ) was
in fact conceptually impossible until, philosophically, all supernatural
agency had been consciously stripped out of all forms of historical
explanation, a development that was remote from the thoughts of most
early modern thinkers and writers.
It is hence insu⁄cient, according to Spinoza’s rules of criticism, to know
the language in which a text is composed, and be familiar with its
characteristic idioms, usages and grammar. Of course, one must ¢rst
determine the grammatical signi¢cation of a given passage as accurately as
possible; but one must then be able to locate this sensus literalis [literal
sense] as a fragment of a wider complex of beliefs and notions, a self-
de¢ning and contained, if rarely coherent, human system of ideas and
assumptions about the world. One must also take account of speci¢c
political circumstances at the time, as well as of motives, ambitions and
preoccupations typical of that context. All of this then in turn needs to be
explained, philosophically, as a product of nature and natural forces. Here
was an idea which depended on a prior theory of culture and religion such
as that embodied, since the mid
1660s, in Spinoza’s not yet completed
Ethics ^ his principal work but one which was not published until late
1677,
some months after his death and more than seven years after the
appearance of the Theological-Political Treatise. It was a ‘revolutionary’
theory in the most fundamental sense of the term.
For Spinoza, all religions and human dogmas are forms of belief
concerned with imagined transcendental realities answering to men’s
deepest psychological and emotional needs and concerns. The life of
primitive man, he surmises, much like Hobbes, was highly insecure,
fearful and uncomprehending. Religion in his terms is thus a purely
natural phenomenon especially in the sense that human emotions, as he
argues in the appendix to Part One of the Ethics, are so structured as to lead
us to attribute anthropomorphic and teleological explanations to natural
phenomena. This applies particularly to all occurrences that we do not
understand, especially those that ¢ll men with dread. It is natural, he
believes, for men to become deeply fearful in the face of natural
xiii
Introduction


occurrences they cannot explain in ordinary terms and assume that there
really is a transcendental order existing on high outside our imaginations
which governs those forces, and that some exceptionally chosen or
inspired men, blessed with divine favour, enjoy special access to these
invisible higher beings and values which the great majority of humans
utterly lack.This access then confers on them a power and status far above
that of ordinary men.
To reconstruct the meaning of a text successfully, holds Spinoza, every
relevant historical detail about those who wrote it, its circumstances
of composition, revision, reception and subsequent preservation and
copying, as well as changes in linguistic usage and concepts, must be
meticulously examined. Likewise, one must consider the fact that language
is employed di¡erently not only from period to period but also by the
learned and unlearned; and while it is the former who conserve and
propagate texts, it is not chie£y they who ¢x the meaning of words or how
they are used. If it often happens, by intention or error, that scribes and
scholars afterwards alter wording or even subvert the meaning of whole
passages of written text, or construe them in new ways, no one can change
the way current words and phrases are understood in a given society, at a
particular place and time, so that by correlating everything relevant to a
given usage within a speci¢c historical period, a methodology can be devised
for detecting subsequent corruptions of wording, misinterpretation,
interpolation and falsi¢cation. Even so, we often lack su⁄cient historical
data, he warns, to justify even the most tentative e¡orts to clarify obscure
passages.
While his emphatic rejection of all a priori assumptions about its revealed
status and his rigorous linguistic and historical empiricism are undoubtedly
key features of Spinoza’s Bible criticism, it is nevertheless incorrect to infer
from this that his method was, as has been claimed, basically a ‘bottom-up,
inductive approach ^ more British-looking than Continental’ ^ or maintain
that ‘Spinoza wants to start not with general presuppositions, whether
theological or philosophical dogma, but with particulars and facts ^ with
history ^ and then work his way up to broader generalizations’.
8
Far from
dramatically contrasting his approach with that of the many Cartesians of
his time, or likening it to that of the ‘other great propagator of a new
philosophy and patron of the new sciences, Sir Francis Bacon, whose works
8
Ibid.,
160^1.
xiv
Introduction


Spinoza knew in detail’, the systematic di¡erentiation between the natural
and supernatural on which Spinoza’s philosophical naturalism insists rests
intellectually on a reworking of the Cartesian conception of nature and a
drastic reformulation of Descartes’ idea of substance. In other words, he
begins with lots of prejudgments about the real meaning of texts. Had
Spinoza really admired and emulated Bacon (of whom in fact he was rather
disdainful), and had the ‘contours of Bacon’s thought’and the more narrowly
experimental empiricism of the Royal Society really been closely akin to
Spinoza’s approach, the result would certainly have been a complete inability
either to envisage and treat history as a purely natural process devoid of
supernatural forces or to treat all texts wholly alike. Had Spinoza’s austere
empiricism genuinely been akin to that of Boyle or Locke (in fact it was very
di¡erent), it would certainly have led him to a much more reverential and
literalist conception of the Bible, and willingness to endorse the reality of
miracles and prophesy, of the sort Bacon, Boyle, Locke, Newton and their
followers actually evinced.
Far from strictly eschewing ‘general presuppositions’, Spinoza’s text
criticism, then, was ¢rmly anchored in his post-Cartesian metaphysics
without which his novel conception of history as something shaped
exclusively by natural forces would certainly have been inconceivable.
Spinoza’s philosophical system and his austerely empirical conception of
text criticism and experimental science are, in fact, wholly inseparable. His
particular brand of empiricism, important though it is to the structure of his
thought, in no way detracts from the fact that his metaphysical premises,
rooted in one-substance doctrine, result from con£ating extension (body)
and mind (soul) in such a way as to lead him ^ quite unlike the members of
the Royal Society, or followers of Boyle, Locke or Newton ^ to reduce all
reality including the entirety of human experience, the world of tradition,
spirit and belief no less than the physical, to the level of the purely empirical.
This was Spinoza’s principal innovation and strength as a text critic. But at
the same time it is an inherent feature of his system (and his clash with
Boyle) and more generally, part of the radical current which evolved in late
seventeenth-century Dutch thought, in the work of writers such as
Franciscus van den Enden (
1602^74), Lodewijk Meyer (1629^81), Adriaen
Koerbagh (
1632^69), and Abraham Johannes Cu¡eler (c. 1637^94) and the
late works of Pierre Bayle (
1647^1706), at Rotterdam. Itwas a current of Early
Enlightenment thought altogether distinct from both the Lockean and
Newtonian strands of the British Enlightenment, to which indeed it was
xv
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə