Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə80/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   ...   114

chapter 15
Where it is shown that theology is not subordinate to
reason nor reason to theology, and why it is we are
persuaded of the authority of Holy Scripture
[
1] Those who do not know how to distinguish philosophy from theology
dispute as to whether Scripture should be subject to reason or whether, on
the contrary, reason should be the servant of Scripture: that is to say,
whether the sense of Scripture should be accommodated to reason or
whether reason should be subordinated to Scripture.The latter position is
adopted by sceptics who deny the certainty of reason, and the former
defended by dogmatists. But from what we have previously said it is
obvious that both are absolutely wrong. For whichever position we adopt,
we would have to distort either reason or Scripture since we have demon-
strated that the Bible does not teach philosophical matters but only piety,
and everything in Scripture is adapted to the understanding and pre-
conceptions of the common people. Hence, anyone who tries to accom-
modate the Bible to philosophy will undoubtedly ascribe to the prophets
many things that they did not imagine even in their dreams and will con-
strue their meaning wrongly. On the other hand, anyone who makes reason
and philosophy the servant of theology will be obliged to accept as divinely
inspired the prejudices of the common people of antiquity and let his
mind be taken over and clouded by them. Thus both will proceed sense-
lessly, albeit the latter without reason and the former with it.
[
2] The ¢rstof thePharisees [i.e.in the rabbinictradition]who openlytook
the position that Scripture must
181
be adapted to reason was Maimonides
(whose stance we reviewed in chapter
7
and refuted with many arguments).
186


Although this author has been a great authority among the rabbis, on this
particular question most of them have deserted him and gone over to the
opinion of a certain Rabbi Jehuda Al-Fakhar,
1
who in attempting to avoid
Maimonides’ error has fallen into the opposite one. He took the position
2
that reason should be subordinate to Scripture and indeed wholly sub-
jected to it. He did not believe that anything in the Bible should be
explained metaphorically merely because the literal sense is in con£ict with
reason but only where it con£icts with Scripture itself, that is, with its evi-
dent dogmas. Hence he formulates the universal rule that anything that
Scripture teaches dogmatically
3
and a⁄rms in explicit words, we must
accept as true unreservedly solely on the basis of its authority. Furthermore,
he maintained, no dogma will be found in the Bible which contradicts it
directly but only by implication, because Scripture’s modes of expression
often seem to assume something other than what it teaches directly, and
these are the only passages that need to be explained metaphorically.
For example, Scripture expressly teaches that God is one (see Deuter-
onomy
6.14), and there is no passage anywhere directly asserting that there
is more than one God. However, there are several passages where God
speaks of himself in the plural, as also do the prophets.This is a manner of
speaking which seemingly implies there are several gods, though the
intent of the expression does not assert it. All such passages should
therefore be explained metaphorically, not because they are in con£ict
with reason but because Scripture itself directly asserts that there is one
God. Likewise, because Scripture, at Deuteronomy
4.15, according to
Al-Fakhar, £atly asserts that God is incorporeal, we must believe, on the
basis of this passage alone ^ and not of reason, that God has no body, and
consequently, on the authority of Scripture alone, we must lend a meta-
phorical interpretation to all passages which attribute to God hands and
feet and so on, whose phrasing by itself seems to imply a corporeal God.
[
3] This is the contention of al-Fakhar, and in so far as it seeks to
explain Scripture solely via Scripture, I applaud it. But I am surprised that
someone endowed with reason should try so hard to destroy reason. It is
1
I.e. Jehuda al-Fakhar, a physician in early thirtheenth-century Toledo who was among the leading
rabbinic opponents of Maimonides’ Aristotelian rationalism.
2
Spinoza’s footnote: N. B. I remember that I once read this in the letter against Maimonides, which
occurs among the so called ‘Letters of Maimonides’.
3
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
28.
Theology and reason
187


indeed true that Scripture must
182
be explained by Scripture, so long as we
are only deriving the sense of the passages and the meaning of the pro-
phets, but after we have arrived at the true sense, we must necessarily use
our judgment and reason before giving assent to it. If reason must be
entirely subject to Scripture despite its protests against it, I ask whether we
should do this in accordance with reason or, like blind men, without rea-
son. If the latter, then we are certainly acting stupidly and without any
judgment. But what of the former? We are in that case accepting Scripture
solely at the command of reason, and therefore we would not accept it
where it is in con£ict with reason. I also ask, who can accept anything with
his mind if his reason protests against it? For what is it to reject something
with your mind but a protest of reason?
Assuredly, I am utterly amazed that men should want to subject reason,
the greatest gift and the divine light, to ancient words which may well have
been adulterated with malicious intent. I am amazed that it should not be
thought a crime to speak disparagingly of the mind, the true text of God’s
word, and to proclaim it corrupt, blind and depraved, while deeming it the
highest o¡ence to think such things of the mere letter and image of God’s
word. They consider it pious not to trust their reason and their own judg-
ment and deem it impious to have doubts concerning the reliability of
those who have handed down the sacred books to us. This is plain stupid-
ity, not piety. But I ask, why does the use of reason worry them? What are
they afraid of? Can religion and faith not be defended, unless we make
ourselves ignorant of everything and reason is totally dispensed with? If
they believe that, then surely such people fear Scripture more than they
trust it. Religion and piety should not wish to have reason for a servant nor
should reason wish to have religion for a servant. Both should be able to
rule their own realms in the greatest harmony. I will explain this directly,
but I want ¢rst to examine the rule of this rabbi [i.e., R. Al-Fakhar].
[
4] As we said, he wants us to be bound to accept as true everything that
Scripture a⁄rms and reject as false everything Scripture denies, and he
holds that the Bible never a⁄rms or denies in explicit terms anything
contrary to what it a⁄rms or denies in another passage.Yet everyone must
see how very rash these two positions are. I will omit here what he did
not remark, that Scripture consists of a variety of di¡erent books, of
di¡erent periods and for di¡erent men, and compiled by a variety of
authors; I will also pass over the point that he makes these assertions on
Theological-Political Treatise
188




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə