Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə86/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   ...   114

they gave to their subjects. This pledge is their highest obligation, and
sovereigns normally swear the most solemn oaths to uphold it.
[
17] An enemy is someone who lives outside a state in the sense that he
does not recognize the authority of the state either as its ally or as its sub-
ject. For it is not hatred but right that de¢nes an enemy of a state’s
authority, and a state’s right against someone who does not recognize its
authority by any agreement is the same as its right against someone who
actively damages it. It has the right to compel him either to surrender or to
enter into an alliance by whatever means it can.
[
18] Finally, the crime of treason occurs only among subjects or citizens
who by a tacit or express agreement have transferred all their power to a
state. A subject is said to have committed such a crime if he has attempted
to seize the right of supreme power in some way or to transfer it to some-
one else. I say ‘has attempted’, for if it were the case that such persons could
only be condemned after the deed was done, a state would generally be
seeking to do this too late, after its right had been seized or transferred to
someone else. I am speaking of anyone, I emphasize again, who by what-
ever means attempts to seize the right of supreme power. I do not accept
that it makes any di¡erence whether the state as a whole would lose or gain
even in the most obvious way from it. For whatever reason anyone makes
this attempt, he has done injury to the majesty
10
of the state and it is right
to condemn him, just as everyone admits it is perfectly right to do in war-
fare. Any soldier who does not stay where he is posted, but attacks the
enemy without his commander’s knowledge, even if his tactics are good
and he succeeds in driving the enemy o¡ while yet still doing so as a per-
sonal venture of his own, is rightly condemned to death, since he has vio-
lated his oath and the right of his commander. Not everyone sees with
equal clarity that all citizens, without exception, are equally always bound
by this right, but the reasoning remains absolutely the same. For the state
must be protected and directed by the counsel of the sovereign power only
and all have agreed without reservation that this right belongs to him
alone. Should anyone, therefore, by his own decision and without the
knowledge of the sovereign power, seek to carry out a public negotiation,
10
‘majestatem laesit’ picks up the phrase ‘crimen laesae majestatis’, translated ‘crime of treason’
above.
Theological-Political Treatise
204


even if the state would certainly gain from
198
it, they have, as we have said,
violated the right of the sovereign power and harmed its majesty, and are
thus deservedly condemned.
[
19] It remains, so as to remove every last scruple, to answer the
question whether what we said above namely, that everyone who does not
have the use of reason lives in a state of nature by the laws of his desire,
and that this is a sovereign natural right, does not directly con£ict with
revealed divine law. For every person without exception (whether they
have the use of reason or not) is equally obliged by divine command to
love their neighbour as themselves, and therefore we cannot do harm to
another person without doing wrong and living by the laws of appetite alone.
We can easily deal with this objection simply by examining the state of
nature more closely. For this is prior to religion both by nature, and in
time. No one knows from nature
11
that he is bound by obedience
towards God. Indeed, he cannot discover this by reasoning either; he can
only receive it from a revelation con¢rmed by miracles. Hence, prior to a
revelation, no one is obligated by divine law, which he simply cannot
know. The state of nature is not to be confused with the state of religion,
but must be conceived apart from religion and law, and consequently
apart from all sin and wrongdoing. This is how we have conceived it, and
have con¢rmed this by the authority of Paul. It is not only owing to this
ignorance that we consider the state of nature to be prior to revealed
divine law and apart from it, but also because of the freedom in which all
men are born. For if men were bound by nature to the divine law, or if
the divine law were a law of nature, it would be super£uous for God to
enter into a covenant with men and bind them with an oath. We must
therefore admit unreservedly that divine law began from the time when
men promised to obey God in all things by an explicit agreement. With
this agreement they surrendered their natural liberty, so to speak, trans-
ferring their right to God, and this, as we have said, occurred in the civil
state. I will discuss this more fully in the following chapters.
[
20] But it may still be urged that sovereign powers, like subjects, are
equally bound by this divine law, despite the fact that they retain, as we
said, the natural right and are [in that respect] permitted to do anything.
11
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
34.
Foundations of the state
205


This di⁄culty arises not so much from the notion of the state of nature
as from that of natural right. To remove it completely, I maintain that in
the state of nature everyone should live by the revealed law for the same
reason as they ought to live by the dictates of sound judgment, and that
is because it is advantageous to
199
them and essential to their security. They
may refuse to do so if they wish, but they do this at their own peril.
Everyone is therefore obliged to live solely by their own decisions and
not by someone else’s, and they are not bound to acknowledge anyone as
judge or as the rightful defender of religion. I a⁄rm that the sovereign
has retained this right. While he may consult advisors, he is not obliged
to recognize anyone as judge or any mortal except himself as defender of
any right, other than a prophet expressly sent by God who has proved
this by incontrovertible signs. Even then it is not a man whom he is
compelled to recognize as judge but rather God himself. Should the
sovereign refuse to obey God in his revealed law, he may do so, but at his
own peril and to his own loss. No civil or natural law forbids him. For
the civil law derives solely from his own decree, while natural right
derives from the laws of nature, and the laws of nature are not accom-
modated to religion, which is concerned solely with human good, but to
the order of universal nature, that is, to the eternal decree of God, which
is unknown to us. Others seem to have conceived a rather obscure notion
of this, in saying that man can sin against the revealed will of God, but
not against his eternal decree by which he predestined all things.
[
21] One may also inquire: what if the sovereign commands something
which is against religion and the obedience which we have promised to
God by an explicit agreement? Should we obey the divine or the human
commandment? I shall discuss this at greater length in later chapters.
Here I will just say brie£y that we must above all obey God when we have a
certain and undoubted revelation but that people are very prone to go
astray in religion and make many dubious claims that result from the
diversity of their understanding, and generate serious con£ict, as experi-
ence clearly testi¢es. It is therefore certain that if no one were obliged by
law to obey the sovereign power in matters that he thinks belong to reli-
gion, then the law of the state would depend upon the di¡erent judgments
and passions of each individual person. For no one would be obligated by
the law if he considered it to be directed against his faith and superstition,
and on this pretext everyone would be able to claim licence to do anything.
Theological-Political Treatise
206




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə