Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə72/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   ...   114

impossible for the Apostles to accomplish, because the Gospel was
unknown to people at that time and hence, to avoid o¡ending them too
much with the novelty of its teaching, they adapted it, so far as they could,
to the minds of their contemporaries (see the First Epistle to the
Corinthians
9.19^20), and built upon the basic principles that were most
familiar and acceptable at the time. That is why none of the Apostles
engaged with philosophy more than Paul who was summoned to preach to
the gentiles while the others, who preached to the Jews, the despisers of
philosophy, likewise adapted themselves to their minds (see the Epistle to
the Galatians
2.11 etc.), and taught a religion devoid of philosophical the-
ory. How happy our own age would surely be, were we to see it also free
from all superstition.
3
3
I.e. via total separation of theology and philosophy.
Theological-Political Treatise
162


chapter 12
On the true original text of the divine law, and why Holy
Scripture is so called, and why it is called the word
of God, and a demonstration that, in so far as it
contains the word of God, it has come down
to us uncorrupted
[
1] Those who consider the Bible in its current state a letter from God,
sent from heaven to men, will undoubtedly protest that I have sinned
‘against the Holy Ghost’
1
by claiming the word of God is erroneous,
mutilated, corrupt and inconsistent, that we have only fragments of it, and
that the original text of the covenant which God made with the Jews has
perished. However, if they re£ect upon the facts, I have no doubt that they
will soon cease to protest. For both reason and the beliefs of the prophets
and Apostles evidently proclaim that God’s eternal word and covenant and
true religion are divinely inscribed upon the hearts of men, that is, upon the
human mind. This is God’s true original text, which he himself has sealed
with his own seal, that is, with the idea of himself as the image of his divinity.
[
2] To the early Jews, religionwas
159
handed down in writing as law, evidently
because in those times they were looked on as if they were infants. Later,
however, Moses (Deuteronomy
30.6) and Jeremiah (31.33) proclaimed to
them that a time would come when God would inscribe his law in their
hearts. It was therefore appropriate for the Jews alone, and especially for the
Sadducees, in their time, to ¢ght for the law written upon tablets, but it is
not at all appropriate for those who have the law inscribed on their minds.
1
Cp. Matthew
12.31, Mark 3.29, Luke 12.10.
163


Anyone willing to re£ect on this, will ¢nd nothing in what I have said
that is in con£ict with God’s word, or with true religion and faith, or any-
thing that can lessen its authority; for, on the contrary, we are enhancing
it, as we showed at the end of chapter
10
. If this were not so, I would have
resolved to remain silent about these topics. I would even ^ so as to avoid
all di⁄culties ^ have gladly agreed that profound mysteries lie hidden
in the Scriptures. However, since this belief has produced intolerable
superstition and other disastrous consequences which I reviewed at the
beginning of chapter
7
, I realized that I simply could not ignore them,
especially as religion requires no superstitious embellishment but, on the
contrary, it loses all its splendour when it is adorned with these ¢ctions.
[
3] But they [i.e. my adversaries] will insist that, even though the divine
law is written on our hearts, the Bible is still the word of God, and therefore
we may not say that it is mutilated and corrupt any more than we may say
this of the word of God.Truly, though, I fear that they, on the contrary, try
too hard to be pious.They are converting religion into superstition, indeed
verge, unfortunately, on adoring images and pictures, i.e. paper and ink,
as the word of God. I know I have said nothing unworthy of Scripture or of
the word of God, since I have said nothing that I have not demonstrated to
be true by the clearest reasoning. That is why I can also assert with con-
¢dence that I have said nothing that is irreligious or that smacks of impi-
ety. I admit that some impious persons who ¢nd religion a burden, may
discern an excuse for wrongdoing here and may infer, without any justi¢-
cation but merely to indulge their pleasures, that Scripture is thoroughly
£awed and corrupted and consequently lacks authority. One can do noth-
ing to help such people. It is a commonplace that nothing can be so well
formulated that it cannot be perverted by wrong interpretation. Anyone
who aspires to indulge in pleasures will readily ¢nd a pretext. Nor were
those who in ancient times possessed the original texts themselves and the
ark of the covenant, and indeed
160
the prophets and the Apostles, any better
or more obedient. All men alike, both Jews and gentiles, have always been
the same, and in every age virtue has been very rare.
[
4] However, to remove every scruple, I must show on what grounds
Scripture, or any inarticulate object, could be called sacred and divine.
After that, I must prove what the word of God really is and that it is not
contained in a certain number of books. Finally I must demonstrate that,
Theological-Political Treatise
164


in so far as the Bible teaches what is requisite for obedience and salvation, it
could not have been corrupted. Everyone will readily be able to see from
this that we have said nothing against God’s word, nor given any licence to
impiety.
[
5] Something intended to promote the practice of piety and religion is
called sacred and divine and is sacred only so long as people use it reli-
giously. If they cease to be pious, the thing in question likewise, at the
same time, ceases to be sacred. If they devote that thing to impious
purposes, the very object that before was sacred will be rendered unclean
and profane. For example, a certain place was called by the patriarch
Jacob ‘the house of God’, because there he worshipped the God that had
been revealed to him. But the very same place was called ‘the house of
iniquity’ by the prophets (see Amos
5.5 and Hosea 10.5), because in their
time, following the practice of Jeroboam, the Israelites were accustomed
to sacri¢ce to idols there.
Here is another example that brings all this out very clearly. Words
acquire a particular meaning simply from their usage. Words deployed in
accordance with this usage in such a way that, on reading them, people are
moved to devotion will be sacred words, and any book written with words
so used will also be sacred. But if that usage later dies out so that the words
lose their earlier meaning, or if the book becomes wholly neglected, whe-
ther from wickedness or because people no longer need it, then both words
and bookwill then likewise have neither use nor sanctity. Lastly, if the same
words are di¡erently deployed or it becomes accepted usage to construe
the [same] words in the contrary sense, then both words and book which
were formerly sacred will become profane and impure. From this it follows
that nothing is sacred, profane, or impure, absolutely and independently of
the mind but only in relation to the mind.
[
6] This is entirely evident from many passages of Scripture. Jeremiah 7.4
(to take an example at random) holds the Jews of his time to be wrong in
calling Solomon’s temple the temple of
161
God, for, as he goes on to say, in the
same chapter, God’s name could only be present in that temple as long as it
was frequented by men who worshipped him and defended justice. But
once frequented by murderers, thieves, idolaters and other wrongdoers
instead, it was then rather a den of sinners. I have often wondered why it is
that Scripture says nothing about what became of the ark of the covenant.
Divine law and the word of God
165




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə