Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə81/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   114

his own authority and that neither reason nor Scripture assert anything
comparable. He ought to have shown
183
from the character of the language
and the purpose of the passage, that all passages that are in con£ict with
others only by implication, can be properly construed metaphorically as
well as that Scripture has come down to us uncorrupted.
But let us examine the issue methodically and consider the ¢rst point:
what if reason protests? Are we still obliged to accept as true what
Scripture a⁄rms and reject as false whatever Scripture denies? Perhaps
he will say that nothing is found in Scripture which is in con£ict with
reason. But Scripture, I contend, expressly a⁄rms that God is jealous
(namely in the Ten Commandments and at Exodus
24.14 and Deuter-
onomy
4.24 and several other passages). This is in con£ict with reason,
despite which we should supposedly regard this as true. Any passages in
Scripture implying that God is not jealous would then necessarily have
to be explained metaphorically, so that they would not appear to assume
anything of the sort. Likewise, the Bible expressly states that God des-
cended to Mount Sinai (see Exodus
19.20, etc.), and ascribes other local
motions to Him, and nowhere explicitly asserts that God does not move.
Thus, this too would have to be admitted by all men as true while
Solomon’s assertion that God is not contained in any place (see
1 Kings
8.27), not being a direct statement but just a consequence of deducing
that God does not move, will therefore have to be explained in such a
way that it does not deny local motion to God. Equally, the heavens
would have to be considered the dwelling-place and throne of God since
Scripture expressly a⁄rms it. There are very many things phrased in this
way, in accordance with the beliefs of the prophets and the common
people, which reason and philosophy, though not Scripture, reveal to be
false. Yet all of them, in the view of al-Fakhar, must be accepted as true,
since there is no consultation with reason concerning these questions.
[
5] Secondly, he is mistaken in claiming that one passage contradicts
another passage only by implication, and never directly. For Moses directly
asserts that ‘God is ¢re’ (see Deuteronomy
4.24) and £atly denies God has
any similarity to visible things (see Deuteronomy
4.12). If he responds that
the latter does not deny God is ¢re directly but only by implication, and
that we must reconcile it with the other passage, so that it may not seem to
deny it, well then, let us concede that God is ¢re, or rather, in order not
to participate in such nonsense, let us discard this example and proceed
Theology and reason
189


to another. Samuel clearly denies
4
that
184
God repents of his decisions (see
1 Samuel 15.29) while Jeremiah by contrast maintains that God repents of
the good and evil which he has decreed (see Jeremiah
18.8^10). Now, are
these two passages not plainly contradictory to each other? Which then of
the two propositions does he propose to interpret metaphorically? Both
are universal but contrary to the other; what one plainly a⁄rms, the other
directly denies. Thus, by his rule he must both accept the fact as true and
reject it as false.
But again, what does it matter that a passage does not contradict
another directly but only by implication, if the implication is clear and
the context and nature of the passage does not admit metaphorical
interpretation? There are very many such passages in the Bible. See
chapter
2
(where we showed that the prophets held di¡erent and contrary
opinions), and especially look at the numerous contradictions we pointed
out in the histories (in chapters
9
and
10
).
[
6] I need not go through them all again here, for what I have said su⁄ces
to demonstrate the absurdities that follow from this opinion and such a
rule, how false these are and how super¢cial the author.
We must therefore dismiss both this theory and that of Maimonides.
We have established it as absolutely certain that theology should not be
subordinate to reason, nor reason to theology, but rather that each has its
own domain. For reason, as we said, reigns over the domain of truth and
wisdom, theology over that of piety and obedience. For the power of
reason, as we have shown, cannot extend to ensuring that people may be
happy by obedience alone without understanding things, while theology
tells us nothing other than this and decrees nothing but obedience.
Theology has no designs against reason, and cannot have any. For the
dogmas of faith (as we showed in the
previous chapter
) determine only
what is necessary for obedience, and leave it to reason to determine how
precisely they are to be understood in relation to truth. Reason is the
true light of the mind without which it discerns nothing but dreams and
fantasies.
By theology here I mean precisely revelation in so far as it proclaims the
purpose which we said that Scripture intends, namely the method and
manner of obedience that is the dogmas of true piety and faith. This is
4
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
29.
Theological-Political Treatise
190


what is properly termed the word of
185
God, which does not consist in a
speci¢c collection of books (on this see chapter
12
). If you consider the
commands or moral advice of theology understood in this way, you will
¢nd that it agrees with reason, and if you look at its intent and purpose,
you will see that in fact it does not con£ict with reason in anything. Hence,
it is universal to all men.
As regards Scripture generally, when considered as a whole, we have
already shown in chapter
7
that its sense must be determined solely from
its own history and never from the universal history of nature which is
the sole ground of philosophy. If we ¢nd, after we have investigated its
true sense in this way, that in places it con£icts with reason, this should
not trouble us at all. For we know for certain that nothing of this sort
encountered in the Bible, and nothing men can be ignorant of without
loss of charity, has the least e¡ect on theology or on the word of God.
Consequently, everyone may think whatever they like about such matters
without doing wrong. We conclude therefore without hesitation that
Scripture is not to be accommodated to reason nor reason to Scripture.
[
7] Yet since we are unable to prove by means of reason whether the
fundamental principle of theology ^ that men are saved by obedience
alone ^ is true or false, are we not open to the question: why therefore do
we believe it? If we accept it without reason, like blind men, are we not
acting stupidly and without judgment? If on the other hand we try to assert
that this principle can be proved by reason, theology will then become part
of philosophy and could not be separated from it.To this I reply that I hold
categorically that the fundamental dogma of theology cannot be dis-
covered by the natural light, or at least that no one has yet proven it, and
that is why revelation was absolutely indispensable. Nevertheless, we can
use our judgment to accept it with at any rate moral certainty now that it
has been revealed. I say ‘with moral certainty’, since it is impossible for us
to be more certain of it than the prophets themselves were to whom it was
¢rst revealed, and theirs, as we showed in chapter
2
of this treatise, was
solely a moral certainty.
It is therefore wholly erroneous to try to demonstrate the authority of
Scripture by mathematical proofs. For the Bible’s authority depends
upon that of the prophets, and therefore cannot be demonstrated by
stronger arguments than those with
186
which the prophets in their time
were accustomed to convince the people of their authority. Indeed,
Theology and reason
191




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə