Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə75/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   ...   114

chapter 13
167
Where it is shown that the teachings of Scripture
are very simple, and aim only to promote
obedience, and tell us nothing about the divine
nature beyond what men may emulate by a
certain manner of life
[
1] We proved in chapter
2
of this treatise that the prophets possessed
extraordinary powers of imagination but not of understanding, and that
it was not the deeper points of philosophy that God revealed to them but
only some very simple matters, adapting Himself to their preconceived
beliefs. We then showed in chapter
5
that Scripture explains and teaches
things in such a way that anyone may grasp them. It does not deduce and
derive them from axioms and de¢nitions, but speaks simply, and to
secure belief in its pronouncements, it con¢rms them by experience
alone, that is, by miracles and histories narrated in a language and style
designed to in£uence the minds of the common people: on this see
chapter
6
(point
3).
1
Finally, we demonstrated in chapter
7
that the di⁄-
culty of comprehending the Bible lies solely in the language and not in
the sublimity of its content. There is the further problem, though, that
the prophets were not addressing the learned among the Jews but the
entire people without exception, and the Apostles likewise were accus-
tomed to proclaim the Gospel teaching in churches where there was a mis-
cellaneous congregation of all types of people. From all this it follows that
biblical teaching contains no elevated theories or philosophical doctrines
but only the simplest matters comprehensible to even the very slowest.
1
For point
3 in ch.
6
, see pp.
89^92.
172


[
2] I never cease to be amazed at the ingenuity of those I mentioned
earlier who uncover in Scripture mysteries too profound to be explained
in any human terms and hence imported into religion so many philoso-
phical questions that the Church now resembles a university and religion
a ¢eld of learning or, rather, ceaseless learned controversy. But, then, why
should one be astonished if those who claim to have a supernatural light
are unwilling to defer in knowledge to philosophers who claim nothing
more than natural understanding? Rather it would be truly surprising
had these men introduced anything novel, on any philosophical ques-
tion, that had not long before been
168
commonplace among pagan philo-
sophers (despite which they claim the latter were ‘blind’). For if you ask
what mysteries they discover hidden in Scripture, you will ¢nd nothing
but the fabrications of Aristotle or Plato or some like philosopher which
mostly could be more readily dreamt up by some layman than derived
from Scripture by even the most consummate scholar.
[
3] We do not mean to lay it down as an absolute rule that nothing of a
purely philosophic nature is inherent in the Bible. Indeed, we mentioned
certain such things in the
previous chapter
as fundamental principles of
Scripture. My point is that such things are very few and extremely sim-
ple. I propose now to demonstrate what these are and how they are
de¢ned. This will be straightforward for us now that we know that it was
not the purpose of the Bible to teach any branch of knowledge. For from
this we can readily infer that it requires nothing of men other than obe-
dience, and condemns not ignorance but disobedience. Since obedience
to God consists solely in love of our neighbour (for he who loves his
neighbour, with the intention of obeying God, has ful¢lled the Law, as
Paul observes in his Epistle to the Romans,
13.8), it follows that the only
knowledge commended in Scripture is that which everyone needs to
obey God according to this command, that is if, lacking this knowledge,
they must necessarily be disobedient or at least de¢cient in the habit of
obedience. All other philosophical concerns that do not directly lead to this
goal, whether concerned with knowledge of God or of natural things, are
irrelevant to Scripture and must therefore be set aside from revealed religion.
[
4] Anyone may now readily see this for himself, as I have said. Never-
theless, I want to set the whole thing out yet more carefully and explain it
more clearly, since the entire question of what religion is depends on it.
The teachings of Scripture
173


For this purpose, we need to demonstrate, ¢rst and foremost, that an
intellectual or precise knowledge of God is not a gift generally given to
all the faithful, in the way that obedience is. Secondly, we must prove
that that knowledge which God, via the prophets, required all men to
possess universally and which every individual is obliged to possess,
consists of nothing other than an understanding of God’s justice and
charity. Both of these points are readily demonstrated from Scripture itself.
[
5] For (1), the ¢rst point, most evidently follows from Exodus 6.3,
where in showing Moses the singular
169
grace given to him, God says: ‘And
I was revealed to Abraham, to Isaac and to Jacob as El Shaddai, but I was
not known to them by my name Jehovah.’ To clarify this, we must note
that El Shaddai in Hebrew signi¢es ‘God who su⁄ces’ because he gives
each person what su⁄ces for him; and although Shaddai is often used on
its own to refer to God, we should not doubt that the word El (‘God’)
should always be silently understood. We should further note that no
name is found in the Bible other than Jehovah to indicate the absolute
essence of God without relation to created things. The Hebrews there-
fore claim this is the only proper name of God and that all the others are
forms of address; and in truth the other names of God, whether they are
nouns or adjectives, are attributes which belong to God in so far as He is
considered in relation to his creatures or manifested through them. An
example is El (or Eloha, if we insert the paragogical letter He), which
means simply ‘powerful’, as is well-known since it belongs to God alone
in a pre-eminent degree, just as when we speak of Paul as ‘the Apostle’.
Elsewhere the virtues of his power are given in full, as El (‘powerful’),
great, terrible, just, merciful, etc., or the word is used in the plural but
with a singular meaning, as is very common in Scripture, in order to
include all his virtues at the same time.
Hence, God tells Moses that he was not known to the patriarchs by
the name of Jehovah. The patriarchs, it follows, knew no attribute of God
disclosing his absolute essence, but only his acts and promises, i.e., his
power in so far as it is manifest through visible things. However, God
does not tell Moses this so as to charge the patriarchs with lack of faith
but, on the contrary, to praise their faith and trust, by which they
believed God’s promises to be true and certain, despite their lacking the
exceptional knowledge of God that Moses had. For while Moses pos-
sessed more elevated conceptions of God, he entertained doubts about
Theological-Political Treatise
174




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə