Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə99/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   ...   114

that as soon as the Hebrews transferred their right to the king of
Babylon, the kingdom of God and the divine law immediately ceased to
be e¡ective. For, by that very fact, the covenant with which they under-
took to obey everything that God
231
ordained, and which had been the
foundation of the kingdom of God, was utterly abolished. They could no
longer continue to observe it since from that moment onwards they were
no longer under their own jurisdiction (as when they were in the desert
or in their own country) but under that of the Babylonian ruler whom
they were obliged to obey in everything (as we showed in chapter
16
).
This is also what Jeremiah expressly teaches at chapter
29.7: ‘Strive’, he
says,‘for the peace of the state, to which I have brought you as captives;
for its well-being will be your well-being’. They could not strive for the
salvation of that state as participants in government do, being captives,
but rather had to as slaves do. This meant observing the ordinances and
laws of the state, even though they were very di¡erent from those to
which they had been accustomed in their own country and being obe-
dient in everything, so as to obviate all cause of sedition.
It most evidently follows from all of this that religion among the
Hebrews assumed the force of law only from the authority of the state, and
when this was obliterated, religion could no longer be regarded as the
prescription of a particular state but as a universal religion of reason. I say
‘of reason’ because the universal religion was not yet known by revelation.
[
7] We conclude, therefore, absolutely, that religion, whether revealed by
the natural light of reason or by prophetic light, receives the force of a
commandment solely from the decree of those who have authority to gov-
ern, and that God has no special kingdom over men except through those
who hold power.
[
8] This follows also from what we said in chapter
4
and is further
clari¢ed by it. We proved there that all God’s decrees involve eternal
truth and necessity, and God cannot be conceived as a prince or legis-
lator enacting laws for men. For this reason divine teachings, whether
revealed by natural or by prophetic light, necessarily acquire the force of
a decree not directly from God, but from those who exercise the right of
governing and issue edicts or by their mediation. Hence, we can only
conceive of God ruling over men and directing human a¡airs in accor-
dance with justice and equity as e¡ected by their mediation. This is also
Sovereign powers and religion
241


con¢rmed by experience itself. For we ¢nd no traces of divine justice
except where just men rule. Elsewhere, to use Solomon’s words once
again,
3
we see the same chance a¡ecting the just and the unjust, pure
and impure, which has rendered many people doubtful concerning
divine providence, since they thought God ruled over men directly and
directed the whole of nature for their bene¢t.
[
9] It is clear from both
232
experience and reason, then, that divine law
depends solely upon the decree of the sovereign authorities, and hence
also that they are its interpreters. We shall now see how they do this. For
it is time to demonstrate that external religious worship and every
expression of piety must, if we wish to obey God rightly, be consistent
with the stability and conservation of the commonwealth. With this
proven, we shall easily be able to understand why sovereign authorities
are the [sole] interpreters of religion and piety.
[
10] It is certain that piety towards one’s country is the highest piety
that anyone can show, for if the state is dissolved, nothing good can exist;
everything is put in danger; anger and impiety are the only powers, and
everyone is terri¢ed. It follows that any pious act that one can perform
for a neighbour becomes impious if it entails harm to the whole state,
and, conversely, there can be no impious act against a neighbour which is
not to be deemed pious if done for the preservation of the state. It is
pious, for instance, if I hand over my cloak to someone who is in dispute
with me and aspires to take my tunic, also.
4
But in a situation where this
is judged prejudicial to the preservation of the commonwealth, the pious
thing, rather, is to bring him before a court, even if he will be con-
demned to death. This is why Manlius Torquatus is celebrated because he
valued the safety of the people more than piety towards his son.
5
Given
this, it follows that the people’s safety is the supreme law
6
to which all
other laws both human and divine must be accommodated. However,
it is the duty of the sovereign authority alone to determine what is
necessary for the security of the whole people and of the state, and lay
down what it deems necessary. It follows that it is also the duty of the
sovereign authority alone to lay down how a person should behave with
3
Ecclesiastes
9.2.
4
Matthew
5.40, Luke 6.29.
5
See Livy, History of Rome,
8.6^7.
6
Cicero, On the Laws,
3.3.
Theological-Political Treatise
242


piety towards their neighbour, that is, to determine how one is obliged to
obey God.
[
11] From this, it emerges very evidently in what sense the sovereign
authorities are interpreters of religion; we also understand that no one
can rightly obey God, if they do not adapt pious observance to which
everyone is bound, to the public interest, and if, as a consequence, they
do not obey all the decrees of the sovereign power. For we are obliged by
God’s decree to treat with piety all persons, without exception and in£ict
harm on no one. Accordingly, no one
233
is permitted to give assistance to
anyone who seeks to cause loss to another, much less to the whole state.
Hence, no one can behave piously toward his neighbour according to
God’s decree, unless he accommodates piety and religion to the public
interest. But no private person can know what is in the interest of the
state other than from the decrees of the sovereign authorities, who alone
have the responsibility to transact public business. Consequently, no one
can rightly cultivate piety or obey God, without obeying all edicts of
the sovereign authority.
[
12] This is likewise con¢rmed in practice. No subject is permitted to
aid anyone whom the sovereign authorities have condemned to death or
declared an enemy [of the state], whether a citizen or a foreigner, a pri-
vate man or a ruler of another state. Although the Hebrews were com-
manded that everyone should love his neighbour as himself (see
Leviticus
19.17^18), they were still obliged to denounce to a judge any-
one who committed an o¡ence against the stipulations of the Law (see
Leviticus
5.1 and Deuteronomy 13.8^9) and slaughter that person if
condemned to death (see Deuteronomy
17.7). Equally, it was necessary for
the Hebrews, as we showed in chapter
17
, to accommodate their religion
uniquely to their state and separate themselves from all other peoples so
as conserve the liberty they had acquired and retain absolute dominion
of the lands they had occupied. They were thus admonished: ‘Love your
neighbour and hate your enemy’ (see Matthew
5.43). Again, after they
had lost their state and been taken captive to Babylon, Jeremiah taught
them that they should strive for the well-being of the country into which
they had been brought captive. Later, when Christ saw that they were
going to be scattered throughout the whole world, he taught them to
cultivate piety towards all men without distinction. All of this most
Sovereign powers and religion
243




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə