Biogeosciences Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review



Yüklə 0,96 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə17/37
tarix06.05.2018
ölçüsü0,96 Mb.
#42203
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   37

I. Siokou-Frangou et al.: Mediterranean plankton

1563


Fig. 16. Spatial distribution of total mesozooplankton abundance (black circles) or total copepod abundance

(open circles) (

10

4

×



ind. m

2



) in spring time in the 0–200 layer of MS. Sources: Benovic et al., 2005 (Adri-

atic Sea); Christou et al., 1998 (South of Crete, Rhodos gyre); Fern´andez de Puelles et al., 2004 (0–100 m

layer, Balearic Islands); Gaudy and Champalbert, 1998 (Gulf of Lion); Mazzocchi et al., 2003 (Ionian Sea);

Mazzocchi, unpublished data (North Balearic Sea); Pasternak et al., 2005 (0–150 m layer, Cyprus Eddy); Pinca

and Dallot, 1995 (Ligurian Sea); Porumb and Onciu, 2006 (offshore Lybia); Saiz et al., 1999 (Catalan Sea);

Scotto di Carlo et al., 1984 (Tyrrhenian Sea); Seguin et al., 1994 (Alboran Sea); Siokou-Frangou, unpublished

data (Aegean Sea); Zakaria, 2006 (0–100 m layer, offshore Egypt).

89

Fig. 16.

Spatial distribution of total mesozooplankton abun-

dance (black circles) or total copepod abundance (open circles)

(10

4

×



ind. m

2



) in spring time in the 0–200 layer of MS. Sources:

Benovi´c et al., 2005 (Adriatic Sea); Christou et al., 1998 (South of

Crete, Rhodos gyre); Fern´andez de Puelles et al., 2004 (0–100 m

layer, Balearic Islands); Gaudy and Champalbert, 1998 (Gulf of

Lion); Mazzocchi et al., 2003 (Ionian Sea); Mazzocchi, unpub-

lished data (North Balearic Sea); Pasternak et al., 2005 (0–150 m

layer, Cyprus Eddy); Pinca and Dallot, 1995 (Ligurian Sea); Po-

rumb and Onciu, 2006 (offshore Lybia); Saiz et al., 1999 (Catalan

Sea); Scotto di Carlo et al., 1984 (Tyrrhenian Sea); Seguin et al.,

1994 (Alboran Sea); Siokou-Frangou, unpublished data (Aegean

Sea); Zakaria, 2006 (0–100 m layer, offshore Egypt).

a comparative study of the ciliates in the North and the South

Aegean Sea, mixotrophs contributed to total abundance from

17 to 24% in the South and from 21 to 54% in the North,

and in terms of integrated biomass the values varied from

13 to 27% and from 18 to 62% in the South and North, re-

spectively (Pitta and Giannakourou, 2000). Mixotrophs were

dominated by distinct morphotypes as well. Cells smaller

than 18 µm dominated in South Aegean Sea, whereas North

Aegean Sea, receiving the outflow of the Black Sea, pre-

sented a mixotrophic fauna characterized by a relative abun-

dance of cells of 18 to 50 µm size.

Patterns of taxonomic diversity have been investigated

with regard to tintinnid ciliates. Along a west-east MS longi-

tudinal transect sampled in June, the concentration of tintin-

nids varied little, but the number of species and genera as

well as their diversity indices increased eastward. Diversity

parameters correlated positively with the DCM depths and

negatively with the chl a concentration. In a later study, the

west-east variation of the tintinnid diversity was parallel to

shifts in the chl a size-diversity estimate (Dolan et al., 2002).

In contrast, Pitta et al. (2001) did not observe any obvious

west-east trend in tintinnid diversity but noted rather a peak

in species richness in central stations.

While the importance of microzooplankton (ciliates and

dinoflagellates) is well established in marine ecosystems

only one field study has provided estimates of ciliate growth

in the WMS (0.19–0.33 d

1

, Per´ez et al., 1997).



5

Mesozooplankton

5.1

Standing stock

An overview of the distribution of the mesozooplankton

standing stock in epipelagic Mediterranean waters highlights

a generalized scarcity and higher values in a few regions

(Fig. 16, Table 6).

Total abundance and biomass values

are comparable to those measured at the same latitudes in

the North-East Atlantic (Barquero et al., 1998; Head et al.,

2002). A west-to-east decrease of standing stock emerged

from the surveys across the basin conducted in June and

September 1999 (Dolan et al., 2002; Siokou-Frangou, 2004,

Fig. 17), and in June 2007, when mean zooplankton abun-

dance at midday in the 0–200 m layer was higher in the west-

ern (64 ind. m

3

) than in the eastern sector (32 ind. m



3

)



(Minutoli and Guglielmo, 2009). Zooplankton distribution

patterns may show high local variability, with notable spatial

changes even during the same season (Nival et al., 1975).

Sampling with finer mesh nets than the standard 200 µm,

or with large bottles, which has been rarely conducted in

the open MS, has revealed that biomass and abundance can

increase by 2 to 20 fold when the smaller metazooplank-

ters (∼50–200 µm) are considered (B¨ottger-Schnack, 1997;

Krˇsinic, 1998; Youssara and Gaudy, 2001; Andersen et al.,

2001a; Zervoudaki et al., 2006; Alcaraz et al., 2007). These

latter studies also highlight west-east differences in zoo-

plankton standing stock.

In the open MS, the bulk of epipelagic mesozooplankton is

concentrated in the upper 100 m layer and sharply decreases

below this depth (Scotto di Carlo et al., 1984; Weikert and

Trinkaus, 1990; Mazzocchi et al., 1997). It is in this upper

layer that mesozooplankton plays a major role in biologi-

cal processes, based on its linkage with phyto- and micro-

zooplankton in the euphotic zone (Longhurst and Harrison,

1989). During daytime in the stratification period, the de-

creasing vertical pattern of mesozooplankton abundance is

interrupted by a small-scale increase at the level of the DCM

(Alcaraz, 1985, 1988), where the highest abundance of nau-

plii and copepodites is reported (Sabat´es et al, 2007). At the

DCM depth, the deep zooplankton maximum (DZM) is as-

sociated with high diatom and phaeophorbide concentrations

(Latasa et al., 1992), and copepod feeding is enhanced (Saiz

and Alcaraz, 1990).

Similarly to the world ocean, the MS epipelagic layer is

enriched during the night by the diel migrants that ascend

from the mesopelagic layer (Weikert and Trinkaus, 1990;

Andersen et al., 2001b; Raybaud et al., 2008). Nevertheless,

the epipelagic mesozooplankton standing stocks do not differ

significantly between day and night (Mazzocchi et al., 1997;

Ramfos et al., 2006; Raybaud et al., 2008), due to the paucity

of long-range migrant copepod species in the MS compared

to the neighboring Atlantic Ocean (Scotto di Carlo et al.,

1984). Diel changes in zooplankton abundance are reported

at a smaller scale within the epipelagic layer, as in the case

www.biogeosciences.net/7/1543/2010/

Biogeosciences, 7, 1543–1586, 2010



Yüklə 0,96 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   37




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2024
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə