Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə69/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   ...   114

several divergent epistles of genealogy for each man, and in copying from
them, followed the majority version, but when the number of discrepant
genealogies was equal on either side, then he copied out both versions’.
He thus concedes without reservation that these books were compiled
from originals which had not been adequately corrected or were less than
altogether certain. Furthermore, the commentators themselves, when
attempting to reconcile passages, very often do nothing but reveal how
these errors arise. In any case, I do not think that anyone with a sound
judgment believes that the sacred chroniclers had the deliberate intention
of writing in such a way that they would be seen as continually contra-
dicting themselves.
[
16] Possibly someone will say that I am completely undermining
Scripture by my manner of proceeding, since it may lead everyone to sus-
pect that the Bible is everywhere full of mistakes. But, on the contrary,
I have shown that my methodology works in favour of Scripture by pre-
venting passages which are clear and pure from being corrupted to ¢t
defective passages and simply because some passages are defective, we are
not justi¢ed in placing every passage under suspicion. There has never
ever been a book without mistakes: has anyone (I ask) therefore ever sup-
posed that they were defective throughout? Of course not, especially when
the expression is lucid and the meaning of the author is clearly evident.
[
17] This completes what I wanted to say about the history of the books
of the Old Testament. Our conclusion
150
is evident: no canon of sacred books
ever existed before the time of the Maccabees.
18
The books we now possess
were selected, in preference to many others, by the Second Temple Pharisees
who also set out the forms for prayers, and these have been accepted purely
as a consequence of their decisions. Hence, those who seek to demonstrate
the authority of Holy Scripture must prove the authority of each individual
book. It is insu⁄cient to demonstrate the divine character of just one book,
if one wishes to prove the divinity of all. Otherwise we would be obliged to
suppose that the council of the Pharisees could not have erred in their
selection of books, and no one will ever demonstrate that.
The reason driving me to assert it was the Pharisees alone who selected
the books of the Old Testament, placing them in the canon of sacred
18
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
25.
Remaining Old Testament books
153


b o oks , is that Dani el 
12.2 a⁄r ms the re su r re ction of the dead which the
Sadduce e s deni e d. Equally, the Phar is e e s the ms elve s plainly tell us a s
much in the Talmud. For in the treat is e Sa b b a t h (c h . 
2
 , folio 30 , p. 2)
‘Rabbi Jehuda , sp e aking in the name of Rab, s aid: the le ar n e d s ough t to
suppres s the b o ok of Eccle s ia ste s , b e c aus e its words are not c ons iste n t
with the words of the Law’ (n.b., the b o ok of the Law of Mo s e s). ‘But why
did they not withdraw it ? Be c aus e it b e g ins with the Law and e nds with
the Law’. Sligh tly fu r the r on he adds , ‘and they als o s ough t to suppre s s
the b o ok of Prove rbs’, e tc. Finally (in ch. 
1
, folio 
13 , p. 2 of the s ame
treatise) he remarks: ‘Remember that man for his generous spirit, whose
name was Neghunja, the son of Hiskia; for without him the book of
Ezekiel would have been discarded, because its words contradicted the
words of the Law’, etc. It very clearly follows from this that the learned in
the Law called together a council to determine what kind of books
should be received as sacred and which should be excluded. Hence,
anyone desirous of being sure about the authority of them all, must go
through the entire deliberative process afresh seeking justi¢cation for
each of them.
[
18] Now it should be time likewise to examine in the same manner
the books of the New Testament. However, I am well aware that this has
already been done by men expert in the relevant ¢elds of knowledge and
especially the [requisite] languages whereas I myself do not have so
accurate a knowledge of Greek that I would dare to enter this ¢eld; on
top of which we lack the originals of
151
the books originally composed in
Hebrew. For all these reasons I prefer not to undertake this task, though I
do want to note the things most relevant to my design and I shall do this
in the following chapter.
Theological-Political Treatise
154


chapter 11
Where it is asked whether the Apostles wrote their
Epistles as apostles and prophets or as teachers, and
the role of an Apostle is explained
[
1] No one who peruses the NewTestament can doubt that the Apostles
were prophets. However, as we showed at the close of chapter
1
, prophets
did not always speak on the basis of revelation; indeed, they rarely did so.
Hence, we may wonder whether the Apostles composed their Epistles as
prophets on the basis of revelation, and by explicit command, like Moses
and Jeremiah, and so on, or whether they wrote them as private individuals
or teachers. This is open to question especially since Paul mentions in his
First Epistle to the Corinthians
14.6. that there are two di¡erent forms of
discourse, one based upon revelation and the other upon knowledge. This
is why, I maintain, one needs to enquire whether in their Epistles the
Apostles are prophesying or teaching.
The style of the Epistles, if we are ready to study it, we shall ¢nd to be very
di¡erent from the style of prophecy. Whenever the prophets testi¢ed, they
invariably declared that they were speaking at the command of God: ‘Thus
says God’,‘the God of hosts says’,‘the word of God’, etc. This was apparently
their style not only in their public proclamations, but also in those of their
letters that contain revelations, as in that of Elijah to Jehoram (see
2
Chronicles
21.12), which begins,‘Thus says God’.We ¢nd nothing compar-
able in the Apostles’ letters; on the contrary, at
1 Corinthians7.40 Paul speaks
according to his own opinion. Actually, ambiguous meanings and tentative
expressions are found in many passages as, for example,‘we therefore think’
1
1
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
26.
155




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə