Birthday is my best accomplishment here



Yüklə 57.41 Kb.

tarix11.07.2018
ölçüsü57.41 Kb.


“Birthday is my best 

accomplishment 

here” 

Lamanto Valerio

celebrates 18

on page 2 >> 



A typical citizen

is a driver

Meet the New Zea-

land Olympiad team

page 3 >> 



Burn after reading

Something you’d

better not know 

about chemical 

weapon

page 4 >> 



№4

July 17, 2013

7.00-8.00 Breakfast

We in Russia have an idiom: when you can’t do a thing or do it with diffi culty, people will say “You’ve eaten too little porridge”. In Russian 

it sounds like “Каши мало ел” [car-she marla yell]. Guys, you’ll face a big challenge in MSU today, eat more porridge! By the way, while 

English porridge is traditionally made of oats, here in Russia we cook it with everything: rice, semolina, peas, pearl barley and millet.

8.00-9.30 Transfer 

to MSU


Spend some quality time on your way, prepare for the experimental tour. Russian students have a superstition: if you put a 5 rouble 

coin inside your shoe (under the heel), you’ll have luck at the exam. There’s no statistics on how this thing works with Olympiads

so you can check for yourself.

10.00-15.00 Experi-

mental tour, MSU

Both sides of the entrance to the faculty are marked with two statues of great Russian chemists: Mendeleev and Butlerov. Again there’s 

a superstition: touch Mendeleev’s foot to succeed in non-organic chemistry exam, for organic chemistry go touch Butlerov’s feet.

15.00-17.00 Lunch 

in MSU

There are 37 food points over the whole area of MSU, the main building alone has 5 canteens. Enjoy not only the meal, but the atmosphere of 



the place, which was designed at the time when Soviet Union was launching the fi rst spaceman Gagarin and developing nuclear energy.

17.00-18.30 Transfer 

to Circus

You’ll most probably have a chance to see the famous Moscow traffi c jams.

19.00-22.00 Circus 

Performance

You’re lucky to be visiting one of the oldest — still the coolest — circuses in Russia. In front of it there’s an unusual monument 

to a great clown Yuri Nikulin with a permanent queue to take a picture. The third superstition for today — rub his nose for luck.

22.00-23.00

Transfer to Planernoye, dinner... This is where we run out of space!



Today is gonna be the day | Catalyzer’s tips

After claiming that playing football 

is a must for every male citizen 

of El Salvador, Salvadorans took 

the fi eld and indeed showed

a great game. 

>> see page 2



Salvadorans walk the talk


Salvadorans walk the talk

“Getting 1 kg of cesium for

birthday would be pretty cool”

According to the names on T-shirts among players from Armenia, Lithuania, 

Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Poland, Venezuela and Sweden there were real 

stars: 


Alberto, Peru (№9) and Argentinian Del Grosso (№10). The fans were 

delighted to greet Real’s halfback 



Angel Di Maria (№7) who came to play, 

although very soon turned out to be an Azerbaijani 



Balagardash Bashirov. 

The  same  happened  to  the  player  named  Jesus  Christ,  on  whose  behalf, 

as it turned out, a Salvadoran 

Rodrigo Dueňas was playing. 

Catalyzer was watching Salvadorans pretty closely. The thing is the evening 

before in an interview to us they’ve claimed that football is their country’s 

national sport and real El Salvador male citizens are great at football. 

Let’s say El Salvador did not let us down. 

No  sooner  said  than  done,  in  one 

of  the  games 

Rodrigo  José  was 

the  one  to  score  the  decisive 

goal,  in  yet  another  game  his 

compatriot 



Edwin Ariel did the 

same.  By  noon  Catalyzer  jour-

nalists  —  to  their  amazement 

—  spotted  a  girl  at  the  pitch. A 

beautiful  representative  of  Swit-

zerland named 



Josephine Pratiwi was 

chasing the ball in sandals, easily beating 

the guys. “Weren’t you afraid to play against her?” — we asked a virtuoso 

Venezuelan 



Johel Arteaga. “Not me, because we’re in one team, but other 

teams really should! — he said. — Yeah, playing football with girls is actually 

pretty awesome”.

>> from page 1

Yesterday morning the future сhemistry gurus proved science is not their 

only strong point. The pre-dinner break was enough for over a half of all 

IChO male Olympians to show up at the pitch. Multinational teams played 

in the come-and-go “sudden death” mode, meaning that every match was 

played  until the fi rst scored goal.

Valerio  Lamanto  appears  to  be 

a  fi ne  judge  of  strict  and  logi-

cal  beauty.  Maybe  this  is  why 

he  doesn’t  normally  celebrate 

his  birthdays.  “What’s  the  point, 

if I want to have a party I can any-

way have it”, he says. 

When  Valerio  turned  18  on  July 

17th he didn’t even care for phone 

calls  (left  his  cellphone  back  at 

home in Italy). But since Russia is 

one  of  the  countries  he’s  always 

wanted to visit, this birthday, Vale-

rio admits, looks a little like cele-

bration.

— Eighteen years old in Italy mean you’re 

of age — with all that it implies. It also 

means  that  in  a  year  I’ll  be  fi nishing 

school and when I do, I’ll try to enter Scu-

ola Normale Superiore in Pisa.

— I can’t say that much changed over this 

year since my last birthday. But one thing 

is defi nitely different: I’m here at IChO. I 

didn’t get there last year, even though I 

applied and was the fourth in my country. 

This time I was luckier.

—  I  love  organic  chemistry.  There’s  so 

much beauty in these reactions, they’re 

logical,  yet  complicated,  and  this  all 

challenges me incredibly.

— There is a person I admire, his name 

is, I mean was Alan Turing. The father of 

computation and the fi rst guy to realise 

what we can do with electronics! Only 

his destiny is something I wouldn’t like 

to repeat.

— If I could get a Nobel Prize, I’d love 

to get it for inventing a cure for cancer. 

Though  I  don’t  think  it’s  possible,  I’m 

not very much into pharmaceuticals, I’m 

more about theory and I don’t really care 

how it’s applied.

— My favorite chemical reaction is Flu-

orine  +  Cesium,  because  it’s  intense.  It 

goes between the strongest metal and 

non-metal elements, it gives out no gas, 

it can go at low temperature and it gives 

the beautiful proper fl ame. 

— If I could get a free ticket, I’d go to Ice-

land. Ice, fi re, you see, I like contrasts :)

— The substance I’d like to be associated 

with is tungsten. Because it has the high-

est  melting  temperature  ever.  It  never 

fuses.


— I haven’t celebrated birthday for 5 or 

6 years. I don’t even remember what it is 

to get presents, except for birthday cards. 

I don’t know what present I’d like to get... 

What? A kilogram of cesium? Haha, well, 

sounds nerdy, but that actually would be 

pretty cool!

Valerio Lamanto, Italy

18 years old



Born: Rive, a small village

80 km from Turin



Lives with his family:mother,

father and a younger sister.



Speaks Italian and English

Studies chemistry for 3 years. 

Believes it to be the second purest 

science after physics.



Kremlin insights



Country in Brief

New Zealand

Every day Catalyzer picks a random delegation and goes to meet the team.

Olympians shared what they discovered during the Kremlin tour. 

Catalyzer shares something too.



The New Zealand team consists of three 

guys and one girl. We asked them to 

introduce each other.

Team about Cindy:

 Cindy is the only girl in the 

team. She can play viola.

Cindy  on  her  country’s  great  in-

ventions  in  chemistry:  Ernest  Ruth-

erford who was born in New Zealand 

postulated  planetary  model  for  atomic  structure. 

He was the fi rst chemist to try splitting up an atom 

and it’s nucleus.

Cindy chooses the most typical New Zealander 

of her team: Probably Frank probably, because he 

is pretty relaxed and he really creative in the way 

he solves problems. Besides, Frank drives, although 

he’s pretty young. 



Team about Frank:

 Frank is very smart. And has 

an amazing talent to sleep in different 

places — in the bus, in the plane, at the 

station — mostly everywhere! 



Frank  fi nds  differences  between 

Moscow and his own city: Moscow University is so 

huge comparing to Portland, where the university is 

all spread-out, so the buildings can be located all 

over the city. And your transport seems a bit more 

effi cient than ours.

Team  about  Ka  Yin  Keniel  Yao: 

Keniel 


plays  saxophone,  he’s  fond  of  music. 

He  dreams  of  inventing  a  time-ma-

chine,  because  he’d  like  to  use  his 

time more effi ciently. He wants it to be 

made of radioactive compounds because this would 

be real fun. 



Keniel about his favorite substance: Lumines-

cent substances because they shine in the dark and 

I like this blue light. 

Team about Scott Huang:

 Scott is very quiet. 

He enjoys playing badminton! He is re-

ally very good at maths.

Scott  on  chemistry  education  in 

New Zealand: Children start studying 

chemistry at 13 or 14 years, and it is com-

pulsory until they are 16. We have 5 science classes 

a week and 2 of them are chemistry lessons.



Alexander Matthew Turner, Australia 

We’ve learnt a lot about Russian 

medieval history today, I was sur-

prised to learn that there wasn’t 

just one Kremlin in Moscow, there 

are a lot of kremlins all over Russia.



Kim Kristian Kuntze, Finland 

It was very curious to know that 

Catherine the Great had about 

15000 dresses and over 1500 

carriages.

Roman Beránek, Czech Republic 

We’ve learnt that Ivan the Great Bell 

Tower is the highest building in Mos-

cow Kremlin, it’s over 60 meters high. 

And the icon wall there is also very high 

and really impressive. We also noticed Russians really like 

gold, there are so many golden things there in Kremlin. 

And the size of those treasures is a bit... enormous!

Priscila Vensaus, Paula Borovik, 

Nicolas,  Nicolas Del Grosso, 

Lautaro Vogt, Argentina

Amani Mahdiyar, Heidari Hirbod, 

Iran

Amani Mahdiyar, Heidari Hirbod, 



Iran

Ada Maria Krzak, Denmark

            The word "kremlin" itself means "a steep bank" 

and was used for Russian fortresses built on river 

banks. The most famous Russian kremlins are situated 

in Moscow, Pskov, Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod, Kolom-

na, Tula, Kazan, Rostov, Astrakhan and Ryazan.

             The height of the Bell Tower is in fact over 

80 meters. After it was built in 16-17th century, there 

was a longtime ban prohibiting the construction 

             Catherine (Ekaterina) the Great (1729-1796) 

was a Russian Empress whose court is known for 

particular splendor.

of buildings higher than it. So till the turn of 18th 

century it really was the tallest building in Moscow.



Meet

Russian

Chemists

What kind of souvenirs did you buy? 

Happy Birthday!

Nikolay Zinin

(1812-1880)



First steps in chemistry

Was studying maths at the University of Kazan, when 

his  rector,  an  outstanding  mathematician  Nikolay 

Lobachevsky,  persuaded  Zinin  to  do  with  chemistry. 

You could think it was a fail for a young guy to be 

advised not to keep on with maths by a great math-

ematician of his days. But in fact Lobachevsky said: 

“If you’re brilliant at math, you’ll be good in chemistry, 

and we are now in a great need for chemists”.

Contribution to chemistry

In 1842 discovered the reduction of aromatic nitro 

сompounds  into  aromatic  amines  (Zinin  reaction). 

Basing  on  it,  synthesized  aniline.  Zinin’s  syntheses 

became  the  basis  for  creating  the  industry  of  syn-

thetic dyes, explosives, pharmaceuticals, fragrances. 

He discovered the hydrazobenzene regrouping when 

exposed to acids  and called it “benzo-benzidine rear-

rangement” In 1852 synthesized isothiocyanate acid 

allylether, сommonly called “volatile mustard oil”. 

Discovered ureides (1855).

Interests

Contemporaries  about  Zinin:  “Chemistry,  mineralo-

gy, botany, geology, astronomy, physiology, — he was 

familiar  with  all  that,  and  fundamentally.  He  had 

amazing memory — he would quoted whole pages of 

Schiller in German and in translation”.



Quote: “Your Alfred Nobel just snatched the 

dynamite from under our noses!”

Alfred Nobel, the future inventor of dynamite, 

was  Zinin’s  countryside  neighbor  and  saw 

Zinin’s experiments with nitroglycerin.

magnets — 

12

Moscow view — 



7

mugs — 


4

T-shirt — 

2

nothing — 



4

khokhloma-style spoon, egg (Faberge imitation), matryoshka — 1



Burn after reading

By Jan Apotheker, member OPCW Temporary Working Group

on education and outreach, chair organization IChO 2002, Groningen

All substances are fairly common. 



Pseudoephedrine is the active substance in some cough syrups, 

originally extracted from Chinese plant Ephedra. 



Thiodiglycol is used for water-based dyes in cloth 

manufacturing industry, especially in developing countries, as well as for printing inks and felt-tipped 

pens.  

Isopropanol is the main component in glass cleaners and a solvent for many innocent purpos-

es.  ˜-lactone is a widely used industrial detergent. 

Now check out related compounds. 

It shouldn’t take you too long to fi gure out how to convert compounds in chart 1 into those of chart 2. 

The trouble is that compounds in chart 2 are respectively: 

mustard gasmethamphetamine (crys-

tal meth), 



sarin and gamma hydroxyl butyric acid (party drug GHB). As you can guess, all four are 

dangerous and strictly forbidden in most countries of the world.

Not only chemicals pose these problems. Whole chemical plants can be misused in much the same 

way. This is what has happened several times over the last 30 years, when certain countries have sup-

plied to others equipment then used to produce weapons and toxins like mustard gas, sarin and VX.

The problem of the dual use of chemicals (for both innocent purposes and doing harm to others) 

is rather ethical than scientifi c. How does the international community deal with the problem? 

>> To be continued in the next issue.

How is chemical weapon made

postcards with



Fang Haitian,

student, Singapore

Alex Eremin,

organizer, Russia

Is 


there anything in common between 

thiodiglycol,  pseudoephedrine,  and 

isopropanol or ˜-lactone? 

Contacts

45th IChO web-site:

www.icho2013.chem.msu.ru

45th IChO secretariat:

info@icho2013.chem.msu.ru

Catalyzer team

Lyudmila Levina

Vladimir Golovner

Ivan Afanasyev

Lena Brandt

Anastasia Grigorieva

Lena Yudina

Zoya Vysotskaya





Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə