Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə85/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   ...   114

almost impossible that the majority of a large assembly would agree on the
same irrational decision. In addition, there is its foundation and purpose
which is precisely, as we have also shown, to avoid the follies of appetite and
as much as possible to bring men within the limits of reason, so that they
may dwell in peace and harmony. Without this foundation, the whole
structure soon disintegrates. It is the duty of the sovereign alone to provide
for these things, and it is the subjects’duty, as we have said, to carry out its
command, and acknowledge no law other than what the highest power
proclaims as law.
[
10] Perhaps someone will think that in this way we are turning sub-
jects into slaves, supposing a slave to be someone who acts on command,
and a free person to be one who behaves as he pleases. But this is not
true at all. In fact, anyone who is guided by their own pleasure in this
way and cannot see or do what is good for them, is him or herself very
much a slave. The only [genuinely] free person is one who lives with his
entire mind guided solely by reason. Acting on command, that is, from
obedience, does take away liberty in some sense, but it is not acting on
command in itself that makes someone a slave, but rather the reason for
so acting. If the purpose of the action is not his own advantage but that
of the ruler, then the agent is indeed a slave and useless to himself. But
in a state and government where the safety of the whole people, not that
of the ruler, is the supreme law,
6
he who
195
obeys the sovereign in all things
should not be called a slave useless to himself but rather a subject. The
freest state, therefore, is that whose laws are founded on sound reason;
for there each man can be free whenever he wishes,
7
that is, he can live
under the guidance of reason with his whole mind. Similarly, though
children are obliged to obey all their parents’ commands, they are none-
theless not slaves, since a parent’s commands are mostly directed to the
good of the children. We thus recognize a vast di¡erence between a slave,
a child and a subject, and we distinguish them on these grounds as fol-
lows. A slave is someone obliged to obey commands from a master which
look only to the advantage of the master; a child is one who at the com-
mand of a parent does what is advantageous for himself; and a subject
is one who does by command of the sovereign what is useful for the
community and consequently also for himself.
6
Cicero, On the Laws,
3.3.8.
7
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
33.
Foundations of the state
201


[
11] With this, I think, the fundamentals of the democratic republic
are made su⁄ciently clear, this being the form of state I chose to discuss
¢rst, because it seems to be the most natural and to be that which
approaches most closely to the freedom nature bestows on every person.
In a democracy no one transfers their natural right to another in such a way
that they are not thereafter consulted but rather to the majority of the whole
society of which they are a part. In this way all remain equal as they had been
previously, in the state of nature. Also, this is the only form of government
that I want to discuss explicitly, since it is the most relevant to my design, my
purpose being to discuss the advantage of liberty in a state. Accordingly,
I disregard the foundations of the other forms of government. To under-
stand their right, we do not need now to know how they have arisen and
often still arise, since that is clear enough from what we have just proved.
Whether the holder of sovereign power is one or a few or all, indubitably the
supreme right of commanding whatever they wish belongs to him or them.
Besides, anyone who has transferred their power of defending themselves to
another, whether freely or under compulsion, has clearly surrendered his
natural right and has consequently decided to obey the other absolutely, in
all things; and they are wholly obligated to do so as long as the king, nobility,
or people preserves the supreme power they received, given that this was the
ground for the transfer of jurisdiction.We do not need to say more.
[
12] Now that we have established the foundations and right of the state,
it will be easy to show what, in the civil
196
state, is the civil right of the citizen,
what an o¡ence is and what justice and injustice are; we can also readily
explain who is an ally, who an enemy, and what the crime of treason is.
[
13] We can mean nothing by the civil right of the citizen other than the
freedom of each person to conserve themselves in their own condition,
which is determined by the edicts of the sovereign power and protected by
its authority alone. For as soon as someone has transferred to another their
right to live by their own free will as determined solely by their own
authority, that is, once they have transferred their liberty and their power to
defend themselves, they must live solely by the judgment of the other and
be defended exclusively by his forces.
[
14] An o¡ence is committed when a citizen or subject is compelled by
another person to su¡er a loss, contrary to the civil law or the edict of the
Theological-Political Treatise
202


sovereign; for an o¡ence can be conceived as occurring only in the civil
state. No o¡ence can be committed against subjects by sovereigns, since
they are of right permitted to do all things, and therefore o¡ences occur
only between private persons obliged by law not to harm one another.
[
15] Justice is a ¢xed intention to assign to each person what belongs to
them
8
in accordance with civil law. Injustice is to take away from some-
one, on a pretext of right, what belongs to them by a correct interpreta-
tion of the laws. Justice and injustice are also called equity and inequity,
because those who are appointed to settle legal disputes are obliged to
have no respect of persons, but to treat all as equal, and equally to defend
the right of each individual, not begrudging the rich or despising the
poor.
9
[
16] Allies are members of two states who, to avoid the danger of a war or
for any other advantage, make a mutual agreement not to harm one
another, and to give assistance to each other when need arises, while each
side retains its own independence. This agreement will be valid as long as
its foundation, the source of the danger or advantage, persists. No one
makes an agreement, and no one is obligated to honour a pact, except in
the hope of some good or apprehension of some adverse consequence.
When this ground is removed, the agreement automatically lapses.
Experience very clearly con¢rms this. For while di¡erent governments
make compacts between themselves not to harm each other, they also
strive so far as possible to prevent the other outstripping them in power.
They do not trust the other’s word unless they see very clearly the interest
and advantage for both parties in making the agreement. Otherwise they
fear being deceived, and not without reason. For who will acquiesce in the
words and promises of one who holds sovereign
197
power and has the right to
do anything he wishes, whose highest law must be the security and advan-
tage of his own rule, unless he is a fool who is ignorant of the right of
sovereigns? Besides if we take piety and religion into account, we shall also
see that it is criminal for anyone who holds power to keep their promises if
this involves loss of their power. For they cannot ful¢l any promise which
they see will result in loss of their power, without betraying the pledge that
8
Justinian, Institutes,
1.1.
9
Equality is the essential principle of justice, for Spinoza, but also of his (secularized) moral
philosophy and of what he regards as the best kind of state, namely democracy.
Foundations of the state
203




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə