Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə84/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   ...   114

They would, however, have had no hope of achieving this had they
con¢ned themselves only to the promptings of desire ^ for, by the laws of
appetite, everyone is drawn in di¡erent directions.Thus, they had to make
a ¢rm decision, and reach agreement, to decide everything by the sole
dictate of reason (which no one dares contradict openly for fear of appear-
ing perfectly mindless). They had to curb their appetites so far as their
desires suggested things which would hurt someone else, and refrain from
doing anything to anyone they did not want done to themselves. Finally,
they were obliged to defend other people’s rights as their own.
[
6] Now we must consider how this agreement has to be made if it is to
be accepted and endure. For it is a universal law of human nature that no
one neglects anything that they deem good unless they hope for a greater
good or fear a greater loss, and no
192
one puts up with anything bad except
to avoid something worse or because he hopes for something better.
That is, of two good things every single person will choose the one
which he himself judges to be the greater good, and of two bad things he
will choose that which he deems to be less bad.
3
I say expressly what
appears to him the greater or lesser good when he makes this choice,
since the real situation is not necessarily as he judges it to be. This law is
so ¢rmly inscribed in human nature that it may be included among the
eternal truths that no one can fail to know. It necessarily follows that no
one will promise without deception
4
to give up his right to all things,
and absolutely no one will keep his promises except from fear of a greater
ill or hope of a greater good.
To understand this better, imagine that a highwayman forces me to
promise to give him all I have, at his demand. Since my natural right is
determined by my power alone, as I have already shown, it is certain that if
I can free myself from him by deceit, by promising whatever he wants,
I may by the law of nature do so, i.e., I may fraudulently agree to whatever
he demands. Or suppose that I have made a promise to someone in good
faith not to taste food or any sustenance for a space of twenty days and only
later realize that my promise was stupid and that I cannot keep it without
doing myself a great deal of harm. Since I am obliged by natural right to
choose the lesser of two evils, I have a sovereign right to break the bond of
3
This doctrine, developed more fully in Spinoza’s Ethics, functions consistently throughout his work
as a fundamental principle of his psychology, his moral philosophy and his political thought.
4
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
32.
Theological-Political Treatise
198


such an agreement and render what was said to be unsaid. This, I say, is
allowed by natural right, whether I see it by true and certain reason or
whether it is out of mere belief that I appear to grasp that I was wrong to
make the promise. For whether I discern things truly or falsely, it is the
greater harm that I shall fear and, by nature’s design, strive by every means
to avoid.
[
7] We conclude from this that any agreement can have force only if it
is in our interest, and when it is not in our interest, the agreement fails
and remains void. For this reason, we also conclude that it is foolish to
call for someone else to keep faith with oneself, in perpetuity, if at the
same time one does not try to ensure that violating the agreement will
result in greater loss than gain for the violator. This principle should play
the most important role in the formation of a state. For if everyone were
readily led by the guidance of reason alone and recognized the supreme
advantage and necessity of the state, everyone would utterly detest deceit
and stand fully by their promises with the utmost ¢delity because of
their concern for this highest good of preserving the state, and, above all
things, they would keep faith, which is the chief protection of the state;
but it is far from being the case that
193
everyone can easily be led by the
sole guidance of reason.
For everyone is guided by their own pleasure, and the mind is very often
so preoccupied with greed, glory, jealousy, anger, etc., that there is no room
for reason. Accordingly, even if people promise and agree to keep faith by
o¡ering sure signs of sincerity, no one can be certain of another person’s
good faith, unless something is added to the promise. For everyone can act
with deceit by the right of nature and is not obliged to stand by promises
except where there is hope of a greater good or fear of a greater evil. Now we
have already shown that natural right is determined solely by each person’s
power. If, therefore, willingly or unwillingly someone surrenders to
another a portion of the power they possess, they necessarily transfer the
same amount of their own right to the other person. Likewise, it follows
that the person possessing the sovereign power to compel all men by force
and restrain them by fear of the supreme penalty which all men universally
fear, has sovereign right over all men. This person will retain this right,
though, for only so long as he retains this power of doing whatever he
wishes; otherwise his command will be precarious, and no stronger person
will be obliged to obey him unless he wishes to do so.
Foundations of the state
199


[
8] Human society can thus be formed without any alienation of nat-
ural right, and the contract can be preserved in its entirety with com-
plete ¢delity, only if every person transfers all the power they possess to
society, and society alone retains the supreme natural right over all
things, i.e., supreme power, which all must obey, either of their own free
will or through fear of the ultimate punishment. The right of such a
society is called democracy. Democracy therefore is properly de¢ned as a
united gathering of people which collectively has the sovereign right to
do all that it has the power to do. It follows that sovereign power is
bound by no law and everyone is obliged to obey it in all things. For they
must all have made this agreement, tacitly or explicitly, when they
transferred their whole power of defending themselves, that is, their
whole right, to the sovereign authority. If they had wanted to keep any
right for themselves, they should have made this provision at the same
time as they could have safely defended it. Since they did not do so, and
could not have done it without dividing and therefore destroying its
authority, by that very fact they have submitted themselves to the sover-
eign’s will. They have done so without reservation (as we have already
shown), compelled as they were by necessity and guided by reason. It
follows that unless we wish to
194
be enemies of government and to act
against reason, which urges us to defend the government with all our
strength, we are obliged to carry out absolutely all the commands of the
sovereign power, however absurd they may be. Reason too bids us do so:
it is a choice of the lesser of two evils.
[
9] It was not di⁄cult, moreover, for each person to take this risk of
submitting himself absolutely to the power and will of another. For sover-
eigns, we showed, retain the right to command whatever they wish only so
long as they truly hold supreme power. If they lose it, they at the same time
also lose the right of decreeing all things, which passes to the man or men
who have acquired it and can retain it.This is why it can very rarely happen
that sovereigns issue totally absurd commands. To protect their position
and retain power, they are very much obliged to work for the common
good and direct all things by the dictate of reason; for no one has main-
tained a violent government for long, as Seneca says.
5
Furthermore, there
is less reason in a democratic state to fear absurd proceedings. For it is
5
Seneca, TheTrojan Women,
258^9.
Theological-Political Treatise
200




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə