Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə44/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   114

is not distinct from God’s will, we showed that we are asserting the same
thing when we say that God wills something as when we say that God
understands it. Hence by the same necessity by which it follows from the
divine nature and perfection that God understands some thing as it is, it
also follows that God wills it as it is. But since nothing is necessarily true
except by divine decree alone, it most clearly follows that the universal
laws of nature are simply God’s decrees
83
and follow from the necessity
and perfection of the divine nature. If anything therefore were to happen
in nature that contradicted its universal laws, it would also necessarily
contradict the decree and understanding and nature of God. Or if any-
one were to assert that God does anything contrary to the laws of nature,
he would at the same time be compelled to assert that God acts contrary
to his own nature, than which nothing is more absurd. The same thing
can also easily be shown from the fact that the power of nature is the
divine power and virtue itself, and the divine power is the very essence of
God, but this I am happy to leave aside for the time being.
[
4] Consequently, nothing happens in nature
1
that contradicts its uni-
versal laws; and nothing occurs which does not conform to those laws or
follow from them. For whatever happens, happens by God’s will and his
eternal decree, i.e., as we have already shown, whatever happens, happens
according to laws and rules which involve eternal necessity and truth.
Nature therefore always observes laws and rules which involve eternal
necessity and truth ^ albeit not all are known to us ^ and therefore also
a ¢xed and immutable order. No sound reasoning convinces us that we
should attribute only a limited power and virtue to nature or believe its
laws are suited to certain things only and not to all. For, since the virtue
and power of nature is the very virtue and power of God and the laws
and rules of nature are the very decrees of God, we must certainly
believe that the power of nature is in¢nite, and its laws so broad as to
extend to everything that is also conceived by the divine understanding.
For otherwise what are we saying but that God has created a nature so
impotent and with laws and rules so feeble that He must continually give
it a helping hand, to maintain it and keep things going as He wills; this
I certainly consider to be completely unreasonable.
1
Spinoza’s footnote: note that here I mean not only matter and its properties, but other in¢nite
things besides matter.
On miracles
83


[
5] From these premises therefore ^ that in nature nothing happens
which does not follow from its laws, that its laws extend to all things con-
ceived by the divine understanding, and ¢nally that nature maintains a
¢xed and unchangeable order ^ it most evidently follows that the term
‘miracles’can be understood only with respect to human beliefs, and that it
signi¢es nothing other than a
84
phenomenon whose natural cause cannot be
explained on the pattern of some other familiar thing or at least cannot be
so explained by the narrator or reporter of the miracle.
I could in fact say that a miracle is something whose cause cannot
be explained from the principles of the natural things known to us by
the natural light of reason. But since miracles were produced according to
the capacity of the common people who were completely ignorant of the
principles of natural things, plainly the ancients took for a miracle what-
ever they were unable to explain in the manner the common people nor-
mally explained natural things, namely by seeking to recall something
similar which can be imagined without amazement. For the common
people suppose they have satisfactorily explained something as soon as it
no longer astounds them. Hence, for the ancients and the vast majority of
men down to our own time, this was the only criterion for de¢ning what
was miraculous. Clearly, many things are therefore related as miracles in
the Bible whose causes may readily be explained from the known causes of
natural things, as we have already suggested in chapter
2
above, when we
spoke of the incident of the sun’s standing still in the time of Joshua
2
and
its moving backwards in the time of Ahaz.
3
But we will consider these
passages at greater length below, when we discuss the interpretation of
miracles which I promised to deal with in this chapter.
[
6] (2) It is now time for me to pass to the second issue and show that
we cannot infer from miracles either the essence or the existence, or the
providence, of God, but on the contrary that these are far better inferred
from the ¢xed and immutable order of nature. To demonstrate this I
proceed as follows. Since the existence of God is not known of itself,
4
it
must necessarily be deduced from concepts whose truth is so ¢rm and
unquestionable that no power capable of changing them can exist, or be
conceived. At any rate they must appear so to us from the moment we
infer God’s existence from them, if we want to derive this from them
2
Joshua
10.
3
Isaiah
38:7^8.
4
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
6.
Theological-Political Treatise
84


without risk of doubt. For if we could conceive that the axioms them-
selves might be modi¢ed by whatever power then we could doubt their
truth, and hence also our conclusion concerning God’s existence, and
could never be certain about anything. Furthermore, we know nothing
conforms to nature or con£icts with it, except what we have shown to
agree or con£ict with those [evident] principles. Therefore if we could
conceive that anything in nature could be brought about by any power
(whatever power that might be) which
85
con£icts with nature, it would be
in con£ict with those primary principles and therefore would have to be
rejected as absurd, or else there would be doubts about those primary
principles (as we have just shown) and, consequently, about God and
about all our perceptions of whatever kind. It is far from true, therefore,
that miracles ^ in so far as the word is used for a phenomenon that
con£icts with the order of nature ^ prove for us the existence of God.
On the contrary, they would make us call into doubt that very point,
since, without them, we could be absolutely certain of it, because we
know that all things follow the certain and unchangeable order of nature.
[
7] But let it be supposed that a miracle is something that cannot be
explained by natural causes. This can be understood in two ways: either
it does indeed have natural causes though they cannot be discovered by
human understanding, or it admits no cause but God or the will of God.
But because all things that happen by natural causes also happen by the
sole power and will of God, we must necessarily conclude, ¢nally, that
whether a miracle has natural causes or not, it is a phenomenon that
cannot be explained by a cause, that is, it is a phenomenon that sur-
passes human understanding. But we can understand nothing of a phe-
nomenon, or of anything at all, that surpasses our understanding. For
whatever we understand clearly and distinctly, must become known to us
either by itself or by means of something else that is understood clearly
and distinctly. Therefore, we cannot understand from a miracle, or work
which surpasses our understanding, the essence of God or his existence,
or anything about God and nature.
On the contrary, since we know that all things are determined and
ordained by God, and that the operations of nature follow from the
essence of God, and the laws of nature are the eternal laws and volitions of
God, we must conclude, unconditionally, that we get a fuller knowledge of
God and God’s will as we acquire a fuller knowledge of natural things and
On miracles
85




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə