Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə97/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   ...   114

less can it be assigned to men unable to foretell the future or work miracles.
But I will discuss this formally in the
next chapter
.
(
4) Finally, we see how disastrous it is for a people unaccustomed to live under
kings and already possessing settled laws, to appoint a monarch. For the
people will be unable to endure so powerful an authority, while the royal
majesty will ¢nd equally insupportable the laws or rights of the people,
introduced as they were by an authority lower than its own. Still less will the
monarch be inclined to defend these laws, especially since when they were ¢rst
introduced no doctrine of kingship applied, but only of the council or popular
assembly which regarded itself as holding power. Hence, when defending their
ancient rights, the king would appear to be the people’s servant rather than its
master. A new monarch will put all his e¡orts into making new laws and
transforming the powers of the state to his own advantage and reducing the
people to the point where they cannot take the king’s position away as easily
as they gave it to him.
[
7] But I cannot fail to say here that it is equally dangerous to depose a
monarch, even if it is clear by every criterion that he is a tyrant. A people
accustomed to royal authority and held in check only by it, will despise any
lesser authority and hold it in contempt. Accordingly, if they depose a
king, it will be as indispensable for them, as for the prophets in the past, to
select another monarch in place of the previous one, and he will then be a
tyrant, not of his own choosing but of necessity. For how will he inevitably
regard citizens whose hands are stained with royal blood, citizens glorying
in parricide as in a noble act, an act which cannot fail to be an ominous
example for him? If he wishes to be king and refuses to accept the people
as a judge of kings, and his master, and if he is not to reign at their plea-
sure, he must certainly avenge the death
227
of his predecessor and provide a
counter-example for his own sake, so that the people will not commit the
same crime again. It will not, however, be easy to avenge the death of a
tyrant by killing citizens, without at the same time defending the cause of
the former tyrant, approving his actions and following in all his footsteps.
This is why a people have often been able to change tyrants but are never
able to get rid of them or change the monarchical form into another form
of state.
[
8] The English people have provided a fatal example of this truth.
They looked for reasons that would seem to justify their deposing their
The Hebrew state and its history
235


monarch.
5
But once they had deposed him, they could do no less than
change their form of state. However, after spilling a great deal of blood,
they succeeded merely in installing a new monarch
6
with a di¡erent title
(as if the whole thing had been about nothing but a title). The new ruler
could remain in power only by destroying the entire royal line, and by
killing the friends of the king or those suspected of his friendship, and
starting a war in order to put an end to the inactivity of peaceful times,
which a¡ords an opportunity for murmurings of discontent to arise. He
contrived to turn the thoughts of the common people away from the
execution of the king by keeping them intent and occupied with new
challenges.
7
By the time the people realized that they had done nothing
for the safety of their country except violate the right of a legitimate king
and change everything for the worse, it was too late [to correct the
damage]. Consequently, as soon as they had the chance, they decided to
retrace their steps, and did not rest until they saw everything restored to
its former state.
[
9] Someone may perhaps put forward the example of the Romans to
show that a people can easily remove a tyrant from their midst. But
actually I think that this example fully con¢rms our position. Admit-
tedly, the Roman people could much more easily get rid of a tyrant and
change their form of government [than the English], with the right of
choosing the king and his successor residing in the hands of the peo-
ple, and they themselves (a notoriously rebellious populace) not yet
having learned to obey kings. Indeed, of the six kings they had in ear-
lier times, they slaughtered three. Yet all they achieved thereby was to
choose many tyrants in place of one, and these kept them in ceaseless
wretched strife in foreign and civil wars until ¢nally, the form of state
once again became monarchical except only, as in the case of England,
for the change of name.
[
10] As for the States of Holland, they did not, to our knowledge, ever
have kings but only Counts, to whom the right of government was never
5
Spinoza is referring to the English Civil War and the dethroning of King Charles I (reigned:
1625^49).
6
I.e. Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England.
7
Spinoza is referring here to the First Anglo-Dutch War (
1652^4) which he is suggesting Cromwell
started in order to distract the attention of the English from their internal politics.
Theological-Political Treatise
236


transferred. For as the sovereign
228
States of Holland publicly state, in the
resolution published by them in the time of the Earl of Leicester,
8
they
had always reserved to themselves the authority to remind these Counts
of their duty, retaining the power to defend their authority and the liberty
of the citizens, and rescue themselves from them should they become
tyrants, and generally keep a check on them, so that they could do
nothing without the permission and approval of the States. The right of
sovereignty, it follows, was always vested in the States. This was what the
last Count of Holland [i.e. Philip II of Spain] strove to usurp. Hence it is
by no means true that they rebelled against him when they recovered
their original power which they had by then almost lost. These examples
thus con¢rm what we have said, namely, that the form of each state must
necessarily be retained and cannot be changed without risking the total
ruin of the state. These are the points that I thought worth noticing here.
8
Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester (
1533^88), was sent over by Queen Elizabeth and accepted by the
Dutch as ‘governor-general’ of the United Provinces, a position which he held during the years
1585^7.
The Hebrew state and its history
237




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə