Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə73/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   ...   114

It is certain, though, that it perished or was burnt along with the Temple,
although there was nothing more sacred or venerated among the Hebrews.
Hence, Scripture too is sacred and its discourse divine in the same
way, that is so long as it moves people to devotion towards God. Should
it become completely neglected, as it once was by the Jews, it is thereby
rendered nothing but ink and paper and becomes absolutely devoid of
sanctity and subject to corruption. If it is then perverted or perishes,
it is not true to say that God’s word has deteriorated or perished, just as
it would be false to say in Jeremiah’s time that it was the Temple of
God, as the Temple had been until then, that perished in the £ames.
Jeremiah himself says the same thing of the Law when rebuking the
impious men of his time in these terms: ‘How can you say, we are
trained in the Law of God and are its guardians. Assuredly, it has been
written in vain, vain is the scribe’s pen!’
2
That is, even though the
Scripture is in your hands, you are wrong to say that you are guardians
of God’s Law, now that you have rendered it ine¡ective.
So too when Moses broke the ¢rst tablets, it was not the word of God
that he cast from his hands in anger and broke (who could imagine this
of Moses or of God’s word?) but only the stones. They had been sacred
before because the covenant under which the Jews bound themselves to
obey God was inscribed upon them. But as they subsequently negated
that covenant by worshipping a [golden] calf, the stones no longer pos-
sessed any sanctity whatever. It is for the same reason that the second
tablets
3
could perish with the ark. It is thus wholly unsurprising that
Moses’ original texts are no longer extant and the process we described
in the preceding chapters could have happened to the books which we do
possess, given that the true original of the divine covenant, the most
sacred thing of all, has totally perished.
Let [my opponents] therefore cease accusing us of impiety. We have
said nothing against the word of God, nor have we corrupted it. Let them
rather turn their anger, if they have any justi¢ed anger, against the ancients
whose wickedness profaned the ark of God, the Temple, the Law and all
holy things, and rendered
162
them liable to corruption. Equally, if as the
Apostle says, in
2 Corinthians 3.3, they have a letter from God within
themselves, written not in ink but by the spirit of God, not on tablets of
stone but on tablets of £esh, on the heart, let them cease worshipping the
2
Jeremiah
8.8.
3
Exodus
34.
Theological-Political Treatise
166


letter and being so concerned about it. This I think su⁄ces to explain on
what grounds the Bible should be considered sacred and divine.
[
7] Now we must ascertain what precisely is to be understood by
‘debar Jehova’ (word of God). Now ‘debar’ means ‘word’, ‘speech’, ‘edict’
and ‘thing’. We showed in chapter
1
the reasons why in Hebrew a thing is
said to be of God and is ascribed to God; and from this we can readily
grasp what Scripture means by word, speech, edict and thing of God.
There is no need to repeat it all here, nor for that matter the third point
we made, regarding miracles in chapter
6
. It su⁄ces to recall the substance
of it, so that what we want to say about our present topic may be better
understood.
When ‘word of God’ is predicated of a subject which is not God
himself, it properly signi¢es the divine law which we discussed in chapter
4
, that is, the religion which is universal or common to the whole human
race. On this subject see Isaiah
1.10 etc., where Isaiah teaches the true
way of living, that does not consist in ceremonies but in charity and
integrity of mind, and calls it interchangeably God’s law and the word of
God. It is also used metaphorically for the order of nature itself and fate ^
since in truth this depends upon the eternal decree of the divine nature
and follows it ^ and especially for what the prophets foresaw of this
order. For they did not see future things by means of their natural causes
but rather as the decisions or decrees of God. It is also used for every
pronouncement of any prophet, in so far as he had grasped it by his
own particular virtue or prophetic gift and not by the common
natural light, and the primary reason for this is that the prophets were
in truth accustomed to envisage God as a legislator, as we showed in
chapter
4
.
The Bible, consequently, is called the word of God for these three rea-
sons: (
1) because it teaches true religion of which the eternal God is the
author; (
2) because it o¡ers predictions of future things as decrees of God;
and (
3) because those who were its actual authors for the most part taught
these things, not by the common natural light of reason, but by a light
peculiar to themselves, and portrayed
163
God as saying them. Although there
is much besides in Scripture which is merely historical and to be under-
stood by the natural light, its designation as God’s word is taken from its
most important feature.
Divine law and the word of God
167


[
8] From this we readily see how God is to be understood as the
author of the Bible. It is owing to the true religion that it teaches and not
because he wanted to present human beings with a certain number of
books. We may also see why the Bible is divided into the books of the
Old and the New Testament. It is because before Christ’s coming the
prophets were accustomed to proclaim religion as the law of the coun-
try based upon the covenant entered into at the time of Moses; whereas
after Christ’s coming the Apostles preached religion to all people
everywhere, as the universal law, based solely upon Christ’s passion. It
is not because the books of the Testaments di¡er in doctrine, nor
because they were written as covenantal texts, nor, ¢nally, because the
universal religion, which is supremely natural, was anything new,
except to those people who did not know it: ‘he was in the world’, says
John the Evangelist
1.10,‘and the world did not know him’. Therefore,
even if we had fewer books, whether of the Old or of the New Testa-
ment, we would still not be deprived of the word of God (by which is
properly meant, as we have just said, true religion), just as we do not
now regard ourselves as deprived of it, even though we do now lack
many other excellent writings, like the Book of the Law which was
zealously preserved in the Temple as the text of the covenant, and the
Books of the Wars, the Books of the Chronicles, and many, many oth-
ers, from which the books of the Old Testament which we now possess
were selected and assembled.
[
9] All this is con¢rmed by many other arguments:
(
1) In neither Testament were the books written at one and the
same time, for all centuries, by express command but rather from time to
time by speci¢c individuals in the way their times and individual tempera-
ments dictated. This is made clear by the callings of the prophets (who were
called to admonish the impious men of their time) and by the Epistles of the
Apostles.
(
2) It is one thing to understand Scripture and the minds of the prophets
and quite another to understand the mind of God which is the very truth of a
thing as follows from what we showed about the prophets in chapter
2
. This
distinction applies no less to histories and to miracles, as we showed in chapter
6
. But this same [vast di¡erence] can not be said to be present in those
passages which speak of true religion and true virtue.
Theological-Political Treatise
168




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə