Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə93/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   ...   114

cheerfulness, not to do whatever they pleased but obey God with all their
hearts. Three times in the year they feasted with God (see Deuteronomy
16); they had to cease from all work on the seventh day of the week and
allow themselves to rest; and, besides these, other times were designated
when honest enjoyment and feasting were not so much allowed as pre-
scribed. I do not think anything can be devised which is more e¡ective than
this for swaying men’s minds. Nothing captivates minds more e¡ectively
than the cheerfulness arising from devotion, i.e., from love and wonder
together. They were unlikely to become
217
bored with it all through famil-
iarity, as the worship reserved for festival days was exceptional and varied.
On top of this, there was the supreme reverence for the Temple they
always scrupulously kept up owing to its unique cult and rituals that wor-
shippers were required to perform before being allowed to enter. Even
today they cannot read, without a shudder of horror, of the scandalous act
of Manasseh in daring to place an idol in the Temple itself.
16
The people
felt no less reverence for the laws kept with religious care within the
innermost sanctum. Popular prejudices and murmuring hardly posed a
threat here, since no one dared o¡er a judgment about divine questions.
They had to do whatever they were commanded by the authority of the
divine response received in the Temple or via the Law delivered by God
without consulting reason. I have now, I think, explained brie£y but clearly
the essential design of this state.
[
26] It remains now to inquire into why the Hebrews so often lapsed
from the Law, why they were so often overrun, and why in the end their
state could be utterly destroyed. Perhaps someone will assert at this point
that it happened due to the wilful disobedience of this people. But this is
childish. How was this nation more disobedient than others? Was it by
nature? Nature certainly does not create peoples, individuals do, and
individuals are only separated into nations by di¡erences of language, law
and morality. It can only be from these latter factors, namely law and
morality, that each nation has its unique character, its unique condition,
and its unique prejudices. If therefore one had to grant that the Hebrews
were more wilfully disobedient than other people, this would have to be
imputed to a fault in its laws or in their morality. The truth is that had
God wished their state to last longer, He would have organized their
16
2 Kings 21.1^9.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
225


rights and laws di¡erently and instituted a di¡erent form of state. What
else can be said, then, than that their God was angry with them not
merely, as Jeremiah
32.31 says, from the foundation of the city but right
from the laying down of the Laws. Ezekiel too attests to this at
20.25
saying, ‘I also gave them statutes which were not good and edicts by
which they might not live; I made them impure by their very gifts by
rejecting every ¢rst opening of the womb’ (i.e., the ¢rst-born), ‘so that
I might destroy them, so that they would know that I am Jehovah’.
So as to understand these words
218
and the cause of the destruction of
the state, one should note that the original intention was to entrust the
sacred ministry to the ¢rst-born, and not to the Levites (see Numbers
8.17). But after everyone but the Levites had worshipped the golden calf,
the ¢rst-born were rejected and declared unclean and the Levites chosen
in their place (Deuteronomy
10.8). The more I ponder this, the more
I must exclaim, in Tacitus’ words, that at that time ‘God did not wish to
save them but to punish them’.
17
Nor can I su⁄ciently express my
amazement that there was so much anger in the divine mind,
18
that He
should actually make laws (which are normally designed to protect the
honour, safety and security of all the people) to avenge himself and
punish them, and thus the laws seemed to be not laws (i.e., a protection
for the people) but penalties and punishments. Everything always
reminded them of their impurity and rejection: all the gifts they were
obliged to donate to the Levites and the priests, their obligation to
redeem their ¢rst-born and pay a poll-tax in silver to the Levites, the
exclusive privilege of the Levites to approach whatever was sacred.
Furthermore, the Levites always gave them opportunities for criticism.
For undoubtedly, among so many thousands of Levites, there must have
been numerous narrow-minded clerics who made a nuisance of them-
selves. In retaliation, the people kept an eye on the activities of the Levites
who, after all, were only men, and would blame them all for the misdeeds
of just a few: that is the way of things. Thus, there would constantly be
protests ^ especially if the price of corn was high ^ and unwillingness to
continue supporting a non-labouring elite whom they resented and were
not even related to them by blood.What wonder, then, if in times of peace
when manifest miracles had ceased and there were no men of outstanding
authority, people became indignant and envious, and began to grow stale
17
Tacitus, Histories,
1.3.
18
An echo of Virgil, Aeneid,
1.11: ‘tantaene animis coelestibus irae?’
Theological-Political Treatise
226


in their worship which, though divine, was demeaning to them as well as
suspect in itself, and if they looked around for a new cult.What wonder too
if the leaders, who always alone hold the sovereign right to rule, gave in to
the people and introduced new cults, in order to win their allegiance for
themselves and turn them away from the priests.
[
27] But if their republic had been set up according to its ¢rst design,
all the tribes would have retained equal right and honour, and everything
would have proceeded in complete security. For who would wish to vio-
late the sacred right of his kin? What would they want more than to
support those of their own blood, their brothers and parents, as religious
piety required? What would they have wanted more than to learn from
them how to interpret the Law and hear
219
from them the divine respon-
ses? In this way, all the tribes would have remained far more closely
bound to each other, that is, if all had had an equal right to administer
the sacred things. Indeed, there would have been nothing to fear had His
choosing the Levites had any other cause than anger and vengeance. But
as we said, God was angry, and he made them impure by their gifts, to
repeat again the words of Ezekiel, by rejecting the ¢rst opening of the
womb in order to destroy them.
[
28] This is con¢rmed by the histories. No sooner had the people, still
in the desert, found they had some time to spare, than many of them
(not from the common folk) began to resent this priestly election and to
foment the view that Moses was setting up these institutions not by
divine command but simply as he pleased, since he had chosen his own
tribe over the others and conferred the right of priesthood for ever on
his own brother. So they instigated a commotion and went to see him,
claiming they were all equally sacred and that it was not right that he
should be elevated above all the rest.
19
Nor was there any way that he
could pacify them; however, via a miracle which he invoked as a token of
his high standing with God, they were all annihilated. From this arose a
new and more general sedition of the whole people; for the people
believed that those men had been destroyed not by God who was their
judge but rather by the craft of Moses. He did not ¢nally subdue them
until a terrible disaster, that is a pestilence, left them so worn down that
19
Numbers
16.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
227




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə