Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə53/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   114

pass this over for the present, and proceed to make some further remarks
about the di⁄culties and limitations of this the true method of interpret-
ing Scripture.
[
15] A further problem with this method is that it requires a history of
the vicissitudes of all the biblical books, and most of this is unknown to us.
For either we have no knowledge whatever of the authors, or (if you prefer)
the compilers, of many of the books ^ or else we are uncertain about them,
as I will demonstrate fully in the next chapters. Also, we do not know under
what circumstances these books whose compilers are unknown were
composed or when. Nor do we know into whose hands all these books
subsequently came, or in whose copies so many variant readings occur, nor
whether there may not have been many additional readings in others. I
touched upon the need to know all this at one point but purposely omitted
a few things which we should deal with now. If we read any book that con-
tains incredible or incomprehensible things, or is written in very obscure
language, and if we do not know its author or when and under what cir-
cumstances he wrote it, our e¡orts to get at its true sense will be fruitless.
For if all this is unknown, we cannot ascertain what the author intended or
might have intended. When, on the other
110
hand, all these things are ade-
quately known, we determine our thoughts so as not to make prejudicial
judgments or attribute to the author, or person on whose behalf he wrote,
either more or less than is correct, or take anything else into consideration
but what the author could have had in mind, or what the period and con-
text demanded.
This I think will be clear to everyone. It frequently happens that we read
very similar stories in di¡erent books, about which we make quite con-
trasting judgments, depending on the di¡erent views we have of the wri-
ters. I remember once reading in a certain book that a man whose name was
Orlando Furioso
6
was wont to drive a winged monster through the air and
£y over any regions he wished, single-handedly killing large numbers of
men and giants, and other fantasies of this kind, which are totally incom-
prehensible to our intellect. I have read a similar story in Ovid about
Perseus,
7
and another in the books of Judges and Kings
8
about Samson
(who alone and unarmed killed a thousand men) and Elijah,
9
who £ew
6
Ariosto, Orlando Furioso
10.66.
7
Ovid, Metamorphoses
4.600¡.
8
Judges
15.9^16.
9
2 Kings 2.11.
On the interpretation of Scripture
109


through the air and ¢nally went o¡ to heaven in a ¢ery chariot and horses.
Yet although these stories, as I say, are very much alike, we nevertheless
make a very di¡erent judgment about each of them.We persuade ourselves
that the ¢rst writer intended to write only fables, the second poetical
themes,
10
and the third sacred matters, and the only reason for such
[di¡erentiation] is the opinion we have about the writers. Thus it is vitally
important to have some knowledge of the authors who have written things
which are obscure or incomprehensible to the intellect, if we want to
interpret their writings. For the same reasons, it is likewise vital, if we are
to be able, when a passage is unintelligible, to reach a true reading from all
the variants, to know in whose copy these readings were found and whether
other readings have ever been encountered in the copies of other scribes of
greater authority.
[
16] Another and ¢nal di⁄culty in interpreting some biblical books by
our method is that we do not now have them in the same language in which
they were originally written. The Gospel of Matthew and without doubt
also the Letter to the Hebrews are commonly believed to have been
composed in Hebrew, but these versions are not extant. There is also
some doubt in what language the book of Job was written. Ibn Ezra
11
asserts in his commentary that
111
it was translated into Hebrew from
another language and that this is the cause of its obscurity. I will not
discuss the apocryphal books, since they are of very di¡erent authority.
[
17] All these, then, are the di⁄culties of this method of interpreting
Scripture on the basis of its own history which I undertook to describe. I
think these di⁄culties are so great that I do not hesitate to a⁄rm that in
numerous passages either we do not know the true sense of Scripture or
can only guess at it without any assurance. However, we must also stress
that all these problems can only prevent our understanding the minds of
the prophets in matters that are incomprehensible and which we can only
imagine, and not those topics that are accessible to the intellect and of
which we can readily form a clear conception.
12
For matters that by their
nature are easily grasped can never be so obscurely phrased that they
cannot be readily understood, according to the saying, a word is enough for
10
Accepting the emendation ‘res poeticas’ for ‘res politicas’.
11
Ibn Ezra, Commentary on Job,
2.11.
12
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
8.
Theological-Political Treatise
110


a wise man.
13
Euclid, who wrote nothing that was not eminently straight-
forward and highly intelligible, is easily explained by anyone in any lan-
guage. In order to see his meaning and be certain of his sense there is no
need to have a complete knowledge of the language in which he wrote, but
only a very modest, even schoolboy, acquaintance with it, nor does one
need to know the life, interests and character of the author, nor in what
language he wrote, to whom and when, nor the subsequent fate of his book
or its variant readings, nor how or by what Council it was authorized.
What is true of Euclid we may also say about all who have written about
things that are intelligible via their own nature. We thus conclude that we
can readily discover the meaning of the Bible’s moral teaching from the
history of it that we are able to reconstruct, and can be certain about its
true sense. For the teachings of true piety are expressed in the most
everyday language, since they are very common and extremely simple and
easy to understand. And since true salvation and happiness consists in our
intellect’s genuine acquiescence [in what is true] and we truly acquiesce
only in what we understand very clearly, it most evidently follows that we
can securely grasp the meaning of Scripture in matters necessary for sal-
vation and happiness. Consequently, there is no reason why we should be
concerned to the same extent about the rest, given that for the most part
we are unable to grasp it by reason or the intellect and it is therefore
something more curious
112
than useful.
[
18] I have now explained, I think, the true method for interpreting
Scripture, and su⁄ciently expounded my view of it. Moreover, I do not
doubt that everyone now sees that this method requires no other light than
that of natural reason. For the special character and excellence of this light
chie£y consists in deducing and concluding by valid inferences from
things known or accepted as known, matters that are imperfectly under-
stood and this is all that our method requires. Admittedly, this procedure
does not su⁄ce to achieve certainty about everything in the biblical books,
but this is due not to any defect in our methodology but because the path it
shows to be the true and right one was never cultivated, or even ventured
on, by men, so that owing to the passage of time, it became arduous and
almost impassable, as is eminently clear, I think, from the di⁄culties that
I have pointed out.
13
Terence, Phormio
541, Plautus, Persa 729.
On the interpretation of Scripture
111




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə