Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə94/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   ...   114

they preferred to die rather than to live. It was thus at that time more a
case of sedition lapsing than of harmony being established. Scripture
testi¢es to this at Deuteronomy
31.21, where God assures Moses, after
predicting that after the latter’s death the people would lapse from the
worship of God: ‘I know what they want and what they are plotting today,
while I have not yet brought them to the land that I swore to give them’.
A little later Moses directly addressed the people: ‘I know your rebellion
and your disobedience. If while I have lived among you, you have been
unruly against God, how much more will you be so after my death?’
20
[
29] Actually, this is what was to happen, as is well known. Great
changes occurred, voluptuousness, luxury and idleness surged up among
them, and everything deteriorated, until, after being conquered many
times, they openly violated the divine Law and demanded to have a man
as their king; and thus the chief edi¢ce of the state was no longer the
Temple but a royal court, and all the tribes were no longer fellow citizens
under the divine law and the priesthood but under kings. This was a
major cause of further subversion, which in the end brought about the
fall of the entire state. For what could be more insupportable to kings than
to reign on su¡erance, or have to put
220
up with a state within the state?
The earliest kings, selected from among private men were content with
the degree of dignity conferred upon them. But once their sons obtained the
kingship by right of succession, they gradually began to change everything,
so as to possess the entire power of the state for themselves which, for the
most part, they lacked as long as the authority of the Laws depended not on
them but on the high priest, who kept the Laws in the sanctuary and inter-
preted these to the people. Like their subjects, they were bound by the Laws,
and had no right to repeal them, or make new ones carrying similar
authority. The right of the Levites forbade kings, as secular persons, no less
than their subjects, from handling sacred matters. And, lastly, they sought
more power because the whole security of their government was dependent
on the will of one man who was regarded as a prophet. Of this dependence
they had seen ample proof in the example of Samuel who, with great liberty
gave Saul his orders and, afterwards, was easily able, owing to one fault of
Saul’s, to transfer his authority to rule to David. In this way they faced a
government within a government, holding their title on su¡erance.
20
Deuteronomy
31.27.
Theological-Political Treatise
228


To ove rc o me this , they p e r mitte d te mple s to b e de dic ate d to othe r go ds ,
s o that the re migh t b e no mo re c onsult at ion of the Levite s. The n, they
s ough t out m ore me n to prophe sy in the name of Go d, s o a s to have other
prophe ts to c ou n te r the ve r it able on e s. But whateve r they tr i e d, they we re
n eve r able to o bt ain what they wan te d. The tr ue prophe ts we re re ady for
eve r ything. They awaite d the opp or tun e m o me n t which is the re ig n of a
new king, s omething always precarious whilst recollection of the previous
king remains strong. At such a moment they could easily instigate against
the new king, on divine authority, a rival well-known for his courage to vin-
dicate the divine law and take over the government or his part of it by right.
But eve n the prophe ts c ould not b r ing ab out any tr ue i mprove me n t by
this me ans. For eve n if they de p o s e d a tyran t , the c aus e s of tyranny st ill
re main e d, and s o all they achi eve d wa s to b r ing in a n ew tyran t at the
exp e ns e of much c it i z e ns’ blo o d. Cons e que n tly, the re wa s no e nd to str ife
and c ivil war, and the re a s ons why the divine law wa s violate d re main e d
always the s ame ; the s e rea s ons c ould only b e re m ove d by ove r throwing the
st ate e n t irely.
[
30] With this we have s e e n how religion wa s in troduce d in to the
Heb rew republic and how the latte r c ould have c on t inue d for eve r if the
just ange r of the Law- g ive r had p e r mitte d it to c on t inue in the s ame way.
But this c ould not b e and he nce it had to p e r ish. He re I have b e e n
speaking only about the ¢rst state, for the second was scarcely a shadow
of the ¢rst, since by that time they were
221
bound by the law of the Persians
whose subjects they were, and after they obtained their freedom, the
high priests usurped the right of leadership and obtained absolute con-
trol of the state. Consequently, the high priests aspired to possess both
government and priesthood together, and this is why there has been no
n e e d to s ay m ore ab out this s e c ond Co m m onwe alth. The 
n ext chapte rs
will show whether the ¢rst state is as imitable as we think it to have been
durable, or whether it is pious to imitate it, so far as this can be done.
[
31] Finally, I should just like to repeat the statement we made above,
that what we have shown in this chapter demonstrates that divine law, or
the law of religion, arises from a covenant, and without a covenant there is
no law but the law of nature. It follows that by the ties of religion the
Hebrews were bound in piety only towards their fellow citizens and not
towards the nations who were not party to the Covenant.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
229


chapter 18
Some political principles are inferred from the
Hebrew state and its history
[
1] The Hebrew state, as we analysed it in the
last chapter
, might have
lasted for ever, but no one can now imitate it, and it would not be wise
to try to do so. For if anyone wished to transfer their right to God, they
would have to make an explicit covenant with God, just as the Hebrews
did, and this would require not only the will of those who were trans-
ferring their right, but also the will of God to whom it was to be
transferred. But God has revealed through the Apostles that His cove-
nant is no longer written in ink or on stone tablets but rather on the
heart by the spirit of God.
1
Moreover, such a form of state would
probably only be useful to those desirous of living without interacting
with others, shutting themselves up within their own borders and
separating themselves from the rest of the world, but not to those who
need to have commerce with others. There are very few who would ¢nd
such a form of state advantageous to them. Yet though it cannot be
emulated as a whole, it nevertheless has numerous features that are at
least well worth noticing, and which it would perhaps be very wise to
imitate.
[
2] Since, as I said above, it is not my intention to discuss the state
systematically, I will leave out a great many things and specify only what
is relevant to my purpose. First,
222
it is not contrary to God’s rule to choose
a supreme magistrate who will have the sovereign right of government.
After the Hebrews transferred their right to God, they handed over the
1
2 Corinthians 3.3.
230




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə