Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə77/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   114

chapter 14
173
What faith is, who the faithful are, the foundations
of faith de¢ned, and faith de¢nitively
distinguished from philosophy
[
1] For a true knowledge of faith it is above all necessary to acknowledge
that the Bible is adapted to the understanding not only of the prophets but
also of the ¢ckle and capricious common people among the Jews. No one
who studies this point even casually can miss this. Anyone who accepts
everything in Scripture indi¡erently as God’s universal and absolute doc-
trine and cannot correctly identify what is adapted to the notions of the
common people, will be incapable of separating their opinions from divine
doctrine. He will put forward human beliefs and fabrications as God’s
teaching and thereby abuse the authority of the Bible. Who does not see
that this is the principal reason why sectaries teach so many mutually
contradictory beliefs as doctrines of faith, and support them with many
examples from Scripture, so much so that the Dutch long ago produced a
saying about it: ‘every heretic has his text’? For the sacred books were not
written by one man alone, nor for the common people of a single period,
but by a large number of men, of di¡erent temperaments and at di¡erent
times, and if we calculate the period from the earliest to the latest, it will be
found to be around two thousand years and possibly much longer.
We do not mean to charge these sectarians with impiety for adapting
the words of the Bible to their own beliefs. Just as it was once adapted to
the understanding of the common people, so also anyone may adapt it to
his own beliefs if he sees that in this way he can obey God with fuller
mental assent in matters concerning justice and charity. We do accuse
them, however, of refusing to grant the same liberty to others. They
178


p e rs e cute all who do not think a s they do a s if they we re e n e mi e s of Go d,
eve n though they may b e the m o st honou rable of me n and de dic ate d to
tr ue vir tue while they e ste e m tho s e who ag re e with the m a s the ele ct of
Go d, eve n if they are the m o st viole n t of me n. Su rely nothing c ould b e
devis e d which is m ore p e r nic ious and dange rous to the st ate.
[
2 ] He nce , in orde r to dete r mine how far e ach p e rs on p o s s e s s e s
fre e dom to think whateve r they wish 
174
ab out faith and who we should
re gard a s the tr ue faithful eve n if the ir b eli efs di¡e r from ou rs , we must
[c or re ctly] de¢n e faith and its fu ndame n t al pr inc iple s. This is what
I prop o s e to do in this chapte r, and at the s ame t i me I prop o s e to s e pa -
rate faith from philo s ophy which, inde e d, ha s b e e n the pr inc ipal pur p o s e
of the whole work.
[
3] To do this in an orderly manner, let us restate the supreme purpose of
the whole of the Bible, for that will guide us to the true criterion for
de¢ning faith. We s aid in the 
la st chapte r
 that the s ole aim of Scr iptu re is to
teach obedience [to the moral law].This no one can contest.Who does not
see that both testaments are nothing but a training in such obedience?
And that both testaments teach men this one single thing, to obey in all
sincerity? For, not to repeat the evidence I o¡ered in the last chapter,
Moses did not attempt to persuade the Israelites with reason but rather to
bind them with a covenant, by oaths and with bene¢ts; he then constrained
the people to obey the law by threatening them with penalties and
encouraging them with rewards. These are all methods for inculcating
obedience not knowledge. Likewise, the Gospel’s teaching contains noth-
ing other than simple faith: to believe in God and to revere him, or, which
is the same thing, to obey him.To demonstrate something so obvious, I do
not need to accumulate texts of Scripture commending obedience; for
these abound in both testaments.
Similarly, the Bible teaches us itself, in numerous passages and with
utter clarity, what each of us must do to obey God. It teaches that the
entire Law consists in just one thing, namely love of one’s neighbour. No
one can deny that the person who loves his neighbour as himself by
God’s command, is truly obedient and blessed according to the
Law, whereas anyone who hates his neighbour and neglects him, is
rebellious and disobedient. Finally it is universally acknowledged that
Scripture was written and published not just for the learned but for all
Faith and philosophy
179


people of every age and sort. From these things alone it most evidently
follows that we are not obliged by Scripture to believe anything other
than what is absolutely necessary to ful¢l this command. Hence, this
decree alone is the one and only rule of the entire universal faith; it alone
must govern all dogmas of faith, that is, all dogmas that everyone is
obliged to believe.
[
4] Since this is entirely obvious and
175
everyone can see that everything
can properly be deduced from this foundation alone or by reason alone,
how could it have happened that so many dissensions have arisen in the
church? Could there have been other causes than those we set out at the
beginning of chapter
7
? This is what compels me to explain at this point
the correct method and means of de¢ning the dogmas of faith on the
foundation we have discovered. Unless I do this, and de¢ne the matter
by certain rules, I shall rightly be thought not to have got very far. For
anyone will be able to introduce any novelty they like by insisting it is a
necessary means to obedience, especially when it is a question of the
divine attributes.
[
5] In order to set the whole thing out in proper order, I will begin with
the de¢nition of faith. On the basis of the foundation we have laid down,
faith can only be de¢ned by, indeed can be nothing other than, acknowl-
edging certain things about God, ignorance of which makes obedience
towards him impossible and which are necessarily found wherever obedi-
ence is met with. This de¢nition is so evident and follows so plainly from
what we have just demonstrated that it requires no commentary.
[
6] I will now explain in a few words what follows from it.
(
1) It follows that faith does not lead to salvation in itself, but only by
means of obedience, or, as James says at
2.17, faith by itself without works is
dead; on this subject see the whole of this chapter of James.
[
7]
(
2) It follows that whoever is truly obedient [to the moral law] necessarily
possesses the true faith which leads to salvation. For, as we said, if obedience is
met with, faith too is necessarily found, as the same Apostle explicitly states
(
2.18): ‘Show me your faith apart from your works, and I will show you my faith
from my works’. John likewise a⁄rms in his ¢rst Epistle (
1 John 4.7^8):
‘Whoever loves’ (i.e. his neighbour), ‘is born of God and knows God; he who
Theological-Political Treatise
180




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə