Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə50/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   114

In order to know whether or not Moses believed that God is ¢re, we
certainly must not argue on the basis of whether this statement agrees or
con£icts with reason but only from other
101
statements made by Moses himself.
For example, since Moses also plainly teaches, in many passages, that God
has no similarity with visible things in the sky or on earth or in the water,
we must conclude that either this statement or all the others have to be
interpreted metaphorically. But we should depart as little as possible from
the literal sense, and therefore we must ¢rst ask whether this unique expres-
sion, ‘God is ¢re’, admits any but a literal sense, i.e., whether the word ‘¢re’
has any other meaning apart from natural ¢re. If we do not ¢nd it signifying
anything else in normal linguistic usage, that is how we must interpret the
expression, however much it may con£ict with reason. All the others, how-
ever much they agree with reason, will have to be accommodated to this
one. Where linguistic usage does not permit this, such statements are irre-
concilable, and hence we must suspend judgment about them. Now the
word ‘¢re’ also stands for anger and jealousy (see Job
31.12), and therefore
Moses’ statements are readily reconciled, and we are justi¢ed in concluding
that they are one and the same. Again, Moses plainly teaches that God is jea-
lous and nowhere teaches that God lacks emotions or mental passions. Hence,
we must evidently deduce that this is what Moses believed, or at least what he
wanted to teach, however much we may think this statement con£icts with rea-
son. For, as we have already shown, we are not permitted to adjust the meaning
of Scripture to the dictates of our reason or our preconceived opinions; all
explanation of the Bible must be sought from the Bible alone.
(
3) Finally our historical enquiry must explain the circumstances of all the
books of the prophets whose memory has come down to us: the life, character
and particular interests of the author of each individual book, who exactly he
was, on what occasion he wrote, for whom and in what language. Then the fate
of each book: namely how it was ¢rst received and whose hands it came into, how
many variant readings there have been of its text, by whose decision it was
received among the sacred books, and ¢nally how all the books which are now
accepted as sacred came to form a single corpus. All this, I contend, has to be
dealt with in a history of the Bible.
It is important to know of the life, character and concerns of each writer,
so that we may know which statements
102
are meant as laws and which as
moral doctrine; we are more readily able to explain someone’s words, the
better we know his mind and personality. It is also crucial to know on what
occasion, at what time and for what people or age the various texts were
written so that we may not confuse eternal doctrines with those that are
merely temporary or useful only to a few people. It is essential, ¢nally, to
On the interpretation of Scripture
101


know all the other things mentioned above, so that, apart from the ques-
tion of authorship, we may also discover, for each book, whether it may
have been contaminated with spurious passages or not; whether mistakes
have crept in, and whether the mistakes have been corrected by unskilled
or untrustworthy hands. It is vital to know all this, so that we will not be
carried away by blind zeal or just accept whatever is put in front of us. We
must acknowledge exclusively what is certain and unquestionable.
[
6] Only when we have this history of Scripture before us and have
made up our minds not to accept anything as a teaching of the prophets
which does not follow from this history or may be very clearly derived
from it, will it be time to begin investigating the minds of the prophets
and the Holy Spirit. But this also requires a method and an order like we
use for explaining nature on the basis of its history. In setting out to
research natural history, we attempt ¢rst of all to investigate the things
that are most universal and common to the whole of nature, viz. motion
and rest and their laws and rules which nature always observes and by
which it continually acts; from these we proceed by degrees to others
that are less universal. Similarly we must ¢rst seek from the biblical
history that which is most universal, the basis and foundation of the
whole of Scripture, something a⁄rmed by all the biblical prophets as
eternal doctrine of supreme value for all men: for example, that there is a
God, one and omnipotent, who alone is to be adored and cares for all
men, loving most those who worship Him and love their neighbour as
themselves, etc. These and similar things, I contend, Scripture teaches
so plainly and so explicitly throughout that no one has ever called its
meaning into question in these matters. But Scripture does not teach
expressly, as eternal doctrine, what God is, and how he sees all things and
provides for them, and so on.
103
On the contrary, as we have already seen
above, the prophets themselves have no agreed view about these matters,
so that on these questions nothing can regarded as the teaching of the Holy
Spirit, even if they can be decided very well by the natural light of reason.
[
7] Once we have adequately got to know this universal doctrine of
Scripture, we should then proceed to other less universal things which
concern matters of daily life, £owing like rivulets from the universal
teaching. Such are all the particular external actions of true virtue which
can only be done when the opportunity arises. Anything found in the
Theological-Political Treatise
102




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə