Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə83/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   ...   114

chapter 16
189
On the foundations of the state, on the natural and
civil right of each person, and on the authority of
sovereign powers
[
1] Hitherto our concern has been to separate philosophy from
theology and to establish the freedom to philosophize which this
separation allows to everyone. The time has now come to enquire how
far this freedom to think and to say what one thinks extends in the best
kind of state. To consider this in an orderly fashion, we must ¢rst dis-
cuss the foundations of the state but, before we do that, we must
explain, without reference to the state and religion, the natural right
( jus) which everyone possesses.
[
2] By the right and order of nature I merely mean the rules determining
the nature of each individual thing by which we conceive it is determined
naturally to exist and to behave in a certain way. For example ¢sh are
determined by nature to swim and big ¢sh to eat little ones, and therefore
it is by sovereign natural right that ¢sh have possession of the water and
that big ¢sh eat small ¢sh. For it is certain that nature, considered wholly
in itself, has a sovereign right to do everything that it can do, i.e., the right
of nature extends as far as its power extends. For the power of nature is the
very power of God who has supreme right to [do] all things. However, since
the universal power of the whole of nature is nothing but the power of all
individual things together, it follows that each individual thing has the
sovereign right to do everything that it can do, or the right of each thing
extends so far as its determined power extends. And since it is the supreme
law of nature that each thing strives to persist in its own state so far as it
195


can, taking no account of another’s circumstances but only of its own, it
follows that each individual thing has a sovereign right to do this, i.e. (as
I said) to exist and to behave as it is naturally determined to behave.
Here we recognize no di¡erence between human beings and other
individual things of nature, nor between those human beings who are
endowed with reason and others who do not know true reason, nor
between fools or lunatics and
190
the sane. For whatever each thing does by the
laws of its nature, that it does with sovereign right, since it is acting as it
was determined to by nature and can not do otherwise. Hence as long as
people are deemed to live under the government of nature alone, the per-
son who does not yet know reason or does not yet have a habit of virtue,
lives by the laws of appetite alone with the same supreme right as he who
directs his life by the laws of reason. That is, just as a wise man has a
sovereign right to do all things that reason dictates, i.e., [he has] the right
of living by the laws of reason, so also the ignorant or intemperate person
possesses the sovereign right to [do] everything that desire suggests, i.e.,
he has the right of living by the laws of appetite.This is precisely what Paul
is saying when he acknowledges that there is no sin before law is estab-
lished,
1
i.e., as long as men are considered as living under the government
of nature.
[
3] Each person’s natural right therefore is determined not by sound
reason but by desire and power. For it is not the case that all men are
naturally determined to behave according to the rules and laws of reason.
On the contrary, all men are born completely ignorant of everything and
before they can learn the true rationale of living and acquire the habit of
virtue, a good part of life has elapsed even if they have been well brought
up, while, in the meantime, they must live and conserve themselves so far
as they can, by the sole impulse of appetite. For nature has given them
nothing else, and has denied them the power of living on the basis of
sound reason, and consequently they are no more obliged to live by the
laws of a sound mind than a cat is by the laws of a lion’s nature. Anyone
therefore deemed to be under the government of nature alone is permitted
by the sovereign right of nature to desire anything that he believes to be
useful to himself, whether brought to this by sound reason or by the
impulse of his passions. He is permitted to take it for himself by any
1
Romans
7.7.
Theological-Political Treatise
196


means ^ by force, by fraud, by pleading ^ whatever will most easily enable
him to obtain it, and thus he is permitted to regard as an enemy anyone
who tries to prevent his getting his way.
[
4] From this it follows that the right, and the order of nature, under
which all human beings are born and for the most part live, prohibits
nothing but what no one desires or no one can do;
2
it does not prohibit
strife or hatred or anger or fraud or anything at all that appetite foments.
This is unsurprising since nature is not bound by the laws of human rea-
son which aim only at the true interest and conservation of humans, but
rather by numberless other things that
191
concern the eternal order of the
whole of nature (of which human beings are but a small part), and all
individual things are determined to live and behave in a certain way only by
the necessity of this order.When therefore we feel that anything in nature
is ridiculous, absurd or bad, it is because we know things only in part. We
wish everything to be directed in ways familiar to our reason, even though
what reason declares to be bad, is not bad with respect to the order and laws
of universal nature but only with respect to the laws of our own nature.
[
5] Nevertheless, no one can doubt how much more bene¢cial it is for
men to live according to laws and the certain dictates of reason, which as
I have said aim at nothing but men’s true interests. Besides there is no one
who does not wish to live in security and so far as that is possible without
fear; but this is very unlikely to be the case so long as everyone is allowed to
do whatever they want and reason is assigned no more right than hatred
and anger. For there is no one who does not live pervaded with anxiety
whilst living surrounded by hostility, hatred, anger and deceit and who
does not strive to avoid these in so far as they can. If we also re£ect that
without mutual help, and the cultivation of reason, human beings neces-
sarily live in great misery, as we showed in chapter
5
, we shall realize very
clearly that it was necessary for people to combine together in order to live
in security and prosperity. Accordingly, they had to ensure that they would
collectively have the right to all things that each individual had from nature
and that this right would no longer be determined by the force and appe-
tite of each individual but by the power and will of all of them together.
2
One of the key doctrines of Spinoza’s moral philosophy and one which, in e¡ect, goes well beyond
Hobbes in eliminating the whole basis of natural law as generally understood in medieval and early
modern thought.
Foundations of the state
197




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə