Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə74/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   ...   114

(
3) The books of the Old Testament
164
were selected from among many
others, and collected and approved by a council of Pharisees, as we showed in
chapter
10
. The books of the New Testament were also brought into the canon
by the decrees of certain councils, whose decrees discarded as spurious
numerous other texts which were widely held to be sacred. Now the member-
ship of these councils (both Pharisaic and Christian) did not consist of pro-
phets but solely of teachers and learned men. Nevertheless we must
necessarily admit that in thus making this selection they took the word of
God as their criterion, and hence before approving any books, must necessa-
rily have had a conception of God’s word.
(
4) The Apostles wrote not as prophets but as teachers (as we said in the
previous chapter
) choosing the manner of teaching that they thought would
be easiest for the disciples whom they wanted to teach at the time. From this
it follows that there are many things in their writings (as we concluded at the
end of that chapter) which, from the point of view of religion, we are now able
to dispense with.
(
5) Finally, there are the four evangelists of the New Testament. But who
will believe that God wanted to recount Christ’s history and communicate it
to men in writing four times? Admittedly, there are some things in one
which are not found in another, and some passages help elucidate others. But
it does not follow from this that it was necessary for us to know everything the
four narrate or that God chose them to write so that the history of Christ
would be better grasped. For each preached his own gospel in a di¡erent
place, and each recorded what he had preached, doing so in a straightforward
fashion so as to tell Christ’s history clearly. None wrote so as to explain [the
versions of] the others. If they are now sometimes more readily, and better,
understood by comparison with each other, that is accidental and occurs only
in a few passages; and were these passages unknown, the story would still be
just as evident and men no less happy.
[
10] These considerations prove that Scripture is properly termed
the word of God only with respect to religion, i.e., the universal divine
law.
4
It remains now to show that, in so far as it is properly so called, it is
not defective or distorted or truncated. Here, I call a text defective,
4
It is typical of Spinoza to rede¢ne the meaning of the term ‘religion’ in this way. In his philosophy
‘true religion’ means following the universal and absolute rules of morality, which can only be
demonstrated according to him, philosophically, and hence understood only by a few, but which
revealed religions do, or at least should, teach all men to ‘obey’.
Divine law and the word of God
169


distorted or truncated which is so badly written and composed that its
sense cannot be discerned from its use of language or elicited from
Scripture itself. I refuse to grant
165
that because Scripture contains the
divine law, it has always preserved the same points, the same letters and
the same words (I leave this for the Masoretes to prove and others who
have a superstitious veneration of the letter). I assert only that the mean-
ing, which alone entitles any text to be called divine, has come down to us
uncorrupted, even though the words in which it was ¢rst expressed are
deemed to have been frequently altered. As we said, this removes
nothing from the dignity of Scripture; for Scripture would be no less
divine even if written in other words or in a di¡erent language. Thus, no
one can question that in this sense we have received the divine law,
uncorrupted. For we see from Scripture itself, and without any di⁄culty
or ambiguity, that the essence of the Law is to love God above all things
and one’s neighbour as oneself. And this cannot be adulterated nor penned
in a slap-dash, error-prone manner. For if Scripture ever taught anything
else than this, it would necessarily have had to teach everything else dif-
ferently, since this is the foundation of all religion. Were this removed,
the entire structure would immediately collapse. Such a Scripture as that
would not be the same as the one we are discussing here but an altogether
di¡erent book. It remains, then, indisputable that this is what Scripture
has always taught and consequently that no error has occurred here
a¡ecting the sense, which would not have been noticed at once by every-
body. Nor could anyone have corrupted it without immediately betraying
his malicious intent.
[
11] As this foundation is thus undeniably unadulterated, the same
must be conceded about everything that £ows indisputably from it and
which is hence likewise fundamental: such as, that God exists, that he
provides for all things, that he is omnipotent, that he has decreed that
the pious will fare well and wrongdoers badly, and that our salvation
depends upon His grace alone. For Scripture everywhere manifestly tea-
ches all these things, and thus must always have taught them; otherwise
all the rest would be meaningless and without foundation. We must insist
also that all the [Bible’s] moral precepts are equally free of corruption,
since they most evidently follow from this universal foundation: to
defend justice, assist the poor, not to kill, not to covet other men’s
property, etc. None of these things, I contend, can be corrupted by
Theological-Political Treatise
170


human malice or destroyed by age. For if any of these was thus deleted, it
would be immediately restored by
166
their universal foundation, and espe-
cially by the principle of charity which in both testaments is everywhere
what is commended the most.
Furthermore, while it is impossible to imagine a crime so appalling
that it has not been committed by somebody somewhere, yet there is no
one who would attempt to abolish the Law to excuse their own crimes or
present a malicious thing as an eternal and salutary doctrine. For human
nature is evidently so fashioned that anyone (whether king or subject)
who has committed any wrong, tries to present their actions in such
colours that it will be believed that they have done nothing contrary to
right and justice.
[
12] We therefore conclude unreservedly that the entire divine uni-
versal law which Scripture teaches has come into our hands una-
dulterated. There are other things too that we cannot doubt have been
passed down to us in good faith: for example, the outlines of the biblical
histories because these were well known to everyone; at one time the
common people of the Jews were accustomed to sing of the ancient
deeds of the people in psalms. Likewise, the main points of Christ’s
deeds and passion were immediately reported throughout the Roman
empire. Unless therefore most of mankind have engaged in a conspiracy
together ^ which is not credible ^ one cannot believe that later genera-
tions have transmitted the main lines of these histories otherwise than as
they received them from the earliest generation. Consequently, anything
adulterated or spurious could only have occurred in the remaining
material ^ whether in some circumstance of a historical narrative or
prophecy designed to incite the people to greater devotion, or in some
miracle intended to outrage philosophers, or in philosophical matters
after [various] schismatics began to mingle these with religion and each
of them strove to win support for his own fabrications by abusing divine
authority in this way. But it is irrelevant to salvation whether things of
this kind are corrupt or not, as I will show explicitly in the
next chapter
,
although I think it is already evident from what we have already said,
especially in chapter
2
.
Divine law and the word of God
171




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə