Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə48/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   114

I could not infer from principles revealed in Scripture. But here I have
drawn particular conclusions only from principles known by the natural
light of reason and done this deliberately. Since prophecy is beyond
human understanding and is a purely theological issue, I could not say or
know what it is in itself, as such, except on the basis of revealed princi-
ples. I was therefore obliged there to construct a history of prophecy and
to derive certain dogmas from it which would show me its nature and
characteristics, so far as that can be done. But with regard to miracles, the
question we are investigating (namely, whether we may concede that
something happens in nature which contradicts its laws or which does
not conform to them) is wholly philosophical. Therefore I did not need
a similar approach. I thought it more advisable to elucidate this ques-
tion from principles known by the natural light of reason since these
are the best known. I say that ‘I thought it more advisable’; for I could
also readily have dealt with it solely on the basis of biblical dogmas and
principles, and I will expand on this here in a few words, so that it will
be clear to everyone.
[
22] In some passages Scripture says of nature in general that it pre-
serves a ¢xed and immutable order, as in Psalm
148.6 and Jeremiah
31.35^6. Furthermore, the philosopher in his book of Ecclesiastes 1.10
very clearly explains that nothing new happens in nature; and in verses
11 and 12, in illustration of the same thing, he says that, although
sometimes something happens which appears to be new, it is actually not
new but occurred in past times of which there is no memory. For, as he
himself says, there is no remembrance of former things among those
who live today, nor will there be any memory of today’s a¡airs among
those who are to come. Then, at
3.11, he says that God has ordered all
things properly, in their time, and at verse
14 he says that he knows that
whatever God does endures for ever, nor can anything be added to it nor
anything taken away. All this evidently proves that nature maintains a
¢xed and immutable order, that God has been the same in all ages
known and unknown to us, and that the laws of nature are so perfect and
so fruitful that nothing can be added to or detracted from them, and
miracles only seem to be new owing to men’s ignorance. This, then, is
what is explicitly taught in Scripture; nowhere does it teach us that any-
thing happens in nature that contradicts
96
nature’s laws or cannot follow
from them; and we should not attribute any such doctrine to it.
On miracles
95


In addition, miracles require causes and circumstances (as we have
already shown).They do not follow from the kind of autocratic government
the common people ascribe to God but rather from divine decree and
government which (as we have also shown from Scripture itself ) signi¢es
the laws of nature and its order. Finally, miracles may also be performed by
impostors, as is proved from Deuteronomy
13 and Matthew 24.24.
It follows, further, and with the utmost clarity, that miracles were nat-
ural events and therefore must be explained so as not to seem ‘new’ (to use
Solomon’s word) or in con£ict with nature, but as close to natural realities
as possible; and I have given some rules derived from Scripture alone in
order that anyone should be capable of doing this fairly easily.
[
23] Although I say that Scripture teaches these things, however, I do
not mean that the Bible promotes them as doctrines necessary for sal-
vation, but only that the prophets embraced them just as we do. There-
fore it is up to every man to hold the opinion about them that he feels
best enables him to subscribe with all his mind to the cult and religion of
God. This is also the opinion of Josephus. Here is what he writes at the
end of book
2 of his Antiquities: ‘Let no one disbelieve this talk of a
miracle occurring among men of the distant past, innocent of evil as
they were, for whom a path to safety opened through the sea, whether
this happened by God’s will or of its own accord. For in more recent
times the Pamphylian sea divided for the troops of Alexander, king of
Macedon, and a¡orded them a passage through it when they had no
other way to go, since it was God’s will to destroy the Persian kingdom by
means of him. This is admitted by everyone who has written about the
deeds of Alexander; everyone therefore should think as he pleases about
these things’.
10
These are Josephus’ words and his judgement about
belief in miracles.
10
Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews,
2.347^8.We have rendered the Greek text of Josephus, since the
Latin translation used by Spinoza is unintelligible at one point (antiquitus a resistentibus). The
¢nal clause of the quotation is a phrase which Josephus uses several times when recounting an
extraordinary event.
Theological-Political Treatise
96


chapter 7
97
On the interpretation of Scripture
[
1] All men are ready to say that Holy Scripture is the word of God that
teaches us true happiness or the way of salvation, but their actions betray
a quite di¡erent opinion. For the common people, the last thing that
they appear to want is to live by the teaching of Scripture. We see them
advancing false notions of their own as the word of God and seeking to
use the in£uence of religion to compel other people to agree with them.
As for theologians, we see that for the most part they have sought to
extract their own thoughts and opinions from the Bible and thereby
endow them with divine authority. There is nothing that they interpret
with less hesitation and greater boldness than the Scriptures, that is the
mind of the Holy Spirit. If they hesitate at all, it is not because they are
afraid of ascribing error to the Holy Spirit or straying from the path of
salvation, but rather of being convicted of error by others and seeing
themselves despised and their authority trodden underfoot.
If people truly believed in their hearts what they say with their lips
about Scripture, they would follow a completely di¡erent way of life.
There would be fewer di¡erences of opinion occupying their minds,
fewer bitter controversies between them, and less blind and reckless
ambition to distort our interpretation of the Bible and devise novelties in
religion. On the contrary, they would not dare to accept anything as
biblical teaching which they had not derived from it in the clearest pos-
sible way. Sacrilegious persons, who have not been afraid to corrupt the
Scriptures in so many places, would have been careful to avoid commit-
ting such a dreadful o¡ence and kept their impious hands o¡ them. But
vice and ambition have in the end exercised so much in£uence that reli-
gion has been made to consist in defending purely human delusions
97




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə