Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə64/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   ...   114

appears penned correctly following the general rule. Did this too occur
because the hand slipped in writing it? By what stroke of fate could it
happen that the pen was always in too much of a hurry whenever this word
cropped up? They could easily and without scruple have completed the
word and made the correction according to the rules of grammar. Since
these readings are not co-incidental and such obvious faults were not
amended, they hold that they were deliberately made by the earliest writers
to convey something of special signi¢cance.
[
17] These arguments are easily answered. I am not going to spend time
on the argument from the customary way of reading which they have
adopted. Superstition may have had some in£uence, and perhaps that was
the origin of it, because they judged both readings to be equally good or
tolerable, and lest either of them be lost, they wanted one to be written and
the other to be read. Being unsure, they were evidently afraid to exercise
their judgement in so important a matter, in case they chose the false
reading instead of the true one. They aimed to avoid giving preference to
either one, which they would certainly have done had they ordered that
only one be read out, especially as marginal notes are not written in the
sacred scrolls. Or perhaps it derived from the fact that they wanted certain
things, although correctly written, to be read out di¡erently, following
instructions in the margin. Hence they made it a general custom to read
the Bible in accordance with the marginal notes.
[
18] I will now explain why the scribes were moved to note in the margin
certain things that were to be read out. Not all marginal notes are doubtful
readings; they also made a note about things that were foreign to everyday
usage, for example obsolete words, and words that the current sense of
propriety did not permit to be read in a public gathering. The ancient wri-
ters, without any sense of wrongdoing, called things by their proper names
and did not resort to polite euphemisms. But after vice and debauchery
established their reign, things that the
138
ancients uttered without obscenity,
came to be thought obscene.This was not a su⁄cient reason to alter Scrip-
ture; but in order to humour the sensibility of the common people, they
took to ensuring that decent versions of the terms for sexual intercourse and
excrement were read out in public, as they had noted them in the margin.
In any case, whatever the reason why it became customary to read and
interpret Scripture according to the marginal readings, it was not because
Further queries
139


the correct interpretation had to be in accord with them. For besides
the fact that in the Talmud itself the Rabbis often di¡ered from the
Masoretes
20
and approved di¡erent readings, as I shall show in a
moment, some of the material found in the margins does not appear to
be linguistically correct. For example, in
2 Samuel 14.23 it is written,
‘because the King has granted the request of his servant’, a construction
that is perfectly regular and agrees with that in verse
16 of the same
chapter. But the marginal reading (‘of your servant’) does not agree [as it
should] with the person of the verb. So too in the ¢nal verse of chapter
16
of the same book there is written,‘as when one consults’ (i.e.,‘there is a con-
sultation of ’) ‘the word of God’, where the marginal note adds,‘anyone’as the
subject of the verb. This does not seem to be quite right, for the
regular construction is to put impersonal verbs in the third person singular
active, as grammarians know very well. There are several marginal annota-
tions of this sort which are in no way preferable to what is in the text itself.
[
19] As for the Pharisees’ second argument, one can also readily reply to
that from what we have just said, namely, that the scribes annotated obso-
lete words as well as doubtful readings. In Hebrew, unquestionably, as in
other languages, subsequent developments rendered many words obsolete
and antiquated. Many such are found in the Bible, and the most recent
scribes, as we said, noted each of them, so that they would be read before
the people in accordance with the accepted usage of the time. This is the
reason why na’ar [‘boy’] is noted on every occasion, because in old times it
was of common gender and meant the same as juvenis [‘young person’] in
Latin. Likewise, the capital city of the Hebrews was normally called Jerusalem
and not Jerusalaim. I take the same view of the pronouns ‘he’ and ‘she’: more
recent writers changed the vav into ’yad (a frequent change in Hebrew)
when they wanted to indicate the
139
feminine gender; but ancient writers dis-
tinguished the feminine of this pronoun from the masculine by the vowels
alone. Equally, the irregular forms of certain verbs were di¡erent in earlier
than in later writers, and, lastly, the ancients possessed the remarkably neat
device of the paragogic letters he, aleph, mem, nun, tav, yod, and vav.
21
I could
20
Although the names of a few of the Masoretes are known, the vast system of marginal notes and
(divergent) methods of vocalization, punctuation and accentuation, collectively called the Masorah
in Hebrew, remain essentially anonymous. The Masoretes were active from the end of the fourth
down to the eleventh century ce.
21
Su⁄xed letters or syllables to lend added emphasis or modify meaning.
Theological-Political Treatise
140


illustrate all this here with numerous examples, but I do not want to annoy
the reader with tedious reading. If anyone asks how I know these things,
I reply that they are found in the most ancient writers, i.e., in the Bible,
but later writers did not choose to imitate them, and imitation is the only
reason why in other languages, even in dead languages, obsolete words can
remain still known.
[
20] Since I have said that the majority of these marginal notes are
doubtful readings, someone will perhaps ask next why there are never
more than two readings found for each passage? Why not sometimes three
or more? Again, certain expressions in the Scriptures which are correctly
annotated in the marginal note, are so obviously contrary to grammar, that
it is barely credible scribes could have hesitated or been in doubt which
reading was correct. Here too the reply is readily given. To the ¢rst ques-
tion, I answer that there were once more readings than the ones we ¢nd
annotated in our codices. Several readings are noted in theTalmud which
were neglected by the Masoretes, and in many passages they are so mani-
festly divergent that the superstitious editor of the Bomberg Bible
22
was
¢nally compelled to admit in his preface that he did not know how to
reconcile them: ‘Here we do not know what answer to give,’ he says,‘except
to repeat what we said earlier’, namely, that ‘it is the habit of theTalmud to
contradict the Masoretes’. Hence there is no justi¢cation for claiming there
have never been more than two readings for each passage.
Even so, I readily concede, in fact believe, that no more than two read-
ings were found for each passage and for two reasons:
(
1) because the reasonwe o¡ered for the survival ofvariant readings does not
permit more than two: for we showed that, usually, these arose from the similar-
ity between certain letters. The issue in the end thus nearly always came back to
which of two letters one was to append ^ bet or kaf ? jod or vav? dalet or resh? and
so on. These are the most frequently used
140
letters, and therefore it could often
occur that both yield a tolerable sense. Equally, the question was often whether
a syllable was long or short, where length is determined by the letters we have
called ‘silent’. Further, not all the annotations concern doubtful readings: as we
said, many were included for the sake of decency, and to explain obsolete and
antiquated words.
22
The standard second edition of the Bomberg Bible was published by Daniel Bomberg at Venice in
1524^5, edited by Jacob ben Hayyim.
Further queries
141




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə