Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə76/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   ...   114

the divine promises and complained to God that instead of the promised
salvation the Jews’ situation was getting worse and worse.
The patriarchs, then, were ignorant of the unique name of God, and
God communicated it to Moses so as to extol their faith and the simplicity
of their hearts, and also to emphasize the singular grace granted to Moses.
From this, it follows most evidently, as we asserted in the ¢rst place, that
people are not obliged by commandment to know God’s attributes; this is a
particular gift bestowed only on certain of the faithful. It is not worth
adding further testimonies from the Bible to prove this; for who does not
see that the knowledge of God has not been equal among all the faithful?
and that no one can be wise by command any more than he can live or exist
by command? All equally, men, women and children, can obey by com-
mand but cannot all be wise.
[
6] But if anyone answers that there is indeed no need to understand
God’s attributes but only to believe them,
170
quite simply, without demon-
stration, he is certainly talking nonsense. For invisible things which are
objects of the mind alone can not be seen with any other eyes than through
conceptual demonstrations. Those people therefore who do not grasp the
demonstrations, see nothing at all of these things, and therefore whatever
they report from hearsay about such questions, neither a¡ects nor indi-
cates their minds any more than the words of a parrot or a robot which
speaks without mind and sense.
[
7] Now, before going any further, I need to explain why it is often stated
in Genesis that the patriarchs called God by the name of Jehovah. This
appears to stand in straight contradiction with what I have just said. If we
recall, however, what we proved in chapter
8
, we shall readily be able to
reconcile this [seeming contradiction]. In that chapter we showed that the
compiler of the Pentateuch does not denote things and places with pre-
cisely the names they had at the time to which he refers but rather with
those by which they were better known in his own time. God is hence
recounted in Genesis as being called by the patriarchs by the name of
Jehovah, not because he was known to them by that name, but rather
because this was a name supremely revered by the Jews.This is the inference
we must come to, I repeat, as we are expressly told in our text from Exodus
2
2
Exodus
6:3.
The teachings of Scripture
175


that God was unknown to the patriarchs by that title and, likewise, in
Exodus
3.13 Moses desires to know God’s name, whereas had it been pre-
viously known, he too would have known of it. One must therefore con-
clude, as I contend, that the faithful patriarchs were ignorant of this divine
name, and that knowledge of God is God’s gift but not his command.
[
8] (2) We should now pass on to our second point and demonstrate
that the only knowledge of Himself God requires of men, via the pro-
phets, is knowledge of His divine justice and love, that is, those attri-
butes of God that men may emulate by a sound rationale of life.
Jeremiah teaches this in so
171
many words. At
22.15^16 speaking of King
Josiah, he says: ‘Your father indeed ate and drank and passed judgment
and administered justice, then it’ (was) ‘well with him, he defended the
right of the poor and indigent, then it’ (was) ‘well with him, for’ (N.B.)
‘this is to know me, said Jehovah’. No less clear is
9. 23: ‘but in this alone
let each man glory, that he understands me and knows me, that I Jehovah
practise charity, judgment and justice on earth, for in these things I
delight, says Jehovah’. This is also the signi¢cance of Exodus
34.6^7
where when Moses desires to see and know God, God only reveals to
him His attributes of justice and love. Lastly, a verse of John,
3
which
I shall also discuss later, is particularly relevant. It explains God by love
alone, since no one has seen him, and concludes that he who has love,
truly has God and knows him.
We see, then, that Jeremiah, Moses and John very succinctly summarize
the knowledge of God each man is obliged to have. They make it consist in
this one single thing, as we argued, that God is supremely just and
supremely merciful, or the one and only exemplar of the true life. Fur-
thermore, the Bible gives no explicit de¢nition of God, and does not
decree that any attributes of God be accepted other than those we speci-
¢ed just now, and these are the only ones that it commends. From all of
this, we conclude that intellectual knowledge of God, considering His
nature as it is in itself, a nature which men cannot emulate by a certain
rationale of living and cannot adopt as a paradigm for cultivating a true
rationale of living, has no relevance whatsoever to faith and revealed reli-
gion, and consequently men may have totally the wrong ideas about God’s
nature without doing any wrong.
3
1 John 4.7^8.
Theological-Political Treatise
176


[
9] It is not in the least surprising, therefore, that God adapted Himself
to the imaginations and preconceived opinions of the prophets and that
the faithful have held con£icting views about God, as we showed with
numerous examples in chapter
2
. Nor is it at all surprising that the sacred
books express themselves so inappropriately about God throughout,
attributing hands and feet to him, and
172
eyes and ears, and movement in
space, as well as mental emotions, such as being jealous, merciful, etc., and
depicting him as a judge and as sitting on a royal throne in heaven with
Christ at his right hand. They are here manifestly speaking according
to the [utterly de¢cient] understanding of the common people, whom
Scripture strives to render not learned but obedient.
However, theologians as a rule have contended that whatever they could
discern with the natural light of reason is inappropriate to the divine nat-
ure and must be interpreted metaphorically and whatever eludes their
understanding must be accepted in the literal sense. But if everything of
this sort which is found in the Bible had necessarily to be construed and
explained metaphorically, then Scripture would have been composed not
for common folk and uneducated people, but exclusively for the most
learned and philosophical. Moreover, were it really impious, to attribute to
God piously and in simplicity of heart those characteristics we have just
mentioned, the prophets would certainly have been particularly scrupu-
lous about phrases of this sort given the intellectual limitations of ordinary
people, if for no other reason.They would have made it their principal aim
to teach God’s attributes clearly and explicitly as everyone is obliged to
accept them. But nowhere do they in fact do this.
We should certainly not accept, therefore, that beliefs considered as
such, in isolation and without regard to actions, entail anything of piety
or impiety at all. We must rather assert that a person believes something
piously or impiously only in so far as they are moved to obedience by
their beliefs or, as a result of them, deem themselves free to o¡end or
rebel [against God’s word]. Hence, if anyone is rendered disobedient by
believing the truth, he truly has an impious faith; in so far, on the other
hand, as he becomes obedient through believing what is false, he has
truly a pious faith. For we have shown that true knowledge of God is not
a command but a divine gift, and God requires no other knowledge from
men than that of his divine justice and charity, knowledge required not
for intellectual understanding but only for obedience [to the moral law].
The teachings of Scripture
177




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə