By J. C. Raterink and S. M. Nooij, Taniq, and S. Koussios, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands



Yüklə 61,25 Kb.

tarix05.09.2018
ölçüsü61,25 Kb.


by J.C. Raterink and S.M. Nooij, Taniq, and S. Koussios, Delft 

University of Technology, The Netherlands

The design of pressurized filament wound structures is a wide-

spread and well-understood subject (refs. 5 and 8). A classical 

item  produced  by  means  of  filament  winding  is  the  well-

known isotensoid pressure vessel. It has found applications in 

LPG  tanks  and  inflatable  bodies  to  jack  up  heavy  loads  in 

crisis situations. 

  Design in engineering applications involve multiple disci-

plines that depend on each other. These are the shape, materi-

als, function and production process. The trend is to focus on 

the improvement of the materials used. The Delft University 

of  Technology  has  developed  Corpo  fiber  reinforcement, 

which focuses on the shape. The Corpo technology considers 

isotensoidal shapes that are stacked onto each other and are 

overwound in an integral fashion. 

  This article introduces the Corpo technology and explains 

its  basic  principles.  There  are  three  design  parameters  that 

describe a Corpo shape. They influence the behavior of the 

product and can be chosen for each individual application.  

  This  patented  technology  is  currently  owned  by  Taniq,  a 

spin-off from Delft University of Technology. Taniq has fur-

ther developed the technology and applied it to improve the 

products and production processes of its customers in the tech-

nical  rubber  industry.  It  has  many  advantages  compared  to 

conventional design; the weight and durability of the product, 

for example, can be improved. All these advantages contribute 

to the reduction in costs, which is, of course, the driving factor 

in the market nowadays. 

 

Basic principles of the Corpo technology

Composites are materials made of two or more components. 

By  combining  a  matrix  and  a  reinforcing  material,  high 

strength  to  weight  ratios  can  be  achieved.  The  reinforcing 

material, usually a kind of fiber, provides the strength and stiff-

ness. The matrix, usually with low strength and stiffness, pro-

vides air-fluid tightness and supports the reinforcing materials 

to maintain their relative positions. These positions are of great 

importance  because  they  influence  the  resulting  mechanical 

properties (refs. 1 and 3). 

  Fiber  path  optimization  is  quite  well  known  for  straight 

hoses  and  single  bellow  shaped  products  (ref.  8).  A  shape 

where  all  fibers  are  equally  loaded  is  called  an  isotensoid 

shape.  Isotensoid  loading  has  many  advantages.  Firstly,  the 

performance of the fibers can be maximized throughout the 

whole structure. In this way, the product can be made lighter 

or sustain higher forces. Secondly, it can be designed in such a 

way that the matrix material does not carry load (ref. 6). This 

leads to zero shear stress in the matrix, improving the durabil-

ity of the product. 

  Taniq and Delft University have developed a novel tech-

nique for pressure vessels, called Corpo fiber reinforcement. 

The technology considers isotensoidal shapes that are stacked 

onto each other and are integrally overwound (ref. 7). This 

integrally wound fiber path is geodesic, which means that the 

fiber is running over the shortest path. As the geodesic path 

is entirely determined by the underlying meridian profile, the 

latter is designed in such a way that the fibers are equally 

tensioned everywhere. Therefore, the structure is an isoten-

soid.


Design parameters

By combining the so called netting theory and the membrane 

theory, a set of equations can be obtained that describe these 

geodesic isotensoid fiber path shapes (ref. 4). With only three 

parameters, qr and ρ

0

, different meridian shapes can be cre-



ated. The meridian profile is then revolved to obtain a rotation-

ally symmetric body (figure 1). Multiple rotational symmetric 

bodies  can  be  stacked  onto  each  other  to  increase  the  axial 

length of the product. 

  The parameter q is approximately equal to the squared ratio 

Improving the performance of fiber 

reinforced pressurizable products 

APRIL 2009

23

Figure 1 - revolving a meridian profile 



to obtain a three-dimensional 

Corpo shape (ref. 2)



p-axis

p

min


Z-axis

Meridian 

profile

p

0

3D representation of the vessel



40     20     0     -20    -40 -40

-20


020

40

110



100

90

80



70

60

50



40

Figure 2 - different types of isotensoidal 

shapes, with different q values, stacked 

onto each other




RUBBER WORLD

Application of the technology

In this section, the wide range of possible applications of the 

Corpo  technology  is  outlined.  First,  existing  conventional 

products are introduced, and their problems and limitations are 

discussed. After that, a tailored solution using the technology 

is given for each subject. 



Turbo hoses

Turbocharged  engines  incorporate  turbo  hoses  to  transport 

compressed air between the air outlet of the compressor and 

the inlet manifold of the engine. They must level internal pres-

sure and be flexible at the same time. To cope with increasing 

pressure, the conventional approach is to add more material. 

This has a negative effect on the flexibility. Another problem 

of conventional hoses is that reinforcement rings are required 

in order to maintain the bellow shape under internal pressure. 

  Figure 4 shows schematized principles of the production of 

a conventional hose and a Corpo reinforced hose, respectively. 

The fabrication does mainly rely on manual labor. First, rubber 

sheet material is reinforced with fabric plies by means of cal-

endering. These plies are then wrapped around a steel or alu-

minium mandrel. Cotton tape is tightly wrapped around the 

mandrel to compress the plies. The hose is then vulcanized 

using hot air or steam. A large force is required to pull the hose 

from the mandrel; this process is assisted by inflation of the 

hose. Finally, the reinforcement rings are installed.

  A Corpo reinforced turbo hose will keep its bellow shape 

under pressure, eliminating the need for reinforcement rings. 

Due to the optimized fiber geometry, up to 70% reduction of 

fibers and 30% of rubber is possible. For this product, no weft 

fibers and calendering are needed, which reduces the material 

cost. Figure 5 shows a conventional turbo hose with reinforce-

ment rings and a Corpo reinforced turbo hose under produc-

tion. The production process of the Corpo structures can be 

fully automated since it mainly relies on filament winding and 

automated rubber placement.

Actuators

Actuators are used to induce movements and can replace pneu-

matic or hydraulic cylinders in a wide range of industrial ap-

plications. Conventional elastomeric air actuators such as lift-

ing bags and industrial air springs are reinforced by fiber plies. 

These plies have a large contact surface in the cross-over points 

of  the  maximum  dimensionless  radius  (Y

eq.


)  and  minimum 

dimensionless radius (Y

min.

 ) (figure 1):



             Y

eq.


    

2

    q = 



(

        


)

  

             Y



min.

                                                                    (1)

  Changing this parameter actually influences the degree of 

concavity at the areas near the smallest radius (figure 2). Dif-

ferent products require different q; increasing the parameter q 

leads to higher flexibility due to increased concavity. An off-

shore pipeline requires higher flexibility than a turbo hose, and 

will therefore require a higher q.

  The  dimensionless  load  factor  r  is  the  ratio  between  the 

axial resultant of the internal pressure on the projected surface 

at the equator and a possible external axial force at the polar 

ends:


          k

a

    



    r =          

        Y

eq.

2

                                                                         (2)



where  k

a

  is  a  dimensionless  coefficient.  This  coefficient  is 



calculated with:

           A    

    k

a

 =          



           pPρ

0

2



                                                                    (3)

where  ρ

0

  denotes  the  minimum  shell  radius,  P  the  internal 



pressure and A the external axial force on the structure. The 

parameter r influences the axial length of the product. When r 

is zero, the Corpo shape will not change in shape when pres-

surized. Choosing an r that is smaller than zero, the product is 

able  to  withstand  an  external  force  in  axial  direction  while 

pressurized. To withstand this force on the structure, a positive 



r should be chosen. For all configurations, the Corpo shape, 

when pressurized, tends to go to its equilibrium position of r = 

0. This means that a shape with a positive r will contract. Also, 

the radius tends to decrease, which can be used as a clamping 

force at the edges for a better sealing of the flanges. This favor-

able behavior can be used for compensators/expansion joints, 

for which the sealing at the edges is critical. Different meridian 

shapes with varying r are plotted in figure 3. 

  The profile is sized with the parameter ρ

0

, which was al-



ready introduced and stands for the theoretical minimum ra-

dius of a cell. It is a theoretical minimum, because for most 

shapes, the actual minimum radius is slightly larger. When, for 

example, the required radius of an end connection is known, 



ρ

0

 can be changed accordingly to make this connection fit.



24

Figure 3 - representation of meridians with 

different r values plotted (ref. 7)

r = 0.5

r = 0

r = -0.25

r = -0.5(= -1/q)

r = -0.6

z

Y



p

0

p



0

r = 0.5

= 0

= -0.25

= -0.5(= -1/q)

r = -0.6


Figure 4 - schematized principles of the 

production of a conventional hose and a 

Corpo reinforced one

Conventional reinforcement 

of bellow shapes

Corpo reinforcement 

of bellow shapes



APRIL 2009

25

which cause large stresses during expansion/contraction. The 



induced stresses limit the maximum allowable pressure and the 

lifetime of the actuator. There are already cylindrical elasto-

meric air actuators which allow exact prediction and control of 

the movements due to controlled fiber placement. However, 

applying the same principles for the reinforcement of complex 

shapes, like a  bellow, is more difficult and hardly known.  

  The advantages of these bellow shapes are that they provide 

high forces in combination with large strokes and a minimal 

deflation height. The properties of these complex shaped ac-

tuators  can  be  improved  using  the  Corpo  technology.  With 

Corpo, the fibers are geodesically wound over the product in-

stead of using reinforced plies. These fibers follow the shortest 

path and therefore do not need friction to stay in place. Because 

of this fact and the absence of shear stresses in the matrix, the 

maximum  allowable  pressure  and  lifetime  are  significantly 

increased. 



Expansion joint

Expansion  joints  are  used  to  compensate  the  relative  move-

ments in rigid piping systems. Because the conventional pro-

duction methods do not allow optimal orientation of the rein-

forcement material, a considerable amount of fiber and rubber 

is  needed  to  obtain  the  required  strength.  The  unnecessary 

material use results in a high wall thickness, leading to less 

flexibility. Furthermore, without controlling the orientation of 

the reinforcement, it is not possible to control the shape while 

pressurized. This makes it more difficult to design and can lead 

to failures resulting in loss of fluids or gas. 

  By using the Corpo technology to reinforce compensators/

expansion joints, these problems can be solved. The smart fiber 

placement will increase the pressure resistance which can re-

duce the amount of materials needed; this leads to a slender, 

more economical and flexible joint. Another advantage is that 

the behavior under pressure can be predicted and controlled. 

This increases the safety and also enables new functionalities 

such as self-tightening ends for the flanges (figure 6).

Conclusion

In  this  article,  we  have  presented  the  design  principles  and 

some typical applications for the Corpo reinforcement technol-

ogy. Its optimized fiber geometry is obtained through geodesic 

fiber paths on axially connected isotensoidal cells. Depending 

on the required dimensions, shape and properties of the prod-

uct, the parameters rq and ρ

0

 can be chosen for a tailored solu-



tion.  Parameter  q  influences  the  degree  of  concavity  at  the 

areas near the smallest radi-

us. The dimensionless load 

factor r is the ratio between 

the axial resultant of the in-

ternal pressure and a possi-

ble  external  axial  force  at 

the polar ends. The profile is 

sized with the parameter ρ

0



which is approximately the 

theoretical minimum radius 

of a cell. 

  A comparison with exist-

ing  conventional  products 

has been carried out to high-

light the advantages of this 

technology.  Improvement 

Figure 6 - a 

compensating hose 

applicable for 

offshore pipelines 

made with Corpo

Figure 5 - a conventional (l) and a Corpo (r) 

reinforced turbo hose

opportunities for turbo hoses, actuators and expansion joints 

are hereby given. The main advantages include:

  • Higher possible pressure levels;

  • increased durability;

  • lighter products possible (up to 70% reduction of fibers 

and up to 50% in rubber);

  • control of geometry;

  • increased flexibility; 

  • cost reduction; and

  • higher production automation.

  It can be said that the performance and weight are related to 

each other; either the same pressure levels can be obtained with 

less material, or higher pressure levels can be reached with the 

same amount of material. The reduction of materials automati-

cally results in cost reduction. 



 

References

1. Beukers, A. and Hinte, E. van, “Lightness: The inevitable 

renaissance of minimum energy structures,” Amsterdam: 010 

Publishers, 1998.

2.  Brevet, M., “Development of a mandrel for line production 

of charge air cooler hoses with Corpo reinforcement,” Master 

thesis, TU Delft, 2008.

3. Daniel, I.M. and Ishai, O., Engineering Mechanics of Com-

posite Materials, New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 

2006.

4. Herkel, C. ten, “Integral geodesic winding in hose applica-

tions. Master thesis,” TU Delft, 2007.

5. Jong, de Th., (in Dutch) “Het wikkelen van drukvaten vol-

gens  de  netting  theorie,”  Report  VTH-166.  Structures  and 

Materials Laboratory, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft 

University of Technology, Delft, April, 1971.

6.  Koussios, S., Nooij S.M. and Bergsma, O.K., “Pressurized 

structures  and  hoses:  Improved  structural  performance  and 

flexibility through optimal fiber reinforcement.”

7. Koussios, S., “Filament winding: A unified approach,” PhD. 

Thesis. Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of 

Technology. Delft University Press, 2004.

8. Vasiliev, V.V., Krikanov, A.A. and Razin, A.F., “New genera-

tion of filament-wound composite pressure vessels for commer-

cial applications,” Composite Structures 2003: 62: 449-459.


Dostları ilə paylaş:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə