Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə82/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   ...   114

certainty here can rest only on the foundation on which the prophets
rested their assuredness and authority. We showed that the assuredness
of the prophets consisted in three things: (
1) a clear and vivid imagi-
nation, (
2) a sign and (3) ¢nally and especially, a mind devoted to justice
and goodness. These were their only grounds, and therefore these are
also the only grounds on which they could prove their authority to
those to whom in their time they spoke with their living voices or can
prove it to us whom they address in writing.
Now the ¢rst thing, the vivid imagination of things, could only be
available to the prophets themselves, and therefore all of our certainty
about revelation can and should rest solely upon the other two things,
namely the sign and their teaching. Moses too asserts this explicitly. At
Deuteronomy chapter
18
he commands the people to obey a prophet
who has given a true sign in the name of God, but to condemn to death
any who made false declarations even in the name of God, as well as any
who attempted to seduce the people from true religion, even where they
con¢rmed their authority with wonders and portents. On this question
see Deuteronomy
13, from which it follows that a true prophet is dis-
tinguished from a false one by both teaching and miracles. For Moses
declares that such a man thus distinguished is a true prophet, and bids
the people believe him without any fear of deception, while those who
have proclaimed false teachings even in the name of God, or who have
taught false gods, even if they have wrought true miracles, are false
prophets and deserve death.
This is why we too are obliged to believe in Scripture, i.e., the pro-
phets themselves, on precisely the same grounds: teaching con¢rmed by
miracles. Since we see that the prophets commend justice and charity
above all things and plead for these alone, we deduce they were sincere
and not deceitful in teaching that men are made happy by obedience and
faith; and because they also con¢rmed this with signs, we are convinced
they were not speaking wildly or madly when they prophesied. We are
further persuaded of this when we note that they o¡ered no moral
teaching which is not in accord with reason. Nor is it coincidental that
the word of God in the prophets agrees completely with the actual word
of God speaking in us [through reason]. These things, then, we infer
from the Bible with just as much certainty as the Jews in their time
understood them from the living
187
voice of the prophets. For we showed
above, at the end of chapter
12
, that the Bible has descended to us
Theological-Political Treatise
192


unadulterated as regards its [moral] doctrine and the main historical
narratives.
So it is a sound judgment to accept this fundamental principle
embracing the whole of theology and Scripture, even though it cannot be
demonstrated by mathematical proof. For it is indeed ignorance to refuse
to accept something just because it cannot be mathematically demon-
strated when it is con¢rmed by the testimonies of so many prophets, is a
source of great solace for those whose capacity to reason is limited, is of
great value to the state, and may be believed unreservedly without dan-
ger or damage. As if we should admit nothing as true, for the prudent
conduct of our lives, which can be called into question by any method of
doubt, or as if so many of our actions were not highly uncertain and full
of risk!
[
8] Admittedly, those who believe that philosophy and theology con-
tradict each other and think that we should banish one or the other and
get rid of one of them, are well-advised to try to lay solid foundations for
theology and attempt to prove it mathematically. For no one who is not
without hope or insane would want to abolish reason completely or
totally reject the arts and sciences and deny the certainty of reason. And
yet we cannot altogether excuse them [for attempting to prove theology
mathematically]: for they are attempting to use reason to reject reason
and hence search for a certain reason to render reason uncertain. But in
fact, as they strive to prove the truth and authority of theology by
mathematical demonstration, and deprive reason and the natural light of
authority, what they are really doing is bringing theology itself under the
rule of reason. For underneath, they seem evidently to suppose that
theology’s authority will have no impact unless it is illuminated by the
natural light of reason.
If on the other hand they claim totally to acquiesce in the internal
testimony of the Holy Spirit, and to make use of reason only for the sake
of unbelievers, so as to convince them, we should still not trust what they
say. We can readily demonstrate straight o¡ that they assert this from
passion or vanity. For it very clearly follows from the
previous chapter
that the Holy Spirit gives testimony only about good works, which Paul
too calls the fruits of the spirit
188
(Galatians
5.22), and the spirit is in truth
simply the mental peace which arises in the mind from good actions. But
no spirit other than reason gives testimony about the truth and certainty
Theology and reason
193


of things that are purely matters for philosophy, and reason, as we have
already shown, claims the realm of truth for itself. If therefore they pre-
tend to have any other spirit that makes them certain of the truth, they
are making a false claim. They are merely speaking from their emotional
prejudices or trying to take refuge in sacred things because they are
afraid of being defeated by philosophers and publicly exposed to ridicule.
But in vain; for what altar of refuge can a man ¢nd for himself when he
commits treason against the majesty of reason?
[
9] And now I dismiss them for I think that I have done su⁄cient justice
to my own case in showing how philosophy is to be separated from theol-
ogy, and what both essentially are: neither is subordinate to the other; each
has its own kingdom; there is no con£ict between them. Finally, I have also
demonstrated, as opportunity arose, the absurdities, harm and danger,
caused by men’s amazing confusion of these two branches and their not
knowing how to distinguish accurately between them and separate the one
¢rmly from the other.
[
10] But before I go on to other things, I must emphasize very strongly
here,
5
although I have mentioned it before, the usefulness and necessity of
Holy Scripture or revelation, which I hold to be very great. For given that
we cannot discern by the natural light alone that simple obedience is the
path to salvation,
6
and revelation alone teaches us that it comes from a
singular grace of God which we cannot acquire by reason, it follows that
Scripture has brought great consolation to mortal men. Everyone without
exception can obey, not merely the very few ^ very few, that is, in compar-
ison with the whole human race ^ who acquire the habit of virtue by the
guidance of reason alone. Hence, if we did not possess this testimony of
Scripture, we would have to consider the salvation of almost all men to be
in doubt.
5
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
30.
6
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
31.
Theological-Political Treatise
194




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə