Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə7/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   114

doctrine.‘As soon as this abuse began in the church’, explains Spinoza in
the preface of the Theological-Political Treatise, ‘the worst kind of people
came forward to ¢ll the sacred o⁄ces and the impulse to spread God’s
religion degenerated into sordid greed and ambition.’
20
To make their
‘mysteries’ appear more impressive intellectually, theologians also utilized
the ‘the speculations of the Aristotelians or Platonists’; and as ‘they did not
wish to appear to be following pagans, they adapted the scriptures to
them’.
21
In this way, faith has become identical, holds Spinoza, ‘with
credulity and prejudices’ and ‘piety and religion are reduced to ridiculous
mysteries and those who totally condemn reason and reject and revile the
understanding as corrupt by nature, are believed without a doubt to
possess the divine light, which is the most iniquitous aspect of all.’
22
In
their subsequent debased condition, lacking moral and intellectual status,
the religions of the Christians, Jews, Muslims and pagans, he argues, have
long really all been equivalent, that is all equally adulterated and lacking in
genuine authority.
Far from being, as some maintained at the time, a confused idea of
deities or the Deity, ‘superstition’, contends Spinoza, proceeds from
emotional frenzy, especially dread and foreboding, and like other forms of
emotional disturbance assumes very varied and unstable forms. But no
matter how unstable (and destabilizing) ‘superstition’ can be, wherever the
multitude is ruled by it more than by anything else, it remains a constant
means of accumulating power for the crafty and ambitious, especially
those who know how to channel it e¡ectively by dressing it up in pompous
and impressive ceremonies, dogmas and great mysteries (as well as
impenetrable Platonic philosophy), all of which serve to extend and
reinforce its reach, rendering popular ‘superstition’ the overriding danger
to those who are independent-minded or who dissent from theological
dogmas and what the majority thinks.
Spinoza’s theory of toleration
One of the key features of the Theological-Political Treatise is the theory of
toleration that it so powerfully formulates and its general defence of
freedom of expression and publication. Spinoza, Bayle and Locke are
undoubtedly the three pre-eminent philosophical champions of toleration
20
Ibid., para.
9.
21
Ibid., para.
9.
22
Ibid., para.
9.
xxi
Introduction


of the Early Enlightenment era. But of these three great and distinct
toleration theories, Spinoza’s is unquestionably not just the earliest but
also the most sweeping, and is arguably also historically the most
important ^ especially from the perspective of ‘modernity’ conceived as a
package of egalitarian and democratic values ^ even though in the Anglo-
American intellectual tradition it is customary to stress the role of Locke
much more than that of Spinoza. Radical Enlightenment thinkers such as
Diderot, d’Alembert, d’Holbach and Helve
´ tius, in any case, were plainly
much closer to Spinoza’s conception of toleration than they were to
Locke’s, whose theory depends in large part on theological premises and
which emphatically excludes ‘atheists’ and therefore also materialists and
to a lesser degree agnostics, Catholics, Muslims, Jews and the Confucians
whom Bayle, Malebranche and many other Early Enlightenment authors
classi¢ed as the ‘Spinozists’ of the East.
It was one of Spinoza’s chief aims in the Theological-Political Treatise to
demonstrate that ‘not only may this liberty be granted without risk to the
peace of the republic and to piety as well as the authority of the sovereign
power, but also that to conserve all of this such freedom must be granted’.
23
At the same time, liberty of worship, conceived as an ingredient separate
from freedom of thought, always remained marginal in Spinoza’s theory of
toleration, so much so that in contrast to Locke, for whom religious
freedom remained always the foremost aspect of toleration, Spinoza
scarcely discusses it in the Theological-Political Treatise at all, despite this
being the work where he chie£y expounds his theory of individual freedom
and toleration. He does, though, say more about religious freedom, later,
in his un¢nished Tractatus Politicus [Political Treatise] (
1677).This unusual
and at ¢rst sight surprising emphasis derives from Spinoza’s tendency
to conceive liberty of conscience and worship as something strictly
subordinate in importance to freedom of thought and not as something of
itself fundamental to the making of a good society and establishing the
good life. He therefore treats religious freedom as an element necessarily
comprised within, but yet strictly subsidiary to, toleration conceived in
terms of liberty of thought and expression.
24
But while encompassing freedom of worship in his toleration, Spinoza
in both theTheological-Political Treatise and the laterTractatus Politicus shows
23
Ibid., ch.
20
, para.
16.
24
Benedict de Spinoza, The Political Works (ed.) A. G.Wernham (Oxford,
1958), pp. 410^11.
xxii
Introduction


a marked reluctance to encourage organised ecclesiastical structures to
expand their in£uence, compete for followers, assert their spiritual
authority over individuals, or engage in politics, in the way that Locke’s
theory actively encourages churches to do. For Spinoza was acutely aware
that such latitude can have deeply ambivalent results with regard to
individual freedom and liberty of expression. In fact, he carefully
distinguishes between toleration of individual worship, which he sees as
one thing, and empowering churches to organize, expand and extend their
authority freely, just as they wish, which he sees as something rather
di¡erent.While entirely granting that everyone must possess the freedom
to express their beliefs no matter what faith or ideas they profess, he
simultaneously urges the need for certain restrictions on the pretensions
and activities of churches, a line subsequently carried further by Diderot.
While dissenters should enjoy the right to build as many churches as they
want and individuals should freely ful¢l the duties of their faith as they
understand them, Spinoza does not agree that minority religions should,
therefore, be given a wholly free hand to acquire large and impressive
ecclesiastical buildings and still less to exercise a near unrestricted sway
over their members, as the Amsterdam Portuguese synagogue had once
sought to dictate to him.
Still more urgent, in his view, was the need to keep the majority or state
church under ¢rm secular control: ‘in a free republic (respublica)’, he argues,
‘nothing that can be devised or attempted will be less successful’ than to
render the o⁄cial religion powerful enough to regulate, and consider itself
justi¢ed in seeking to control, the views and expressions of opinion of
individuals.‘For it is completely contrary to the common liberty to shackle
the free judgment of the individual with prejudices or constraints of any
kind.’
25
O⁄cially condoned persecution justi¢ed by the alleged need to
enforce religious truth is an oppressive intrusion of the law into the private
sphere and arises only because ‘laws are enacted about doctrinal matters,
and beliefs are subjected to prosecution and condemnation as if they were
crimes, and those who support and subscribe to these condemned beliefs
are sacri¢ced not for the common welfare but to the hatred and cruelty of
their enemies’.
26
Consequently, holds Spinoza, the state should only punish men for
deeds and never for their utterances or opinions. The publicly established
25
Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, preface, para.
7.
26
Ibid., para.
7.
xxiii
Introduction




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə