Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə51/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   ...   114

Scriptures about these things which is obscure and ambiguous, should be
explained and decided only by the Bible’s universal doctrine, and where
such passages are self-contradictory, we must consider on what occasion,
when, and to whom they were written.
When Christ says,‘blessed are those who mourn, for they shall receive
consolation’, for example, we do not know from the text what he means
by ‘those who mourn’. But later he teaches that we should be anxious
about nothing but the kingdom of God alone and its justice, and this is
what he commends as the supreme good (see Matthew
6.33). From this it
follows that by ‘those who mourn’ he means only those who mourn that
the kingdom of God and justice are neglected by men; for only those can
mourn this who love nothing but God’s kingdom and justice, and wholly
despise all fortune besides.
So too when he says,‘but to him who strikes you on your right cheek,
turn to him the other also’, etc. Had Christ given these commands to
judges as a legislator, he would have destroyed the Law of Moses by this
edict. But he openly commends that Law (see Matthew
5.17); conse-
quently, we must examine who it was exactly that said these things, to
whom and at what time. Certainly, it was Christ who uttered them, but he
was not laying down ordinances as a legislator. Rather he was o¡ering
doctrine as a teacher, because (as we showed above) it was less external
actions that he sought to correct than people’s minds. He pronounced
these words to people who were oppressed and living in a corrupt state
where justice was completely neglected, and he saw that the ruin of that
state was imminent.
This very doctrine that Christ taught at a time when the city’s deso-
lation was imminent, we see that Jeremiah had also expounded at the
time of the ¢rst destruction of the city (see Lamentations
3, letters Tet
and Yod
2
). Hence, the prophets o¡ered this teaching only at a time of
oppression, and it is nowhere promulgated
104
as a law. On the contrary,
Moses (who did not write at a time of oppression, but, it should be
noted, was striving to construct a well-ordered state) issued the edicts to
pay an eye for an eye, even though he too condemned vengeance and
hatred of one’s neighbour. Thus, it most evidently follows from the very
principles of Scripture itself, that the doctrine of su¡ering injury and
giving way to impious men in everything, is appropriate only in places
2
Lamentations
3.25^30.
On the interpretation of Scripture
103


where justice is neglected and in times of oppression, but not in a well-
ordered state. Indeed in a viable state, where justice is protected, every-
one is obliged, if he wants to be considered just, to prosecute wrongs
before a court (see Leviticus
5.1), not so as to secure revenge (see
Leviticus
19.17^18) but to defend justice and his country’s laws and to
ensure that wrongdoing does not pay. All of this fully accords with
natural reason. I could give many other examples pointing in the same
direction, but consider these su⁄cient to explicate my meaning and the
usefulness of this method, which is what concerns me at present.
[
8] So far we have explained only how to explore the meaning of biblical
statements about questions of daily life. These are issues which are rela-
tively easy to investigate since none of this was ever a subject of controversy
for biblical writers. But other matters to be found in the Bible concerning
purely philosophical questions, cannot be so easily resolved. The path to
be followed here is thus more arduous. As we have already seen, the pro-
phets disagreed among themselves in philosophical matters, and their
narratives of things are very much adapted to the presuppositions of their
respective times, and therefore we may not infer or explain the meaning of
one prophet from clearer passages in another, unless it is absolutely evi-
dent that they both held exactly the same opinion. I will therefore now
brie£y explain how the mind of the prophets in such matters is to be
investigated by an enquiry into Scripture.
Here too we must again begin from the most universal things, by
inquiring ¢rst of all, from the clearest scriptural expressions, what pro-
phecy or revelation is, and what it chie£y consists in. Then we must ask
what a miracle is, and continue thus with the most general questions.
From these we must descend to the opinions of each individual prophet,
and from these in turn proceed ¢nally to the sense of each particular
revelation or prophecy, of each
105
narrative and miracle. We have given
many examples above, in the appropriate places, showing how much care
is needed not to confuse the minds of the prophets and historians with
the mind of the Holy Spirit, so I do not think I need to discuss this at
greater length. I should remark, however, with regard to the meaning of
revelations, that our method only teaches us to investigate what the
prophets actually saw or heard, not what they intended to signify or
represent by these visions; that we can only conjecture, since we certainly
cannot deduce it from the principles of Scripture.
Theological-Political Treatise
104


[
9 ] We h ave o¡e re d a m e t h o d fo r i n te r p re t i ng S c r iptu re a n d a t t h e s a me
t i me de m onstrate d that thi s is the m o st c e r t ain and o nly way to u n c ove r
its tr ue me aning. I g ran t that ce r t ain ty ab out t his la st is e a s i e r to ¢nd for
tho s e , if they exi st , wh o p o s s e s s a s ol id tradit i on or a t r ue exe ge s is
inhe r ite d fro m the prophe ts the ms elves , such a s the Phar is e e s c lai m to
have , or t ho s e who p o s s e s s a Pop e who c an not e r r i n t he i n te r pre t a t i o n of
s c r iptu re , a s Ro m a n C a t h ol i c s p ro c l ai m. Sin c e , h oweve r, we c a n n o t b e
c e r t ai n e i t h e r ab o ut t h a t t ra dit i o n o r p ap al aut h o r i ty, n o t h i ng c e r t ai n c a n
b e g ro u n de d o n e i t h e r of t h e s e. Th e l a tte r wa s de n i e d by t h e e a rl i e s t
C h r i s t i a n s a n d t h e fo r me r by t h e m o s t a n c i e n t Jewi s h s e ct s ; fu r t h e r, if
we the n ex amin e the chro nolo gy (apar t fro m a ny o the r arg u me n ts)
wh i c h t h e Ph a r i s e e s i nh e r i te d f ro m t h e i r rabb i s by wh i c h t h ey t ra c e
t h i s t ra dit i o n b a c k to Mo s e s , we s h al l ¢ n d t h a t i t i s fal s e , a s I s h ow i n
anothe r pla ce.
3
This is why such a tradit ion should b e alto ge the r susp e ct to us. And
although we are o blige d, by ou r me tho d, to c ons ide r on e Jewish tradit ion
a s u nc or r upt , namely the me aning of words in the Heb rew language we
have rece ive d from the m, we c an st ill fairly have doubts ab out the for me r
tradit ion while accepting the latte r. For it c ould n eve r have b e e n of any us e
to change a word’s me aning, but it migh t quite ofte n have b e e n us eful to
s o me on e to alte r the me aning of a pa s s age. In fact it is extremely di⁄cult to
alte r the me aning of a word ; anyon e who tr i e d it would have at the s ame
t i me to in te r pre t in his ow n way and mann e r all the authors who have
w r itte n in that language us ing that te r m in its accepte d s e ns e , or els e with
the greatest wariness corrupt the text. Again, the learned share with the
common people in preserving a language, but the learned alone preserve
books and the meanings of texts. Accordingly, we can easily conceive that
the learned could have altered or perverted
106
the sense of a passage in a very
rare book which they had under their control, but not the signi¢cance of
words. Anyone who attempts to change the meaning of a word to which he
is accustomed will have great di⁄culty in afterwards sticking consistently
to the change in his speech and writing.We are thus wholly convinced, for
these and other reasons, that it could never have entered into anyone’s
head to corrupt a language but might certainly occur to someone to mis-
represent the meaning of a writer by doctoring his texts or interpreting
them wrongly.
3
S e e ch apte r 
10
 para. 17 b el ow. pp. 153^4 .
On the interpretation of Scripture
105




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə